Clinical Trials Using Palifermin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Palifermin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-4 of 4
  • Melphalan Hydrochloride in Treating Participants with Newly-Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan hydrochloride in treating participants with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma who are undergoing a donor stem cell transplantation. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplantation helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the participant, they may help the participant's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving melphalan hydrochloride before a donor stem cell transplantation may work better than standard chemotherapy in helping to prevent multiple myeloma from coming back.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Study of Palifermin (Kepivance) in Persons Undergoing Unrelated Donor Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Background: - In allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), stem cells are taken from a donor and given to a recipient. Sometimes the recipient s immune system destroys the donor s cells. Or donor immune cells attack the recipient s tissues, called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This is less likely when the recipient and donor have similar human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Researchers want to see if the drug palifermin improves the results of allogeneic SCT from HLA-matched unrelated donors. Objective: - To see if high doses of palifermin before chemotherapy are safe, prevent chronic GVHD, and improve immune function after transplant. Eligibility: - Adults 18 70 with blood or bone marrow cancer with no HLA-matched sibling, but with a possible HLA-matched donor. Design: - Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and blood and urine tests. They will have scans and heart and lung exams. - Before transplant, participants will: - Have many tests and exams. These include blood tests throughout the study and bone marrow biopsy. - Get a central line catheter if they do not have one. - Have 1 3 rounds of chemotherapy. - Take more tests to make sure they can have the transplant, including medical history, physical exam, and CT scan. - Get palifermin by IV and more chemotherapy. They will get other drugs, some they will take for 6 months. - Participants will get the SCT. - After transplant, participants will: - Be hospitalized at least 3 4 weeks. - Have tests for GVHD at 60 days and 6 months. These include mouth and skin photos and biopsies. - Stay near D.C. for 3 months. - Visit NIH 5 times the first 2 years, then yearly. They may have scans and biopsies.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Palifermin with Leuprolide Acetate or Degarelix after Total-Body Irradiation Based Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well palifermin with leuprolide acetate or degarelix works after total body-irradiation based donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving palifermin and leuprolide acetate or degarelix and removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known whether giving palifermin with leuprolide acetate or degarelix is more effective in helping the immune system recover faster after a donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Human Lysozyme Goat Milk for the Prevention of Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of human lysozyme goat milk in preventing graft versus host disease in patients with blood cancer undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can cause an immune response against the body's own normal cells (call graft versus host disease). The goat milk in the study is from goats that have been genetically engineered to produce human lysozyme in the milk. Human lysozyme is a natural enzyme found in human milk and acts as an antimicrobial. Lysozyme is key to the digestive health of breast-fed human infants, since it helps the growth of beneficial gut bacteria and reduces the growth of bacteria that causes diarrhea and intestinal disease. Giving human lysozyme goat milk may reduce the rate of graft versus host disease in blood cancer patients undergoing a donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California