Clinical Trials Using Melphalan

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Melphalan. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-74 of 74

  • JAK Inhibitor before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Primary or Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This phase II trial studies how well giving a JAK inhibitor before a donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with myelofibrosis that developed without another condition (primary) or evolved from other bone marrow disorders (secondary). JAK inhibitors are a class of drugs that may stop the growth of abnormal cells by blocking an enzyme needed for cell growth. Giving a JAK inhibitor such as ruxolitinib before a donor stem cell transplant may help reduce symptoms of myelofibrosis such as inflammation and enlargement of the spleen, improve the patient’s general physical condition, and prevent complications from occurring after the transplant. Infusing healthy stem cells from a donor into the patient may help the patient's bone marrow work normally and make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving a JAK inhibitor before a donor stem cell transplant may help improve transplant outcomes in patients with myelofibrosis.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Intra-osseous Donor Umbilical Cord Blood and Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Co-transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This clinical trial studies intra-osseous donor umbilical cord blood and mesenchymal stromal cell co-transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a co-transplant of donor umbilical cord blood and mesenchymal stromal cells into the bone (intra-osseous) helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil at the time of transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Immunotherapy Following Reduced Intensity Conditioning and Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant for Poor Risk CD30+ Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    Patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma who are CD30+ will receive a standard of care reduced intensity regimen and an allogeneic stem cell transplant (from another person, related or unrelated). Following recovery, patients will receive a medication called Brentuximab Vendotin which is targeted against CD30+ cells. The study hypothesis is that this treatment will be safe and well tolerated in children and young adults.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Partially-Matched Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies partially-matched donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and / or total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Lurie Children's Hospital-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

  • Natural Killer Cells before and after Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    This phase I / II studies the side effects and best dose of natural killer cells before and after donor stem cell transplant and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or chronic myelogenous leukemia. Giving chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell or bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Anti-GD2 Monoclonal Antibody Hu14.18K322A and Combination Chemotherapy before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant and Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Previously Untreated High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu14.18K322A and combination chemotherapy before autologous stem cell transplant and radiation therapy works in treating younger patients with previously untreated high-risk neuroblastoma. Giving chemotherapy before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. Also, monoclonal antibodies, such as anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu14.18K322A, can find cancer cells and either kill them or deliver cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Targeting the IPA and Matching for the Non-Inherited Maternal Antigen for Haplo-Cord Transplantation

    In this trial, we aim to improve the outcomes of haplo cord transplant. Haplo cord transplant is a novel and promising way to improve transplant outcomes. We hypothesize that identification of a graft that is at least 5 / 6 matched and inherited paternal antigen (IPA) targeted (i.e., cord blood grafts share one or more IPA antigens with the prospective recipient) is more important to the outcome of haplo cord transplant than the nucleated cell dose. The identification of such a graft for a large proportion of the subjects may necessitate accepting a lower umbilical cord graft dose. In addition to a umbilical cord blood transplant, recipients will receive stem cells from a family member ( a haplo-identical donor) . After collection and prior to infusion, these cells will be purified using a device called a CliniMACS CD34 selection device. The subject will undergo a chemotherapy conditioning regimen prior to transplantation. No experimental drugs are used in this study, and the combinations of drugs that will be used in the conditioning regimen are combinations that have been used in the past.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Donor Progenitor Cell and Natural Kill Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well donor progenitor cell and natural killer cell transplant works in treating younger patients with cancers of the blood that are at high risk of coming back or spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When certain stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor bone marrow transplant works in treating patients with solid tumors that are likely to recur (come back) or spread. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells when they do not exactly match the patient's blood. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Natural Killer Cells, Elotuzumab, Lenalidomide, and High Dose Melphalan, followed by Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and best dose of umbilical cord blood-derived natural killer cells when given together with elotuzumab, lenalidomide, and high dose melphalan before autologous stem cell transplant and to see how well they work in treating patients with multiple myeloma. Before transplant, stem cells are taken from patients and stored. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and melphalan, may work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving natural killer cells from donor umbilical cord blood before transplant may also kill myeloma cells that remain in the body after the last chemotherapy treatment. After treatment, stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Natural Killer Cells and Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best way to give natural killer cells and donor umbilical cord blood transplant in treating patients with hematological malignancies. Giving chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Auto Transplant High Dose Melphalan vs High Dose Melphalan+Bortezomib in Pts With Multiple Myeloma Age 65 Years or Older

    In this study the investigators are comparing this standard regimen to the newly established regimen of melphalan and bortezomib.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia

  • Disease-Specific High-Dose Conditioning Regimens in Treating Patients Undergoing T-cell Depleted Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies or Other Lethal Hematologic Disorders

    This phase II trial studies how well disease-specific high-dose conditioning regimens work in treating patients undergoing T-cell depleted peripheral blood stem cell transplant for hematologic malignancies or other lethal hematologic disorders. Giving high doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving antithymocyte globulin and removing the T-cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Reduced Intensity Conditioning Regimen for the Treatment of Non-Malignant Disorders

    This phase II trial studies how well a reduced intensity conditioning regimen works in treating patients with non-cancer (non-malignant) disorders. Reduced intensity conditioning involves giving medicines that suppress the immune system before giving the donor stem cells. It does not completely eliminate the blood making cells in bone marrow. Giving a reduced intensity conditioning regimen may result in fewer short and long term side effects, shorter hospital stay than after conditioning that completely destroys the bone marrow, and blood counts may recover more quickly.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Busulfan, Melphalan, and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies how well giving busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine phosphate together followed by a donor umbilical cord blood transplant works in treating younger patients with acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is likely to recur (come back), or spread. Giving chemotherapy drugs, such as busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine phosphate, before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine before and after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Carboplatin, Melphalan, Etoposide Phosphate, Mannitol, and Sodium Thiosulfate in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Brain Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan when given together with carboplatin, etoposide phosphate, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate and to see how well they work in treating patients with previously treated brain tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan, carboplatin, and etoposide phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) uses mannitol to open the blood vessels around the brain and allow cancer-killing substances to be carried directly to the brain. Sodium thiosulfate may help lessen or prevent hearing loss and toxicities in patients undergoing chemotherapy with carboplatin and BBBD. Giving carboplatin, melphalan, etoposide phosphate, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate together may be an effective treatment for brain tumors.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Different Therapies in Treating Infants With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine, methotrexate, leucovorin, and antithymocyte globulin before and after transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is most effective in treating acute leukemia. PURPOSE: This randomized clinical trial is studying how well different therapies work in treating infants with newly diagnosed acute leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Leukemia or Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    The goal of this phase II clinical study is to learn about the safety of inotuzumab ozogamicin when given with fludarabine, with or without bendamustine, melphalan, and rituximab before and after a stem cell transplant. Researchers also want to learn if inotuzumab ozogamicin when given after a stem cell transplant can help control leukemia and lymphoma. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22-positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Giving chemotherapy before a bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor attack the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving tacrolimus and filgrastim before or after the transplant may stop this from happening. Fludarabine, bendamustine, melphalan, and rituximab are commonly given before stem cell transplants. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with leukemia or lymphoma undergoing stem cell transplantation.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • CAR.CD19-CD28-zeta-2A-iCasp9-IL15-Transduced Cord Blood NK Cells, High-Dose Chemotherapy, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Participants with B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR).CD19-CD28-zeta-2A-iCasp9-IL15-transduced cord blood NK cells when given together with high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant and to see how well they work in treating participants with B-cell lymphoma. Cord blood-derived CAR-NK cells may react against the B-cell lymphoma cells in the body, which may help to control the disease. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant may help kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Melphalan Hydrochloride in Treating Participants with Newly-Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan hydrochloride in treating participants with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma who are undergoing a donor stem cell transplantation. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplantation helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the participant, they may help the participant's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving melphalan hydrochloride before a donor stem cell transplantation may work better than standard chemotherapy in helping to prevent multiple myeloma from coming back.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Melphalan, Carboplatin, Mannitol, and Sodium Thiosulfate in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Progressive CNS Embryonal or Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan when given together with carboplatin, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate, and to see how well they work in treating patients with recurrent or progressive central nervous system (CNS) embryonal or germ cell tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) uses mannitol to open the blood vessels around the brain and allow cancer-killing substances to be carried directly to the brain. Sodium thiosulfate may help lessen or prevent hearing loss and toxicities in patients undergoing chemotherapy with carboplatin and BBBD. Giving melphalan together with carboplatin, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate may be an effective treatment for recurrent or progressive CNS embryonal or germ cell tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Venetoclax in Combination with BEAM Chemotherapy Regimen in Treating Patients with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when given in combination with standard chemotherapy regimen in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma undergoing stem cell transplant. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known how well venetoclax works when given with standard chemotherapy in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma undergoing stem cell transplant.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Vorinostat in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Undergoing Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of vorinostat in preventing graft versus host disease in children, adolescents, and young adults who are undergoing unrelated donor blood and bone marrow transplant. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells, called graft-versus-host disease. During this process, chemicals (called cytokines) are released that may damage certain body tissues, including the gut, liver and skin. Vorinostat may be an effective treatment for graft-versus-host disease caused by a bone marrow transplant.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Ex-Vivo Expanded Donor Regulatory T Cells for Prevention of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease

    This phase I trial studies donor regulatory T lymphocytes in preventing acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in patients undergoing donor stem cell transplant. GVHD is a disease caused when cells from a donated stem cell graft attack the normal tissue of the transplant patient. Regulatory T lymphocytes are a type of immune cell that blocks the actions of some other types of lymphocytes, to keep the immune system from becoming over-active. Regulatory T lymphocytes may be a better treatment for preventing acute graft-versus-host disease caused by a donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida