Clinical Trials Using Mycophenolate Mofetil

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Mycophenolate Mofetil. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-72 of 72

  • Targeting the IPA and Matching for the Non-Inherited Maternal Antigen for Haplo-Cord Transplantation

    In this trial, we aim to improve the outcomes of haplo cord transplant. Haplo cord transplant is a novel and promising way to improve transplant outcomes. We hypothesize that identification of a graft that is at least 5 / 6 matched and inherited paternal antigen (IPA) targeted (i.e., cord blood grafts share one or more IPA antigens with the prospective recipient) is more important to the outcome of haplo cord transplant than the nucleated cell dose. The identification of such a graft for a large proportion of the subjects may necessitate accepting a lower umbilical cord graft dose. In addition to a umbilical cord blood transplant, recipients will receive stem cells from a family member ( a haplo-identical donor) . After collection and prior to infusion, these cells will be purified using a device called a CliniMACS CD34 selection device. The subject will undergo a chemotherapy conditioning regimen prior to transplantation. No experimental drugs are used in this study, and the combinations of drugs that will be used in the conditioning regimen are combinations that have been used in the past.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor bone marrow transplant works in treating patients with solid tumors that are likely to recur (come back) or spread. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells when they do not exactly match the patient's blood. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Reduced-Intensity Conditioning before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies reduced-intensity conditioning before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies. Giving low-doses of chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Giving an infusion of the donor’s T cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) before the transplant may help increase this effect.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Clofarabine, and Busulfan before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gemcitabine hydrochloride, clofarabine, and busulfan before donor stem cell transplant and to see how well it works in treating patients with B-cell or T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma that does not respond to treatment. Giving chemotherapy before a donor bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Natural Killer Cells and Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best way to give natural killer cells and donor umbilical cord blood transplant in treating patients with hematological malignancies. Giving chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well reduced intensity donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening. Once the donated stem cells begin working, the patient's immune system may see the remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them. Giving an infusion of the donor's white blood cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) may boost this effect.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Low-Dose Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and the best way to give low-dose donor bone marrow transplant (BMT) and to see how well it works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving low-doses of chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's bone marrow cells. When the healthy stem cells from a related or unrelated donor, that do not exactly match the patient's blood, are infused into the patient they may help patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) after transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Pilot Study of Reduced-Intensity Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant of DOCK8 Deficiency

    Background: -DOCK8 deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects the immune system and can lead to severe recurrent infections and possible death from infections or certain types of cancers, including blood cancers. A stem cell transplant is a life-saving treatment for this condition. In this study we are evaluating the efficacy and safety of transplant from different donor sources for DOCK8 deficiency. The donors that we are using are matched siblings, matched unrelated donors, and half-matched donors, so called haploidentical related donors, such as as mothers or fathers or half-matched siblings. Objectives: -To determine whether transplant of bone marrow cells from different types of donors corrects DOCK8 deficiency. Eligibility: - Donors: Healthy individuals between 2 and 60 years of age who are matched with a recipient. - Recipient: Individuals between 5 and 40 years of age who have DOCK8 deficiency, have suffered one or more life-threatening infections, or have had certain viral related cancers of cancer and have a stem cell donor. Design: - All participants will be screened with a physical examination and medical history. - DONORS: - Donors will donate bone marrow cells or blood stem cells. If donating blood stem cells, donors will receive injections of filgrastim to release stem cells into the blood. After 5 days of filgrastim injections, donors will have apheresis to donate stem cells and white blood cells that are present in the blood. - Donors who provide the stem cells through bone marrow donation will have their bone marrow cells harvested in the operating room. - RECIPIENTS: - Recipients receiving matched related or unrelated donors will receive 4 days of chemotherapy with busulfan and fludarabine to suppress their immune system and prepare them for the transplant. Donors receiving haploidentical related donors will receive two doses of chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, 5 days of fludarabine, 3 days of busulfan, and one dose of radiation to suppress their immune system and prepare them for the transplant. - After the initial chemotherapy and radiation, recipients will receive the donated stem cells as a single infusion. Recipients may also receive white blood cells from their stem cell donor to encourage acceptance of the stem cells. - After the stem cell transplant, recipients will receive two days of a chemotherapy called cyclophosphamide on day's + 3 and + 4 followed by two drugs tacrolimus and mycophenolate to prevent graft versus host disease where the donor cells attack the patient's body. All patients will remain in the hospital for approximately 1 month, and will be followed with regular visits for up to 3 years with periodic visits thereafter to evaluate the success of the transplant and any side effects.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Reduced Intensity Conditioning Regimen for the Treatment of Non-Malignant Disorders

    This phase II trial studies how well a reduced intensity conditioning regimen works in treating patients with non-cancer (non-malignant) disorders. Reduced intensity conditioning involves giving medicines that suppress the immune system before giving the donor stem cells. It does not completely eliminate the blood making cells in bone marrow. Giving a reduced intensity conditioning regimen may result in fewer short and long term side effects, shorter hospital stay than after conditioning that completely destroys the bone marrow, and blood counts may recover more quickly.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well donor peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplant works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Cyclophosphamide when added to tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil is safe and effective in preventing severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in most patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing transplantation of bone marrow from half-matched (haploidentical) donors. This approach has extended the transplant option to patients who do not have matched related or unrelated donors, especially for patients from ethnic minority groups. The graft contains cells of the donor's immune system which potentially can recognize and destroy the patient's cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Rejection of the donor's cells by the patient's own immune system is prevented by giving low doses of chemotherapy (fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide) and total-body irradiation before transplant. Patients can experience low blood cell counts after transplant. Using stem cells and immune cells collected from the donor's circulating blood may result in quicker recovery of blood counts and may be more effective in treating the patient's disease than using bone marrow.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Donor Transplant, Total Lymphoid Irradiation, and Antithymocyte Globulin in Treating Patients with Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well donor transplant, total lymphoid irradiation, and antithymocyte globulin works in treating patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma. Giving total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also help the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving antithymocyte globulin before transplant and tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil after transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant, Cyclophosphamide, Fludarabine, and Total-Body Irradiation in Treating Patients with Hematologic Disease

    This phase II trial studies how well giving an umbilical cord blood transplant together with cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, and total-body irradiation (TBI) works in treating patients with hematologic disease. Giving chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, and TBI before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cancer and abnormal cells and helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil after transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Busulfan, Anti-thymocyte Globulin, and Total-Body Irradiation before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Leukemia

    This clinical trial studies fludarabine phosphate, busulfan, anti-thymocyte globulin, and total-body irradiation before donor stem cell transplantation in treating younger patients with leukemia. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: Lurie Children's Hospital-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

  • Antithymocyte Globulin, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Sickle Cell Anemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well giving antithymocyte globulin, fludarabine phosphate, and cyclophosphamide together with total body-irradiation (TBI) followed by a donor bone marrow transplant (BMT) works in treating patients with sickle cell anemia. Giving chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, and TBI before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of abnormal cells. It also stops the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving antithymocyte globulin before transplant and sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) after transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Busulfan, Melphalan, and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies how well giving busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine phosphate together followed by a donor umbilical cord blood transplant works in treating younger patients with acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is likely to recur (come back), or spread. Giving chemotherapy drugs, such as busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine phosphate, before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine before and after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Crohn's Allogeneic Transplant Study

    This phase II trial studies how well giving a donor bone marrow transplant (BMT) works in treating patients with refractory Crohn's Disease. We will select patients with severe Crohn's Disease and active inflammation despite the best medical and surgical treatments. These patients must be healthy enough to undergo a transplantation procedure. They cannot have an active infection, and their heart, lungs, kidneys, and liver cannot be failing. The transplant procedure starts with chemotherapy and a small dose of radiation, to weaken a patient's immune system so that it will accept bone marrow cells from another person. After that other person's bone marrow cells are given to the patient, immune suppressive medicines are given to prevent the new cells from being rejected and to stop those cells from damaging the patient. After the new donor cells start to work, blood counts will rise and the new immune system will start to grow. During this time, there is a risk of infection. Antibiotics and anti-viral drugs will be given to prevent infection. When the new donor cells are well-established, immune suppressive medicines are discontinued. We will examine parts of the intestine that were inflamed before the start of the transplant procedure, to be sure the Crohn's Disease has disappeared after the transplant. Patients will be formally evaluated for Crohn's activity at around 100 days after transplant, and yearly after that for 5 years.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Tacrolimus and Methotrexate with or without Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host-Disease in Patients with Hematological Malignancy Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase III randomized clinical trial studies tacrolimus and methotrexate with or without mycophenolate mofetil in preventing graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) in patients with hematological malignancy undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Tacrolimus, methotrexate, and mycophenolate mofetil may be an effective treatment for graft-versus-host disease caused by stem cell transplant. It is not yet known whether tacrolimus and methotrexate is more effective with or without mycophenolate mofetil in preventing GVHD.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Regulatory T-Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Suppressing Acute Graft-Versus-Host-Disease after Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well regulatory T-lymphocytes and aldesleukin work in suppressing acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) after umbilical cord blood transplant in patients with hematological malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving regulatory T-lymphocytes and aldesleukin after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • TAC / MTX vs. TAC / MMF / PTCY for Prevention of Graft-versus-Host Disease and Microbiome and Immune Reconstitution Study (BMT CTN 1703 / 1801)

    1703: The study is designed as a randomized, phase III, multicenter trial comparing two acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) prophylaxis regimens: tacrolimus / methotrexate (Tac / MTX) versus post-transplant cyclophosphamide / tacrolimus / mycophenolate mofetil (PTCy / Tac / MMF) in the setting of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation. 1801: The goal of this protocol is to test the primary hypothesis that the engraftment stool microbiome diversity predicts one-year non-relapse mortality in patients undergoing reduced intensity allogeneic HCT.
    Location: 17 locations

  • GRAVITAS-119: Itacitinib in Combination With Calcineurin Inhibitor-Based Interventions for the Prophylaxis of Graft-Versus Host Disease

    The purpose of this study is to assess the impact and safety of itacitinib in combination with calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-based interventions for the prophylaxis of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD).
    Location: 4 locations

  • Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, and Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide in Reducing Rates of Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase Ib / II trial studies how well chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and post-transplant cyclophosphamide work in reducing rates of graft versus host disease in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and melphalan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • High Dose Cyclophosphamide, Tacrolimus, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Myeloablative or Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well high dose cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil work in preventing graft versus host disease in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing myeloablative or reduced intensity donor stem cell transplant. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving high dose cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California