Clinical Trials Using Mycophenolate Mofetil

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Mycophenolate Mofetil. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-69 of 69

  • Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well donor peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplant works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Cyclophosphamide when added to tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil is safe and effective in preventing severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in most patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing transplantation of bone marrow from half-matched (haploidentical) donors. This approach has extended the transplant option to patients who do not have matched related or unrelated donors, especially for patients from ethnic minority groups. The graft contains cells of the donor's immune system which potentially can recognize and destroy the patient's cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Rejection of the donor's cells by the patient's own immune system is prevented by giving low doses of chemotherapy (fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide) and total-body irradiation before transplant. Patients can experience low blood cell counts after transplant. Using stem cells and immune cells collected from the donor's circulating blood may result in quicker recovery of blood counts and may be more effective in treating the patient's disease than using bone marrow.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant, Cyclophosphamide, Fludarabine, and Total-Body Irradiation in Treating Patients with Hematologic Disease

    This phase II trial studies how well giving an umbilical cord blood transplant together with cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, and total-body irradiation (TBI) works in treating patients with hematologic disease. Giving chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, and TBI before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cancer and abnormal cells and helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil after transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Busulfan, Anti-thymocyte Globulin, and Total-Body Irradiation before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Leukemia

    This clinical trial studies fludarabine phosphate, busulfan, anti-thymocyte globulin, and total-body irradiation before donor stem cell transplantation in treating younger patients with leukemia. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: Lurie Children's Hospital-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

  • Busulfan, Melphalan, and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies how well giving busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine phosphate together followed by a donor umbilical cord blood transplant works in treating younger patients with acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is likely to recur (come back), or spread. Giving chemotherapy drugs, such as busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine phosphate, before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine before and after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Reduced Intensity Haploidentical Transplantation for the Treatment of Primary or Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This phase II trial studies the outcomes of using a JAK inhibitor prior to reduced intensity haploidentical (Haplo) transplantation for the treatment of primary or secondary myelofibrosis (MF). Haplo transplant has been shown to be safe and effective in patients with leukemia and lymphoma who don’t have an available sibling donor. The primary risk of using Haplo HCT in patients with MF is graft failure as the graft failure rate has been historically higher with Haplo HCT than with other donor sources and higher with MF patients due to bone marrow fibrosis than in patients with other hematologic malignancies. JAK inhibitors when used in patients with MF may decrease the size of the spleen and decrease inflammation in the bone marrow. Therefore using a JAK inhibitor prior to Haplo transplant has the potential to decrease graft failure in patients with MF. Haplo transplants for patients with MF have been done successfully at multiple institutions in patients not on a study and are currently being covered by Medicare.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant for People With Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    Background: During a transplant, blood stem cells from one person are given to someone else. The cells grow into the different cells that make up the immune system. This can cure people with certain immunodeficiencies. But transplant has many risks and complications. Objective: To see if stem cell transplant can be successfully performed in people with primary immunodeficiency disease and cure them. Eligibility: People ages 4-69 for whom a primary immunodeficiency has caused significant health problems and either standard management has not worked or there are no standard management options, along with their donors Design: Donors will be screened under protocol 01-C-0129. They will donate blood or bone marrow. Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood, urine, and heart tests CT or PET scans Before transplant, participants will have dental and eye exams. They will have a bone marrow biopsy. For this, a needle will be inserted through the skin into the pelvis to remove marrow. Participants will be hospitalized before their transplant. They will have a central catheter put into a vein in their chest or neck. They will get medications through the catheter to prevent complications. Participants will get stem cells through the catheter. They will stay in the hospital for at least 4 weeks. They will give blood, urine, bone marrow, and stool samples. They may need blood transfusions. They may need more scans. They will take more medications. Participants will have visits on days 30, 60, 100, 180, and 360, and 24 months after the transplant. Then they will have visits once a year for about 5 years
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant with Treosulfan, Fludarabine, and Total-Body Irradiation for the Treatment of Hematological Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor stem cell transplant, treosulfan, fludarabine, and total-body irradiation work in treating patients with blood cancers (hematological malignancies). Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Ruxolitinib for the Treatment of Graft Versus Host Disease Following Stem Cell Transplant in Patients with Primary and Secondary Myelofibrosis

    This phase II trial studies how well administering ruxolitinib before, during, and after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation works in preventing graft versus host disease and improving transplant outcomes in patients with primary and secondary myelofibrosis. Donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently the only treatment with proven curative potential for myelofibrosis, however, myelofibrosis patients have a high risk for developing graft versus host disease post-transplant. Graft versus host disease is a condition where the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells. Ruxolitinib, a janus-associated kinase (JAK) inhibitor, is known to decrease inflammatory signals, which may reduce spleen size and decrease symptoms such as night sweats and weight loss. Administering ruxolitinib before, during, and after transplant may decrease the incidence and severity of graft versus host disease, increase survival, and improve quality of life in patients with primary and secondary myelofibrosis.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation as Conditioning Regimen before Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well total marrow and lymphoid irradiation works as a conditioning regimen before hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or acute leukemia. Total body irradiation can lower the relapse rate but has some fatal side effects such as irreversible damage to normal internal organs and graft-versus-host disease (a complication after transplantation in which donor's immune cells recognize the host as foreign and attack the recipient's tissues). Total body irradiation is a form of radiotherapy that involves irradiating the patient's entire body in an attempt to suppress the immune system, prevent rejection of the transplanted bone marrow and / or stem cells and to wipe out any remaining cancer cells. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a more recently developed method of delivering radiation. Total marrow and lymphoid irradiation is a method of using IMRT to direct radiation to the bone marrow. Total marrow and lymphoid irradiation may allow a greater dose of radiation to be delivered to the bone marrow as a preparative regimen before hematopoietic cell transplant while causing less side effects to normal organs than standard total body irradiation.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Reduce Intensity Conditioning Donor Stem Cell Transplant for the Treatment of Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well a reduced intensity conditioning regimen after donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back (relapsed). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving a reduced intensity conditioning regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and daratumumab after donor stem cell transplant may improve survival and reduce the risk of multiple myeloma coming back.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Total Body Irradiation and Astatine-211-Labeled BC8-B10 Monoclonal Antibody for the Treatment of Nonmalignant Diseases

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose of total body irradiation with astatine-211 BC8-B10 monoclonal antibody for the treatment of patients with nonmalignant diseases undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant. Radiation therapy uses high energy gamma rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Astatine-211-labeled BC8-B10 monoclonal antibody is a monoclonal antibody, called anti-CD45 monoclonal antibody BC8-B10, linked to a radioactive / toxic agent called astatine 211. Anti-CD45 monoclonal antibody BC8-B10 is attached to CD45 antigen positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers astatine 211 to kill them. Giving astatine-211 BC8-B10 monoclonal antibody and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • An Investigational Graft Processing Procedure (ApoGraft) for the Prevention of Acute Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of an investigational graft processing procedure (ApoGraft) in preventing acute graft versus host disease in patients undergoing a stem cell transplant. A stem cell is a type of cell found in the blood or bone marrow which helps form more blood cells. The purpose of a stem cell transplant is to use the stem cells from a healthy donor to replace the diseased bone marrow in the recipient. One of the side effects of a stem cell transplant is the development of graft versus host disease (GVHD). GVHD occurs when some of the cells from the donor attack the recipient’s tissues, resulting in mild, moderate, or even life-threatening side effects to the recipient’s skin, stomach, intestine, and liver. A haploidentical (half-matched related) stem cell transplant is a type of transplant that occurs when the person who needs a transplant can’t find a donor who exactly matches their tissue type (either among family members or through a matched unrelated donor). When no matched donor is available, haploidentical donors may be used. The purpose of this study is to see how well using ApoGraft in processing stem cells works to prevent or lessen the effects of GVHD while still effectively treating the disease in patients receiving a haploidentical stem cell transplant.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Abbreviated Mycophenolate Mofetil and Sargramostim after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High Risk or Recurrent Hematological Malignancies

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well a shortened course of treatment with mycophenolate mofetil after stem cell transplant works when given with sargramostim in treating patients with a cancer that affects the blood or bone marrow (hematological malignancy), and is at high risk for returning or came back after previous treatment (recurrent). Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a condition that may occur after transplant, in which the stem cells that are transplanted from a donor (the "graft") attack the normal cells of the patient (the “host”). Mycophenolate mofetil is used to help prevent GVHD after transplants. Giving mycophenolate mofetil for a shorter period of time may help the transplanted cells engraft with the patient's body more quickly, which may help the patient recover after the transplant. After transplants, colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim, are also given to help keep the bone marrow working to fight infections until it can recover from the transplant. Sargramostim may be a more effective treatment for supporting the bone marrow function than standard treatment with filgrastim. It is not yet known whether giving abbreviated treatment with mycophenolate mofetil and sargramostim is more effective than longer treatment given with filgrastim in treating patients with high risk or recurrent hematological malignancies after transplant.
    Location: Virginia Commonwealth University / Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia

  • Selective Depletion of CD45RA+ T Cells from Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Grafts from HLA-Matched Related and Unrelated Donors in Preventing GVHD

    This phase II trial is for patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or chronic myeloid leukemia who have been referred for a peripheral blood stem cell transplantation to treat their cancer. In these transplants, chemotherapy and total-body radiotherapy ('conditioning') are used to kill residual leukemia cells and the patient's normal blood cells, especially immune cells that could reject the donor cells. Following the chemo / radiotherapy, blood stem cells from the donor are infused. These stem cells will grow and eventually replace the patient's original blood system, including red cells that carry oxygen to our tissues, platelets that stop bleeding from damaged vessels, and multiple types of immune-system white blood cells that fight infections. Mature donor immune cells, especially a type of immune cell called T lymphocytes (or T cells) are transferred along with these blood-forming stem cells. T cells are a major part of the curative power of transplantation because they can attack leukemia cells that have survived the chemo / radiation therapy and also help to fight infections after transplantation. However, donor T cells can also attack a patient's healthy tissues in an often-dangerous condition known as Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (GVHD). Drugs that suppress immune cells are used to decrease the severity of GVHD; however, they are incompletely effective and prolonged immunosuppression used to prevent and treat GVHD significantly increases the risk of serious infections. Removing all donor T cells from the transplant graft can prevent GVHD, but doing so also profoundly delays infection-fighting immune reconstitution and eliminates the possibility that donor immune cells will kill residual leukemia cells. Work in animal models found that depleting a type of T cell, called naive T cells or T cells that have never responded to an infection, can diminish GVHD while at least in part preserving some of the benefits of donor T cells including resistance to infection and the ability to kill leukemia cells. This clinical trial studies how well the selective removal of naive T cells works in preventing GVHD after peripheral blood stem cell transplants. This study will include patients conditioned with high or medium intensity chemo / radiotherapy who can receive donor grafts from related or unrelated donors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Tacrolimus and Methotrexate with or without Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host-Disease in Patients with Hematological Malignancy Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase III randomized clinical trial studies tacrolimus and methotrexate with or without mycophenolate mofetil in preventing graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) in patients with hematological malignancy undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Tacrolimus, methotrexate, and mycophenolate mofetil may be an effective treatment for graft-versus-host disease caused by stem cell transplant. It is not yet known whether tacrolimus and methotrexate is more effective with or without mycophenolate mofetil in preventing GVHD.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Regulatory T-Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Suppressing Acute Graft-Versus-Host-Disease after Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well regulatory T-lymphocytes and aldesleukin work in suppressing acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) after umbilical cord blood transplant in patients with hematological malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving regulatory T-lymphocytes and aldesleukin after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • GRAVITAS-119: Itacitinib in Combination With Calcineurin Inhibitor-Based Interventions for the Prophylaxis of Graft-Versus Host Disease

    The purpose of this study is to assess the impact and safety of itacitinib in combination with calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-based interventions for the prophylaxis of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD).
    Location: 5 locations

  • Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, and Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide in Reducing Rates of Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase Ib / II trial studies how well chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and post-transplant cyclophosphamide work in reducing rates of graft versus host disease in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and melphalan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • High Dose Cyclophosphamide, Tacrolimus, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Myeloablative or Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well high dose cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil work in preventing graft versus host disease in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing myeloablative or reduced intensity donor stem cell transplant. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving high dose cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California