Clinical Trials Using Olanzapine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Olanzapine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-3 of 3
  • Olanzapine with or without Fosaprepitant Dimeglumine in Preventing Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Cancer Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy

    This phase III trial studies how well olanzapine with or without fosaprepitant dimeglumine works in preventing chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy that causes vomiting. Olanzapine and fosaprepitant dimeglumine may help control nausea and vomiting in patients during chemotherapy. Olanzapine is usually given in combination with other drugs, including fosaprepitant dimeglumine. It is not yet known if olanzapine, when given with other drugs, is still effective without using fosaprepitant dimeglumine for controlling nausea and vomiting.
    Location: 456 locations

  • Netupitant / Palonosetron Hydrochloride and Dexamethasone with or without Prochlorperazine or Olanzapine in Improving Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients with Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well netupitant / palonosetron hydrochloride and dexamethasone with or without prochlorperazine or olanzapine work in improving chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with breast cancer. Antiemetic drugs, such as prochlorperazine and olanzapine, may help lessen nausea and vomiting in patients with breast cancer treated with chemotherapy.
    Location: 312 locations

  • RCT of Olanzapine for Control of CIV in Children Receiving HSCT Conditioning

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are among the most bothersome symptoms during cancer treatment according to children and their parents. Most children receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) conditioning experience CINV despite receiving antiemetic prophylaxis. Olanzapine improves CINV control in adult cancer patients, has a track record of safe use in children with psychiatric illness, does not interact with chemotherapy and is inexpensive. We hypothesize that the addition of olanzapine to standard antiemetics will improve chemotherapy-induced vomiting (CIV) control in children receiving high dose cyclophosphamide for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) conditioning.
    Location: 2 locations