Clinical Trials Using Methotrexate

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Methotrexate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 80

  • Transarterial Chemoperfusion: Cisplatin, Methotrexate, Gemcitabine for Unresectable Pleural Mesothelioma

    This phase II trial studies how well cisplatin, methotrexate, and gemcitabine hydrochloride given via transarterial perfusion work in treating patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma that cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, methotrexate, and gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Transarterial chemoperfusion is a procedure that allows chemotherapy agents, such as cisplatin, methotrexate and gemcitabine hydrochloride, to be directly injected into the arteries that supply blood to the area where the tumor is located. Transarterial chemoperfusion with cisplatin, methotrexate, and gemcitabine hydrochloride may be an effective treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Romidepsin in Conditioning and Maintenance in Patients with T-cell Leukemia or Lymphoma Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of romidepsin when given together with busulfan and fludarabine phosphate before donor stem cell transplant (SCT) (conditioning) and alone after SCT (maintenance) in treating patients with T-cell leukemia or lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as romidepsin, busulfan, and fludarabine phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving romidepsin together with busulfan and fludarabine phosphate may help prevent the patient's body from rejecting transplanted cells, and help kill any cancer cells that are in the body. Maintenance romidepsin may keep the cancer cells from coming back after the transplant.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Study of Palifermin (Kepivance) in Persons Undergoing Unrelated Donor Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Background: - In allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), stem cells are taken from a donor and given to a recipient. Sometimes the recipient s immune system destroys the donor s cells. Or donor immune cells attack the recipient s tissues, called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This is less likely when the recipient and donor have similar human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Researchers want to see if the drug palifermin improves the results of allogeneic SCT from HLA-matched unrelated donors. Objective: - To see if high doses of palifermin before chemotherapy are safe, prevent chronic GVHD, and improve immune function after transplant. Eligibility: - Adults 18 years of age or older with blood or bone marrow cancer with no HLA-matched sibling, but with a possible HLA-matched donor. Design: - Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and blood and urine tests. They will have scans and heart and lung exams. - Before transplant, participants will: - Have many tests and exams. These include blood tests throughout the study and bone marrow biopsy. - Get a central line catheter if they do not have one. - Have 1-3 rounds of chemotherapy. - Take more tests to make sure they can have the transplant, including medical history, physical exam, and CT scan. - Get palifermin by IV and more chemotherapy. They will get other drugs, some they will take for 6 months. - Participants will get the SCT. - After transplant, participants will: - Be hospitalized at least 3-4 weeks. - Have tests for GVHD at 60 days and 6 months. These include mouth and skin photos and biopsies. - Stay near D.C. for 3 months. - Visit NIH 5 times the first 2 years, then yearly. They may have scans and biopsies.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • JAK Inhibitor before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Primary or Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This phase II trial studies how well giving a JAK inhibitor before a donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with myelofibrosis that developed without another condition (primary) or evolved from other bone marrow disorders (secondary). JAK inhibitors are a class of drugs that may stop the growth of abnormal cells by blocking an enzyme needed for cell growth. Giving a JAK inhibitor such as ruxolitinib before a donor stem cell transplant may help reduce symptoms of myelofibrosis such as inflammation and enlargement of the spleen, improve the patient’s general physical condition, and prevent complications from occurring after the transplant. Infusing healthy stem cells from a donor into the patient may help the patient's bone marrow work normally and make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving a JAK inhibitor before a donor stem cell transplant may help improve transplant outcomes in patients with myelofibrosis.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Organ-Sparing Marrow-Targeted Irradiation before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of organ-sparing marrow-targeted irradiation before stem cell transplant in treating patients with high-risk hematological malignancies. Total-body irradiation (TBI) is used to treat patients before an allogeneic stem cell transplant (where patients receive stem cells from another person) to eliminate leukemia cells. Newer radiation therapy can shape the radiation beam so that normal organs can be shielded, but the radiation will still reach other sites where leukemic cells exist. This type of radiation, called organ-sparing marrow-targeted irradiation (OSMI), may help more people benefit from the same dose of radiation as TBI without as many side effects.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Ponatinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy and ponatinib hydrochloride work in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Ponatinib hydrochloride may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy and ponatinib hydrochloride may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients with Previously Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin and to see how well it works when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating older patients with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called N-acetyl-gamma-calicheamicin dimethyl hydrazide (CalichDMH). Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers CalichDMH to kill them. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin together with combination chemotherapy may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Severe Aplastic Anemia and Other Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes Using G-CSF Mobilized CD34+ Selected Hematopoietic Precursor Cells Co-Infused With a Reduced Dose of Non-Mobilized Donor T-cells

    Background: - Stem cell transplants from related donors (allogenic stem cell transplants) can be used to treat individuals with certain kinds of severe blood diseases or cancers, such as severe anemia. Allogenic stem cell transplants encourage the growth of new bone marrow to replace that of the recipient. Because stem cell transplants can have serious complications, researchers are interested in developing new approaches to stem cell transplants that will reduce the likelihood of these complications. - By reducing the number of white blood cells included in the blood taken during the stem cell collection process, and replacing them with a smaller amount of white blood cells collected prior to stem cell donation, the stem cell transplant may be less likely to cause severe complications for the recipient. Researchers are investigating whether altering the stem cell transplant donation procedure in this manner will improve the likelihood of a successful stem cell transplant with fewer complications. Objectives: - To evaluate a new method of stem cell transplantation that may reduce the possibly of severe side effects or transplant rejection in the recipient. Eligibility: - Recipient: Individuals between 4 and 80 years of age who have been diagnosed with a blood disease that can be treated with allogenic stem cell transplants. - Donor: Individuals between 4 and 80 years of age who are related to the recipient and are eligible to donate blood. OR unrelated donors found through the National Marrow Donor Program. Design: - All participants will be screened with a physical examination and medical history. - DONORS: - Donors will undergo an initial apheresis procedure to donate white blood cells. - After the initial donation, donors will receive injections of filgrastim to release bone marrow cells into the blood. - After 5 days of filgrastim injections, donors will have apheresis again to donate stem cells that are present in the blood. - RECIPIENTS: - Recipients will provide an initial donation of white blood cells to be used for research purposes only. - From 7 days before the stem cell transplant, participants will be admitted to the inpatient unit of the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center and will receive regular doses of cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, and anti-thymocyte globulin to suppress their immune system and prepare for the transplant. - After the initial chemotherapy, participants will receive the donated white blood cells and stem cells as a single infusion. - After the stem cell and white blood cell transplant, participants will have regular doses of cyclosporine and methotrexate to prevent rejection of the donor cells. Participants will have three doses of methotrexate within the week after the transplant, but will continue to take cyclosporine for up to 4 months after the transplant. - Participants will remain in inpatient care for up to 1 month after the transplant, and will be followed with regular visits for up to 3 years with periodic visits thereafter to evaluate the success of the transplant and any side effects.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Nelarabine in Treating Patients with T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy and nelarabine work in treating patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, dexamethasone, methotrexate, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, prednisone, pegaspargase, nelarabine, and venetoclax work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Methotrexate, Mannitol, Rituximab, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of methotrexate, mannitol, rituximab, and carboplatin and to see how well they work in treating patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption uses mannitol to open the blood vessels around the brain and allow cancer-killing substances to be carried directly to the brain. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving methotrexate, mannitol, rituximab, and carboplatin together may be an effective treatment for primary central nervous system lymphoma.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • R-MPV Followed by Nivolumab in Older (≥65) Pts With Previously Untreated Primary CNS Lymphoma

    The primary objective of Stage 1 is to evaluate the safety of nivolumab consolidation after R-MPV induction chemotherapy in older subjects with previously untreated PCNSL in terms of a tolerated dose (based on dose-limiting toxicities) for the expansion phase of the study (Stage 2). The primary objective of Stage 2 is to evaluate the efficacy of nivolumab consolidation after R-MPV induction chemotherapy in terms of the 2-year progression-free survival rate.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Different Therapies in Treating Infants With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine, methotrexate, leucovorin, and antithymocyte globulin before and after transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is most effective in treating acute leukemia. PURPOSE: This randomized clinical trial is studying how well different therapies work in treating infants with newly diagnosed acute leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • ANG1005 in Leptomeningeal Disease From Breast Cancer

    This is an open-label Phase 3 study to see if ANG1005 can prolong survival compared to a Physician Best Choice control in HER2-negative breast cancer patients with newly diagnosed leptomeningeal disease and previously treated brain metastases.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and Combination Chemotherapy before Surgery for the Treatment of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and combination chemotherapy before surgery work for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, vinblastine, adriamycin, and cisplatin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab and combination chemotherapy before surgery may work better in treating patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Ruxolitinib for the Treatment of Graft Versus Host Disease Following Stem Cell Transplant in Patients with Primary and Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This phase II trial studies how well administering ruxolitinib before, during, and after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation works in preventing graft versus host disease and improving transplant outcomes in patients with primary and secondary myelofibrosis. Donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently the only treatment with proven curative potential for myelofibrosis, however, myelofibrosis patients have a high risk for developing graft versus host disease post-transplant. Graft versus host disease is a condition where the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells. Ruxolitinib, a janus-associated kinase (JAK) inhibitor, is known to decrease inflammatory signals, which may reduce spleen size and decrease symptoms such as night sweats and weight loss. Administering ruxolitinib before, during, and after transplant may decrease the incidence and severity of graft versus host disease, increase survival, and improve quality of life in patients with primary and secondary myelofibrosis.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Venetoclax, SL-401, and Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    This phase II trial studies how well venetoclax, SL-401, and chemotherapy works in treating patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Venetoclax may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. SL-401 is a recombinant protein consisting of IL-3 linked to a toxic agent called DT. IL-3 attaches to IL-3 receptors on tumor cells in a targeted way and delivers DT to kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax and SL-401 with chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for patients with blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Comparing ATG or Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide to Calcineurin Inhibitor-Methotrexate as GVHD Prophylaxis after Myeloablative Unrelated Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase II trial studies how well 3 different drug combinations prevent graft versus host disease (GVHD) after donor stem cell transplant. Calcineurin inhibitors, such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, may stop the activity of donor cells that can cause GVHD. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cyclophosphamide and methotrexate, may also stop the donor cells that can lead to GVHD while not affecting the cancer-fighting donor cells. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), is used to decrease the body's immune response and reduces the risk of GVHD. It is not yet known which combination of drugs: 1) ATG, methotrexate, and calcineurin inhibitor 2) cyclophosphamide and calcineurin inhibitor, or 3) methotrexate and calcineurin inhibitor may work best to prevent graft versus host disease and result in best overall outcome after donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Rituximab Hyaluronidase in Combination with Chemotherapy in Treating Aggressive B-cell Lymphoma in Uganda

    This phase I trial studies how well rituximab hyaluronidase and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients in Uganda with Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus associated multicentric Castleman disease. Rituximab hyaluronidase is a combination of rituximab and hyaluronidase. Rituximab binds to a molecule called CD20, which is found on B cells (a type of white blood cell) and some types of cancer cells. This may help the immune system kill cancer cells. Hyaluronidase allows rituximab to be given by injection under the skin. Giving rituximab and hyaluronidase by injection under the skin is faster than giving rituximab alone by infusion into the blood. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine, methotrexate, etoposide, doxorubicin, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. While rituximab has a clear survival benefit in patients within developed countries, differences in supportive care and infectious co-morbidities require special attention. Giving rituximab hyaluronidase alone or in combination with chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus associated multicentric Castleman disease compared to chemotherapy alone in Uganda.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Regorafenib and Methotrexate in Treating Participants with Recurrent or Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well regorafenib works together with methotrexate in treating participants with non-small cell lung cancer that has come back or spread to other places. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as regorafenib, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Methotrexate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving regorafenib and methotrexate may work better in treating participants with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Molecular Profile of Breast Cancer in Ugandan Patients with Stage IIB-III Breast Cancer

    This phase I trials studies the molecular profile of breast cancer in Ugandan patients with stage IIB-III breast cancer. Creating a molecular profile of breast cancer my help doctors learn more about biological factors associated with breast cancer in Ugandan patients with as well as measure the benefits of locally available diagnostic studies and the possibility of providing treatment via oral medication.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Selective Depletion of CD45RA+ T Cells from Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Grafts from HLA-Matched Related and Unrelated Donors in Preventing GVHD

    This phase II trial is for patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or chronic myeloid leukemia who have been referred for a peripheral blood stem cell transplantation to treat their cancer. In these transplants, chemotherapy and total-body radiotherapy ('conditioning') are used to kill residual leukemia cells and the patient's normal blood cells, especially immune cells that could reject the donor cells. Following the chemo / radiotherapy, blood stem cells from the donor are infused. These stem cells will grow and eventually replace the patient's original blood system, including red cells that carry oxygen to our tissues, platelets that stop bleeding from damaged vessels, and multiple types of immune-system white blood cells that fight infections. Mature donor immune cells, especially a type of immune cell called T lymphocytes (or T cells) are transferred along with these blood-forming stem cells. T cells are a major part of the curative power of transplantation because they can attack leukemia cells that have survived the chemo / radiation therapy and also help to fight infections after transplantation. However, donor T cells can also attack a patient's healthy tissues in an often-dangerous condition known as Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (GVHD). Drugs that suppress immune cells are used to decrease the severity of GVHD; however, they are incompletely effective and prolonged immunosuppression used to prevent and treat GVHD significantly increases the risk of serious infections. Removing all donor T cells from the transplant graft can prevent GVHD, but doing so also profoundly delays infection-fighting immune reconstitution and eliminates the possibility that donor immune cells will kill residual leukemia cells. Work in animal models found that depleting a type of T cell, called naive T cells or T cells that have never responded to an infection, can diminish GVHD while at least in part preserving some of the benefits of donor T cells including resistance to infection and the ability to kill leukemia cells. This clinical trial studies how well the selective removal of naive T cells works in preventing GVHD after peripheral blood stem cell transplants. This study will include patients conditioned with high or medium intensity chemo / radiotherapy who can receive donor grafts from related or unrelated donors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Intensive Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well intensive combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, prednisone, leucovorin calcium, cytarabine, etoposide, and liposomal cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as mercaptopurine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Dietary supplements, such as levocarnitine, may reduce the incidence of liver damage. Pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy with, rituximab, mercaptopurine, levocarnitine, pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin or Crizotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin or crizotinib and combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, called brentuximab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Brentuximab attaches to CD30 positive cancer cells in targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Crizotinib and methotrexate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy is more effective than crizotinib and combination chemotherapy in treating anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
    Location: 144 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients with Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy with or without rituximab works in treating younger patients with stage III-IV non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibody, such as rituximab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy together with rituximab is more effective in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Allopurinol as a Modifier of Mercaptopurine Metabolism in Younger Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies how well allopurinol works in increasing the metabolism of mercaptopurine in younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. A common side effect of treatments for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia lymphoblastic lymphoma, such as mercaptopurine, is increased absolute neutrophil counts. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cells that help the body fight infection. Allopurinol may increase the metabolism of mercaptopurine, creating a more active metabolic form that increases therapeutic response. Making mercaptopurine more effective could lower the doses required to treat younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and may safely decrease the absolute neutrophil count. It may also decrease the side effects of mercaptopurine treatment by reducing the toxicity damage to the liver (hepatotoxicity). Giving allopurinol with mercaptopurine may increase the effectiveness and safety of mercaptopurine treatment in younger patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations