Clinical Trials Using Metformin Hydrochloride

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Metformin Hydrochloride. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-19 of 19
  • I-SPY 2 TRIAL: Neoadjuvant and Personalized Adaptive Novel Agents to Treat Breast Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to further advance the ability to practice personalized medicine by learning which new drug agents are most effective with which types of breast cancer tumors and by learning more about which early indicators of response (tumor analysis prior to surgery via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images along with tissue and blood samples) are predictors of treatment success.
    Location: 15 locations

  • Metformin Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, Irinotecan Hydrochloride, and Temozolomide in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of metformin hydrochloride when given together with vincristine sulfate, irinotecan hydrochloride, and temozolomide in treating younger patients with solid tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or have not responded to previous treatment (refractory). Metformin hydrochloride may slow the growth of tumor cells and may be an effective treatment for solid tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, irinotecan hydrochloride, and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving metformin hydrochloride together with vincristine sulfate, irinotecan hydrochloride, and temozolomide may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 14 locations

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Nab-paclitaxel, Metformin Hydrochloride, and a Standardized Dietary Supplement in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of gemcitabine hydrochloride, nab-paclitaxel, metformin hydrochloride, and a standardized dietary supplement in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Metformin hydrochloride, used for diabetes, may also help kill cancer cells. Dietary supplements (curcumin, vitamin D, vitamin K2, vitamin K1, B-6, high selenium broccoli sprouts, epigallocatechin gallate, L-carnitine, garlic extract, genistein, zinc amino chelate, mixed toxopherols, ascorbic acid, D-limonene) can block different targets in the cancer cell simultaneously and may slow down cancer growth. Giving gemcitabine hydrochloride, nab-paclitaxel, and metformin hydrochloride with a dietary supplement may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that cannot be removed by surgery.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Metformin Hydrochloride, Cisplatin and External Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Participants with Stage III-IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of metformin hydrochloride when given together with cisplatin and external beam radiation therapy in treating participants with stage III-IV head and neck squamous cell cancer. Metformin hydrochloride may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. External beam radiation therapy uses high-energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving metformin hydrochloride, cisplatin and external beam radiation therapy may work better at treating head and neck squamous cell cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Bicalutamide with or without Metformin Hydrochloride in Lowering PSA Levels in Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies bicalutamide with or without metformin hydrochloride in lowering prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in patients with prostate cancer. Androgen receptors are proteins that attach to male hormones (androgens) causing prostate cancer cells to grow. Bicalutamide blocks these proteins and may keep cancer cells from growing. Metformin hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether bicalutamide with or without metformin hydrochloride is a better treatment for prostate cancer biochemical recurrence.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Metformin Hydrochloride and Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System in Treating Patients with Atypical Endometrial Hyperplasia or Endometrial Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well metformin hydrochloride works when added to levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system in treating patients with atypical endometrial hyperplasia or endometrial cancer who cannot undergo surgery. Metformin hydrochloride is a widely-used type II diabetes drug that may also stop cancer cells from dividing. Estrogen may cause cancer. Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is a device placed in the uterus that reduces the level of estrogen in the body. Giving metformin hydrochloride in addition to treatment with levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system may be an effective alternative for patients with atypical endometrial hyperplasia or endometrial cancer who cannot undergo surgery.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Metformin Hydrochloride and Oligomeric Procyanidin Complex in Reducing AGE Levels in Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer Receiving Endocrine Therapy

    This pilot phase I trial studies how well metformin hydrochloride and oligomeric procyanidin complex work in reducing advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) levels in patients with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer that has spread from the primary site to other places in the body who are receiving endocrine therapy. AGEs are a type of metabolite, or substance, found in food and produced in the body that may have a potential link to cancer. Giving metformin hydrochloride and oligomeric procyanidin complex may help reduce AGE levels in breast cancer patients.
    Location: Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

  • Metformin Hydrochloride and Doxycycline, Alone or Together in Treating Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well metformin hydrochloride and doxycycline alone or together work in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that can be removed by surgery. Metformin hydrochloride may reduce the metabolic activity of cancer cells and of surrounding supportive tissue. Doxycycline may minimize toxic side effects of anti-cancer therapy. Giving metformin hydrochloride and doxycycline may work better in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Nivolumab and Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    The purpose of this study is to find the benefits of combining nivolumab with metformin in advanced non-small cell lung cancer with and without prior treatment with immunotherapy. We will also be looking at the safety of the combination. Nivolumab is currently approved in certain cancers such as melanoma, lung cancer and kidney cancer. Metformin is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat diabetes. In this study, Metformin is being used to treat cancer. This use is not approved by the FDA; therefore, in this study, it is considered experimental. Experimental means the U.S. FDA has not approved the drug for use in your type of cancer. Nivolumab is an antibody (a human protein that sticks to a part of the tumor and / or immune cells) designed to allow the body’s immune system to work against tumor cells. It is believed that metformin has immune modifying properties, meaning it can boost your immune system. As a result, it may help certain cancer treatments, known as immunotherapy, to work better.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Metformin Hydrochloride and Doxycycline in Treating Patients with Localized Breast, Uterine, or Cervical Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well metformin hydrochloride works together with doxycycline in treating patients with localized breast, uterine, or cervical cancer. Metformin hydrochloride may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Doxycycline may stop the growth of bacteria by keeping them from making proteins and minimized the toxic side effects of anti-cancer therapy. It is not yet known whether giving metformin hydrochloride together with doxycycline may be a better way in treating patients with localized breast, uterine, or cervical cancer.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Borderline-Resectable or Locally-Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies stereotactic body radiation therapy and metformin hydrochloride in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that may or may not be able to be removed by surgery (borderline-resectable). Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Metformin hydrochloride is used for diabetes, but may also kill cancer cells as demonstrated in laboratory studies. Giving stereotactic body radiation therapy with metformin hydrochloride may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well metformin hydrochloride and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with stage III-IV ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, paclitaxel and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Metformin hydrochloride may help carboplatin, paclitaxel and docetaxel work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drugs. Studying samples of blood and tissue in the laboratory from patients receiving metformin hydrochloride may help doctors learn more about the effects of metformin hydrochloride on cells. It may also help doctors understand how well patients respond to treatment. Giving metformin hydrochloride together with combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 12 locations

  • Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia with Genomic Deletion 11q

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well metformin hydrochloride works in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia that has come back or untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia with genomic deletion 11q. Metformin hydrochloride may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Metformin and Nelfinavir in Treating Patients with Relapsed and / or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of metformin and nelfinavir in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Metformin may stop the growth of tumor cells by disrupting the energy source within multiple myeloma cells. Nelfinavir may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving metformin and nelfinavir may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Chemotherapy with or without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without metformin hydrochloride work in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, carboplatin, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and pegfilgrastim, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Metformin hydrochloride may prevent or lower risk of breast cancer and decrease cancer cells, lower risk of cancer spreading. It is not yet known whether giving metformin hydrochloride with chemotherapy will work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Metformin Hydrochloride in Mitigating Side Effects of Radioactive Iodine Treatment in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    This phase II pilot trial studies how will metformin hydrochloride works in mitigating the side effects of radioactive iodine treatment in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Metformin hydrochloride may reduce the metabolic activity of cancer cell and of surrounding supportive tissues.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Metformin Hydrochloride in Preventing Breast Cancer in Patients with Atypical Hyperplasia or In Situ Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies metformin hydrochloride to see how well it works compared to placebo in preventing breast cancer in patients with atypical hyperplasia or in situ breast cancer. Chemoprevention is the use of certain drugs to keep cancer from forming. The use of metformin hydrochloride may prevent breast cancer.
    Location: 24 locations

  • Weight Loss or Metformin Hydrochloride in Reducing IGF-1 Hormone in Cancer Survivors

    This clinical trial compares how well weight loss or metformin hydrochloride work in reducing levels of the hormone insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in cancer survivors, and how well a coached weight loss program works compared with self-directed weight loss. High levels of IGF-1 is linked to the growth of cancer or the return of cancer in cancer survivors. Studying different strategies of weight loss and medication with metformin hydrochloride to see how they affect IGF-1 levels may help doctors learn more about IGF-1 and the best way to lower levels of this hormone.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Effects of Metformin Hydrochloride in Participants with Malignant Solid Tumors

    This early phase I trial studies the effects of metformin hydrochloride in participants with malignant solid tumors. Metformin, a drug typically used for the treatment of diabetes, may help to reduce the growth of cancerous tumor cells in participants with malignant solid tumors.
    Location: Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire