Clinical Trials Using Paclitaxel

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Paclitaxel. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 177
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  • Testing the Drug Atezolizumab or Placebo with Usual Therapy in First-Line HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab with or without atezolizumab works in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab with or without atezolizumab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 430 locations

  • Letrozole with or without Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Stage II-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase III trial studies how well letrozole with or without paclitaxel and carboplatin works in treating patients with stage II-IV low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary, fallopian tube, or peritoneum. Letrozole is an enzyme inhibitor that lowers the amount of estrogen made by the body which in turn may stop the growth of tumor cells that need estrogen to grow. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving letrozole alone or in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin works better in treating patients with low-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary, fallopian tube, or peritoneum compared to paclitaxel and carboplatin without letrozole.
    Location: 422 locations

  • Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel or FOLFIRI in Advanced Small Bowel Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well ramucirumab and paclitaxel or the FOLFIRI regimen (leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and irinotecan hydrochloride) work in treating patients with small bowel cancers that have spread extensively to other anatomic sites (advanced) or are no longer responding to treatment (refractory). Ramucirumab is a monoclonal antibody that attaches to and inhibits a molecule called VEGFR-2. This may restrain new blood vessel formation therefore reducing nutrient supply to tumor which may interfere with tumor cell growth and expansion. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and irinotecan hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving Ramucirumab plus paclitaxel or FOLFIRI, may be helpful in treating advanced or refractory small bowel cancers and may help patients live longer.
    Location: 288 locations

  • Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib or Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent Platinum-Resistant or -Refractory Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well cediranib maleate and olaparib work when given together or separately, and compares them to standard chemotherapy in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has returned (recurrent) after receiving chemotherapy with drugs that contain platinum (platinum-resistant) or continued to grow while being treated with platinum-based chemotherapy drugs (platinum-refractory). Cediranib maleate and olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving cediranib maleate and olaparib together may cause more damage to cancer cells when compared to either drug alone or standard chemotherapy.
    Location: 336 locations

  • Testing the Combination of Pevonedistat with Chemotherapy for Bile Duct Cancer of the Liver

    This phase II trial studies how well pevonedistat alone or in combination with chemotherapy (paclitaxel and carboplatin) works in treating patients with bile duct cancer of the liver. Pevonedistat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This study may help the study doctors find out how well pevonedistat shrinks bile duct cancer of the liver when given alone and when in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin.
    Location: 257 locations

  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel with or without Ramucirumab in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced, Recurrent, or Metastatic Thymic Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without ramucirumab work in treating patients with thymic cancer that has spread to other places in the body, has come back, or cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ramucirumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known if giving carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without ramucirumab will work better in treating patients with thymic cancer.
    Location: 236 locations

  • Testing the Addition of the Immunotherapy Drug Pembrolizumab to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Paclitaxel and Carboplatin) in Stage III-IV or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    This phase III trial studies how well the combination of pembrolizumab, paclitaxel and carboplatin, works compared with paclitaxel and carboplatin alone in treating patients with endometrial cancer that is stage III or IV, or has come back (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Paclitaxel and carboplatin are chemotherapy drugs used as part of the usual treatment approach for this type of cancer. This study aims to assess if adding immunotherapy to these drugs is better or worse than the usual approach for treatment of this cancer.
    Location: 162 locations

  • Individualized Treatment in Treating Patients with Stage II-IVB Nasopharyngeal Cancer Based on EBV DNA

    There are two study questions we are asking in this randomized phase II / III trial based on a blood biomarker, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for locoregionally advanced non-metastatic nasopharyngeal cancer. All patients will first undergo standard concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. When this standard treatment is completed, if there is no detectable EBV DNA in their plasma, then patients are randomized to either standard adjuvant cisplatin and fluorouracil chemotherapy or observation. If there is still detectable levels of plasma EBV DNA, patients will be randomized to standard cisplatin and fluorouracil chemotherapy versus gemcitabine and paclitaxel. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, fluorouracil, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and paclitaxel work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving cisplatin and fluorouracil is more effective than gemcitabine hydrochloride and paclitaxel after radiation therapy in treating patients with nasopharyngeal cancer.
    Location: 158 locations

  • Testing the Ability to Decrease Chemotherapy in Patients with HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Who Have No Remaining Cancer at Surgery after Limited Pre-operative Chemotherapy and HER2-Targeted Therapy

    This trial studies how well paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab work in eliminating further chemotherapy after surgery in patients with HER2-positive stage II-IIIa breast cancer who have no cancer remaining at surgery (either in the breast or underarm lymph nodes) after pre-operative chemotherapy and HER2-targeted therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Trastuzumab and pertuzumab are both a form of “targeted therapy” because they work by attaching themselves to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of tumor cells, known as HER2 receptors. When these drugs attach to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the tumor cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Giving paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may enable fewer chemotherapy drugs to be given without compromising patient outcomes compared to the usual treatment.
    Location: 143 locations

  • Chemotherapy and Pelvic Radiation Therapy with or without Additional Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with High-Risk Early-Stage Cervical Cancer after Radical Hysterectomy

    This randomized phase III trial is studying chemotherapy and pelvic radiation therapy to see how well they work when given with or without additional chemotherapy in treating patients with high-risk early-stage cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether chemotherapy and radiation therapy are more effective when given with or without additional chemotherapy in treating cervical cancer.
    Location: 148 locations

  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
    Location: 60 locations

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin or Bleomycin Sulfate, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients with Advanced or Recurrent Sex Cord-Ovarian Stromal Tumors

    This randomized phase II trial studies paclitaxel and carboplatin to see how well they work compared with bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin in treating patients with sex cord-ovarian stromal tumors that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced) or has returned (recurrent). Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. It is not yet known which chemotherapy regimen is more effective in treating sex cord-ovarian stromal tumors.
    Location: 192 locations

  • Comparing Photon Therapy to Proton Therapy to Treat Patients with Lung Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies proton chemoradiotherapy to see how well it works compared to photon chemoradiotherapy in treating patients with stage II-IIIB non-small cell lung cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor, such as photon or proton beam radiation therapy, may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether proton chemoradiotherapy is more effective than photon chemoradiotherapy in treating non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 50 locations

  • Comparing Proton Therapy to Photon Radiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    This trial studies how well proton beam radiation therapy compared with intensity modulated photo radiotherapy works in treating patients with stage I-IVA esophageal cancer. Proton beam radiation therapy uses a beam of protons (rather than x-rays) to send radiation inside the body to the tumor without damaging much of the healthy tissue around it. Intensity modulated photon radiotherapy uses high-energy x-rays to deliver radiation directly to the tumor without damaging much of the healthy tissue around it. It is not yet known whether proton beam therapy or intensity modulated photo radiotherapy will work better in treating patients with esophageal cancer.
    Location: 39 locations

  • Neratinib HER Mutation Basket Study (SUMMIT)

    This is an open-label, non-randomized, multicenter, multinational, Phase 2 study exploring the efficacy and safety of neratinib as monotherapy or in combination with other therapies in patients with ERBB mutation-positive or EGFR gene-amplified solid tumors.
    Location: 24 locations

  • A Study of VB-111 With Paclitaxel vs Paclitaxel for Treatment of Recurrent Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer (OVAL)

    The purpose of this phase 3, randomized, multicenter study is to compare VB-111 and paclitaxel to placebo and paclitaxel in adult patients with Recurrent Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer.
    Location: 25 locations

  • I-SPY 2 TRIAL: Neoadjuvant and Personalized Adaptive Novel Agents to Treat Breast Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to further advance the ability to practice personalized medicine by learning which new drug agents are most effective with which types of breast cancer tumors and by learning more about which early indicators of response (tumor analysis prior to surgery via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images along with tissue and blood samples) are predictors of treatment success.
    Location: 17 locations

  • A Phase 1b / 2 Study of Rebastinib (DCC-2036) in Combination With Paclitaxel in Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This is an open-label Phase 1b / 2 multicenter study of rebastinib (DCC-2036) in combination with paclitaxel designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors.
    Location: 11 locations

  • A Study to Evaluate Ibrutinib Combination Therapy in Patients With Selected Gastrointestinal and Genitourinary Tumors

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of single agent ibrutinib or the combination treatments of ibrutinib with everolimus, paclitaxel, docetaxel, pembrolizumab or cetuximab in selected advanced gastrointestinal and genitourinary tumors.
    Location: 10 locations

  • A Study of Dostarlimab (TSR-042) Plus Carboplatin-paclitaxel Versus Placebo Plus Carboplatin-paclitaxel in Patients With Recurrent or Primary Advanced Endometrial Cancer

    This is a Phase 3, randomized, double-blind, multicenter study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of dostarlimab plus carboplatin-paclitaxel versus placebo plus carboplatin-paclitaxel in patients with recurrent or primary advanced (Stage III or IV) endometrial cancer.
    Location: 12 locations

  • Trastuzumab Deruxtecan (DS-8201a) Versus Investigator's Choice for HER2-low Breast Cancer That Has Spread or Cannot be Surgically Removed [DESTINY-Breast04]

    This study will compare DS-8201a to physician choice standard treatment. Participants must have HER2-low breast cancer that has been treated before. Participants' cancer: - Cannot be removed by an operation - Has spread to other parts of the body
    Location: 12 locations

  • Oral Paclitaxel Efficacy Safety and PK in Recurrent and Metastatic Breast Cancer

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of DHP107 (Oral Paclitaxel, Korea brand name: Liporaxel®) compared to IV Paclitaxel in patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Breast Cancer.
    Location: 9 locations

  • A Study of Ipatasertib in Combination With Paclitaxel as a Treatment for Participants With PIK3CA / AKT1 / PTEN-Altered, Locally Advanced or Metastatic, Triple-Negative Breast Cancer or Hormone Receptor-Positive, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    This study will evaluate the efficacy of ipatasertib + paclitaxel versus placebo + paclitaxel in participants with histologically confirmed, locally advanced or metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and in participants with locally advanced or metastatic hormone receptor positive (HR+) / human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative (HER2−) breast adenocarcinoma who are not suitable for endocrine therapy.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Ruxolitinib Phosphate and Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well ruxolitinib phosphate and chemotherapy before surgery work in treating patients with triple negative inflammatory breast cancer. Ruxolitinib phosphate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ruxolitinib phosphate, paclitaxel, and chemotherapy before surgery may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 8 locations

  • ILND Surgery Alone or after Chemotherapy with or without Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Penile Cancer

    This phase III randomized trial studies how well inguinal lymph node dissection (ILND) surgery alone or after chemotherapy with or without intensity-modulated radiation therapy works in treating patients with penile cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Surgery is used to remove the lymph nodes and may be able to cure the cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not known whether having surgery after chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy is better than having surgery alone.
    Location: 12 locations


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