Clinical Trials Using Oxaliplatin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Oxaliplatin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 98

  • Study of MK-4280 as Monotherapy and in Combination With Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) With or Without Chemotherapy AND MK-4280A as Monotherapy in Adults With Advanced Solid Tumors (MK-4280-001)

    This is a safety and pharmacokinetics study of MK-4280 as monotherapy and in combination with pembrolizumab (MK-3475) AND MK-4280A as monotherapy in adults with metastatic solid tumors for which there is no available therapy which may convey clinical benefit. Part A of this study is a dose escalation design in which participants receive MK-4280 as monotherapy or MK-4280 in combination with pembrolizumab. Part B is a dose confirmation design to estimate the recommended Phase 2 dose (RPTD), as determined by dose-limiting toxicity, for MK-4280 in combination with pembrolizumab in participants with advanced solid tumors. Part B will also assess the efficacy of MK-4280 as monotherapy and in combination with pembrolizumab with and without chemotherapy AND MK-4280A as monotherapy in expansion cohorts.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Laparoscopic HIPEC with Chemoradiation as First Line Treatment in Treating Patients with Local Regional Advanced Gastric Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) with chemoradiation works as first line treatment in treating patients with gastric cancer that has spread from its original site of growth to nearby tissues or lymph nodes. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin, paclitaxel, carboplatin, fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Heating a chemotherapy solution and infusing it directly into the abdomen may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving HIPEC with chemoradiation may work better in treating patients with gastric cancer.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • Hepatic Arterial Infusion Using Codman Catheter / Synchromed Pump for the Treatment of Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases or Unresectable Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) using the Codman catheter / Synchromed pump in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to the liver (metastases) and cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. HAI is a procedure in which chemotherapy drugs are directly delivered to the liver through a pump that is surgically implanted into the liver. This approach can produce higher local concentrations of the infused drug with few systemic side effects. The manufacturer of the main pump device used for HAI terminated production in April 2018. Thus, alternate means of employing HAI need to be devised in order to continue offering this therapy. This trial may help researchers learn about the safety of HAI using a similar pump, the Synchromed II, combined with a Codman vascular catheter.
    Location: University of Kentucky / Markey Cancer Center, Lexington, Kentucky

  • A Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Polatuzumab Vedotin in Combination With Rituximab, Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin Compared to Rituximab, Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin Alone in Participants With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This study is a multicenter, open-label study of polatuzumab vedotin administered by intravenous (IV) infusion in combination with rituximab, gemcitabine and oxaliplatin (R-GemOx) in participants with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The study comprises of two stages: a safety run-in stage and a randomized controlled trial.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Oxaliplatin and mFOLFIRI Regimen for the Treatment of Peritoneal Carcinomatosis from Colorectal or Appendiceal Cancer

    This phase I trial identifies the best dose, the side effects and effectiveness of giving oxaliplatin in combination with a standard chemotherapy regimen (modified fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan [mFOLFIRI]) for the treatment of colorectal or appendiceal cancer that has spread throughout the peritoneal cavity (peritoneal carcinomatosis). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving oxaliplatin in combination with fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan may work better than current standard therapies for the treatment of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis and may improve survival outcomes.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Fluorouracil, Oxaliplatin, Liposomal Irinotecan with or without Trastuzumab for the First Line Treatment of Advanced Esophageal or Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and liposomal irinotecan work alone or with trastuzumab in treating patients with esophageal or gastric adenocarcinoma that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and liposomal irinotecan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, liposomal irinotecan, and trastuzumab may work as a first line treatment for esophageal or gastric adenocarcinoma.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Use of Trifluridine / Tipiracil and Oxaliplatin as Induction Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Resectable Esophageal or Gastroesophageal Junction (GEJ) Adenocarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well trifluridine / tipiracil and oxaliplatin work as the first line of treatment (induction) in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as trifluridine / tipiracil and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Nivolumab and Oxaliplatin with or without Ipilimumab for the Treatment of Advanced Squamous or Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of nivolumab and oxaliplatin with or without ipilimumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with squamous or non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab and oxaliplatin with or without ipilimumab may kill more tumor cells in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • FLOT and Chemoradiation before Surgery for the Treatment of Resectable Esophageal or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well FLOT (fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel) and chemoradiation before surgery work in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, docetaxel, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. FLOT and chemoradiation before surgery may be an effective treatment for patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer.
    Location: University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado

  • Phase II Study of Short Course FOLFOX Chemotherapy With Either Nivolumab or Nivolumab + Radiation in the First Line Treatment of Metastatic or Unresectable Gastroesophageal Cancers (BMS Protocol CA209-76L)

    This is a randomized phase II study examining nivolumab alone versus radiation therapy with nivolumab in subjects who did not have disease progression to initial therapy with the combination of FOLFOX and Nivolumab.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Atezolizumab with or without PEGPH20 before and after Surgery for the Treatment of Stage I-II Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab with or without PEGPH20 given before and after surgery works in treating patients with stage I-II pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. PEGPH20 may stop the growth of tumor cells by breaking down hyaluronan, a tissue component needed for cell growth. Giving atezolizumab with PEGPH20 before and after surgery may increase immune response compared to atezolizumab alone.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • FOLFIRINOX Chemotherapy Before Surgery in Treating Patients with Non-Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well leucovorin, fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has not spread to other places of the body (non-metastatic), when given before surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin, fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy before surgery may make the cancer easier to remove with surgery and increase the chances of the cancer staying away after surgery.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Study of GS-1423 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors

    For Phase 1a, the primary objectives of this study are to assess safety and tolerability and to define the dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of GS-1423 monotherapy in participants with advanced solid tumors. For Phase 1b Cohort 1 safety run-in, the primary objective is to assess safety and tolerability and to define the DLT and MTD or RP2D of GS-1423 in combination with a chemotherapy regimen in participants with unresectable, recurrent or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. For Phase 1b Cohort 1 post safety run-in, the primary objective is to assess the preliminary efficacy of GS-1423 in combination with a chemotherapy regimen in participants with unresectable, recurrent or metastatic gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, as assessed by the confirmed objective response rate (ORR).
    Location: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Stage I-IIIB Rectal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well patients with stage I-IIIB rectal cancer respond to a short course of radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy. Radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin, fluorouracil, and capecitabine work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. A combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy may prevent patients from needing surgery, could delay their need for surgery, or may mean that they need less drastic surgery and could potentially avoid a permanent ostomy (a surgically created connection between the intestine and the abdominal wall that allows for elimination of stool).
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Proton Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Resectable Pancreatic Cancer, PROTON-PANC Study

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of short-course proton radiation therapy when given together with chemotherapy in treatment patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Radiation therapy uses high energy protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving proton therapy and chemotherapy may work better than chemotherapy alone in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia

  • Serial Measurements of Molecular and Architectural Responses to Therapy (SMMART) PRIME Trial

    This phase Ib trial determines if samples from a patient’s cancer can be tested to find combinations of drugs that provide clinical benefit for the kind of cancer the patient has. This study is also being done to understand why cancer drugs can stop working and how different cancers in different people respond to different types of therapy.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Gevokizumab With Standard of Care Anti-cancer Therapies for Metastatic Colorectal, Gastroesophageal, and Renal Cancers

    This study will determine the pharmacodynamically-active dose of gevokizumab and the tolerable dose and preliminary efficacy of gevokizumab in combination with the standard of care anti-cancer therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, metastatic gastroesophageal cancer and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Atezolizumab, Oxaliplatin, and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients with Esophageal or Gastroesophageal Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well atezolizumab in combination with oxaliplatin and fluorouracil works in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab, oxaliplatin, and fluorouracil may work better in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Nivolumab, Ipilimumab and Chemoradiation in Treating Patients with Resectable Gastric Cancer

    This pilot phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well nivolumab and ipilimumab in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy work in treating patients with gastric cancer that can be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy uses thin beams of radiation of different strengths aimed at the tumor from many angles. This type of radiation therapy may reduce the damage to healthy tissue near the tumor. Giving nivolumab, ipilimumab, chemotherapy and radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with gastric cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • CPI-613 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well CPI-613 and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced). CPI-613 inhibits energy production in cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, irinotecan hydrochloride, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CPI-613 and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) Plus Chemotherapy Versus Placebo Plus Chemotherapy in Participants Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction (GEJ) Adenocarcinoma (MK-3475-859 / KEYNOTE-859)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of pembrolizumab (MK-3745) in combination with chemotherapy (Cisplatin combined with 5-Fluorouracil [FP regimen] or oxaliplatin combined with capecitabine [CAPOX regimen]) versus placebo in combination with chemotherapy (FP or CAPOX regimens) in the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative advanced gastric or GEJ adenocarcinoma in adult participants. The primary hypotheses of this study are that pembrolizumab plus chemotherapy is superior to placebo plus chemotherapy in terms of overall survival (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS).
    Location: 2 locations

  • FOLFIRINOX Regimen or Gemcitabine-Nab-paclitaxel Followed by Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable or Borderline Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX regimen) or gemcitabine-nab-paclitaxel followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread from its original site to nearby tissues or lymph nodes and cannot be removed by surgery, or is difficult to remove by surgery due to the tumor surrounding major blood channels in the pancreas. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as the FOLFIRINOX regimen and gemcitabine-nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving the FOLFIRINOX regimen or gemcitabine-nab-paclitaxel followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: University of Alabama at Birmingham Cancer Center, Birmingham, Alabama

  • Fluorouracil, Leucovorin, Oxaliplatin and Pembrolizumab in Treating Participants with Resectable Gastroesophageal Junction and Stomach Adenocarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX) and pembrolizumab work in treating participants with gastroesophageal junction and stomach cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy such as, fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin in combination with pembrolizumab may work better in treating participants with gastroesophageal junction and stomach adenocarcinoma.
    Location: University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, Kansas

  • ABI-009 (Nab-rapamycin) in Combination With FOLFOX and Bevacizumab as First-line Therapy in Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    A phase 1 / 2 multi-center investigation of ABI-009 (nab-rapamycin) in combination with mFOLFOX6 and Bevacizumab as first-line therapy in patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Pembrolizumab, Oxaliplatin, Capecitabine as First Line Treatment for Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Esophagus or Stomach Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine work as first-line treatment in treating patients with esophagus or stomach cancer that has come back (recurrent) or spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine may work better in treating patients with esophagus or stomach cancer.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina