Clinical Trials Using Ofatumumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Ofatumumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-4 of 4
  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Lymphoblastic Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma / Leukemia, or Double-Hit Lymphoma / Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoblastic lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma / leukemia, or double-hit lymphoma / leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as clofarabine, etoposide, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate liposome, dexamethasone and bortezomib, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Blinatumomab, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin, and Combination Chemotherapy as Frontline Therapy in Treating Patients with B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, and combination chemotherapy work as frontline therapy in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, dexamethasone, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, methotrexate, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving blinatumomab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia than chemotherapy alone.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Dose Adjusted EPOCH Regimen in Combination with Ofatumumab or Rituximab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well a dose adjusted regimen consisting of etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (EPOCH) works in combination with ofatumumab or rituximab in treating patients with Burkitt lymphoma that is newly diagnosed, or has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed), or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory) or relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ofatumumab and rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) together with monoclonal antibody therapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Best Available Therapy Versus Autologous Hematopoetic Stem Cell Transplant for Multiple Sclerosis (BEAT-MS)

    This is a multi-center prospective rater-masked (blinded) randomized controlled trial of 156 participants, comparing the treatment strategy of Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (AHSCT) to the treatment strategy of Best Available Therapy (BAT) for treatment-resistant relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants will be randomized at a 1 to 1 (1:1) ratio. All participants will be followed for 72 months after randomization (Day 0, Visit 0).
    Location: 2 locations