Clinical Trials Using Osimertinib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Osimertinib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-32 of 32

  • Osimertinib in Combination with Alisertib or Sapanisertib for the Treatment of Osimertinib-Resistant EGFR Mutant Stage IIIB or IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the best dose, safety, and effect of alisertib or sapanisertib, in combination with osimertinib, in treating patients with EGFR mutated stage IIIB or IV non-small cell lung cancer that does not respond to osimertinib treatment (osimertinib resistant). Osimertinib, alisertib, and sapanisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. This study has two parts. The goal of part 1 of this trial is to find the highest tolerable dose of alisertib or sapanisertib in combination with osimertinib that can be safely given to patients with EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancer. The goal of part 2 of this trial is to learn if the dose of alisertib or sapanisertib found in part 1 can help control EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancer when given in combination with osimertinib.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Necitumumab and Trastuzumab in Combination with Osimertinib for the Treatment of Refractory EGFR-Mutated Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial identifies the safety, best dose and activity of trastuzumab, necitumumab in combination with osimertinib for the treatment of stage IV non-small cell lung cancer that is EGFR-mutated, resistant to osimertinib, and has not responded to previous treatment (refractory). Trastuzumab and necitumumab are a form of “targeted therapy” because they work by attaching themselves to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 and EGFR, respectively. When they attach to these receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked, and therefore tumor may stop growing. Osimertinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving trastuzumab and necitumumab in combination with osimertinib may work better than osimertinib alone in treating patients with refractory stage IV EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Osimertinib and Ipilimumab for the Treatment of EGFR-Mutated Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the safety and long term ability to tolerate osimertinib and ipilimumab in patients with EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Osimertinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving osimertinib and ipilimumab may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer compared to osimertinib alone.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • 18F-FDG PET and Osimertinib in Evaluating Glucose Utilization in Patients with EGFR Activated Recurrent Glioblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well fludeoxyglucose F-18 (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and osimertinib works in evaluating glucose utilization in patients with EGFR activated recurrent glioblastoma. Osimertinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. 18F-FDG PET imaging may help to detect changes in tumor glucose utilization, which may allow investigators to obtain an early read out on the impact of osimertinib on recurrent glioblastoma patients whose tumors have EGFR activation.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • MRX-2843 and Osimertinib for the Treatment of Advanced EGFR Mutant Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase Ib trial evaluates the best dose and side effects of MRX-2843 when given in combination with osimertinib in treating patients with EGFR gene mutant non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). MRX-2843 and osimertinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Osimertinib in Treating Patients with Stage IIIB-IV or Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with EGFR Exon 20 Insertion Mutations

    This phase II trial studies how well osimertinib works in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer with EGFR exon 20 insertion mutation that is stage IIIB-IV or has come back (recurrent). Osimertinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 290 locations

  • Implantable Microdevice for the Evaluation of Drug Response in Patients with Primary Brain Tumors

    This early phase I trial studies the feasibility and safety of an implantable microdevice for the evaluation of drug response in patients with primary brain tumors. Brain tumors are known to be very different from each other and respond differently to different drugs. It would be very helpful to find out what drugs have the best chance of working in each specific tumor. This research study involves drugs that are released by a small device, as small as the tip of a needle, that is inserted by a neurosurgeon into the tumor at the time of surgery and is then removed by the end of the surgery. The goal of this research study is to prove that these small devices can be used to find out which drugs have better effects on treating tumors.
    Location: 2 locations