Clinical Trials Using Palbociclib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Palbociclib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-57 of 57

  • Binimetinib and Palbociclib or TAS-102 in Treating Patients with KRAS and NRAS Mutant Metastatic or Unresectable Colorectal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well binimetinib and palbociclib work compared to TAS-102 in treating patients with KRAS and NRAS mutation positive colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Binimetinib and palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as TAS-102, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving binimetinib and palbociclib may work better compared to TAS-102 alone in treating patients with colorectal cancer.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Olaparib, Palbociclib, and Fulvestrant in Treating Patients with BRCA Mutation-Associated, Hormone Receptor-Positive, and HER2-Negative Advanced Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of palbociclib when given together with olaparib and fulvestrant, and to see how well they work in treating patients with BRCA mutation-associated, hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer that has spread from its original site of growth to nearby tissues or lymph nodes and cannot be removed by surgery, or has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Palbociclib and olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Anti-hormone therapy consisting of fulvestrant may prevent breast cancer cell growth by blocking estrogen and progesterone receptor stimulation. This trial studies the effectiveness of the combination of palbociclib, olaparib and fulvestrant.
    Location: 2 locations

  • CPX-351 and Palbociclib in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of palbociclib when given together with CPX-351 and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as CPX-351, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Palbociclib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. The purpose of this study is to test the safety and efficacy of the combination of palbociclib plus CPX-351 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Palbociclib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Pediatric Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies how well palbociclib and combination chemotherapy work in treating pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Palbociclib and dasatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, bortezomib, and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving palbociclib and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Copanlisib, Letrozole, and Palbociclib in Treating Patients with Hormone Receptor Positive HER2 Negative Stage I-IV Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies side effects and best dose of copanlisib when given together with letrozole and palbociclib and to see how well they work in treating hormone receptor positive HER2 negative stage I-IV breast cancer. Copanlisib and palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs, such as letrozole, may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body. Giving copanlisib, letrozole, and palbociclib may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Tucatinib, Letrozole, and Palbociclib in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Hormone Receptor and HER2 Positive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects of tucatinib, letrozole, and palbociclib and how well they work in treating patients with in hormone receptor and HER2 positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Tucatinib, letrozole, and palbociclib, may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Pediatric Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, or Histiocytic Disorders (The Pediatric MATCH Screening Trial)

    This Pediatric MATCH screening and multi-sub-study phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in pediatric patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, or histiocytic disorders that have progressed following at least one line of standard systemic therapy and / or for which no standard treatment exists that has been shown to prolong survival. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic changes or abnormalities (mutations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic mutation, and may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors or non-Hodgkin lymphomas.
    Location: 146 locations