Clinical Trials Using Midostaurin

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Midostaurin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-9 of 9
  • Azacitidine with or without Nivolumab or Midostaurin, or Decitabine and Cytarabine Alone in Treating Older Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well azacitidine with or without nivolumab or midostaurin, or decitabine and cytarabine alone work in treating older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, decitabine, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Midostaurin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving azacitidine with or without nivolumab or midostaurin, or decitabine and cytarabine alone may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 143 locations

  • Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Midostaurin in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of midostaurin when given together with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Midostaurin may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving radiation therapy and chemotherapy together with midostaurin may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Cytarabine and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of cytarabine and daunorubicin hydrochloride and to see how well they work in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cytarabine and daunorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading, and may be safer for the heart.
    Location: Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

  • Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    This phase II trial studies how well midostaurin and decitabine work in treating older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia and FLT3 mutations. Midostaurin and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Decitabine and Midostaurin in Treating Older Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well decitabine and midostaurin work in treating older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Decitabine and midostaurin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • A Safety and Efficacy Study of LGH447 in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS)

    This study will assess the safety and preliminary efficacy of escalating doses of LGH447 monotherapy in AML and MDS and LGH447 in combination with midostaurin in AML.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Study of Crenolanib vs Midostaurin Following Induction Chemotherapy and Consolidation Therapy in Newly Diagnosed FLT3 Mutated AML

    A phase III randomized multi-center study designed to compare the efficacy of crenolanib with that of midostaurin when administered following induction chemotherapy, consolidation chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation in newly diagnosed AML subjects with FLT3 mutation. About 510 subjects will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive either crenolanib in addition to standard first line treatment of AML (chemotherapy and if eligible, transplantation) (arm A) or midostaurin and standard treatment (arm B). Potentially eligible subjects will be registered and tested for the presence of FLT3 mutation. Once the FLT3 mutation status is confirmed and additional eligibility is established, subject will be randomized and enter into the treatment phase.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Midostaurin in Treating Older Patients with Mutated Acute Myeloid Leukemia Post-Transplant

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well midostaurin works in treating older patients with acute myeloid leukemia with change in genetic material post-hematopoietic cell transplantation. Midostaruin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving midostaruin post-transplant may improve patient outcomes.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Standard of Care + / - Midostaurin to Prevent Relapse Post Stem Cell Transplant in Patients With FLT3-ITD Mutated AML

    To determine if the addition of midostaurin (PKC412) to Standard of Care (SOC) therapy reduces relapse in FLT3-ITD mutated AML patients receiving an allogenetic hematopoietic stem cell transplant,
    Location: 6 locations