Clinical Trials Using Panitumumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Panitumumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-15 of 15
  • Cabozantinib-S-Malate and Panitumumab in Treating Patients with Colorectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the safety and best dose of cabozantinib-s-malate when given together with panitumumab in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Cabozantinib-s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread Giving cabozantinib-s-malate with panitumumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Panitumumab, Regorafenib, or TAS-102, in Treating Patients with Metastatic and / or Unresectable RAS Wild-Type Colorectal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well retreatment with panitumumab works compared to standard of care regorafenib or trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (TAS-102) in treating patients with colorectal cancer that is negative for RAS wild-type colorectal cancer has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), and / or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), and is negative for resistance mutations in blood. Treatment with panitumumab may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Some tumors need growth factors to keep growing. Growth factor antagonists, such as regorafenib, may interfere with the growth factor and stop the tumor from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as TAS-102, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panitumumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer than with the usual treatment of regorafenib or TAS-102.
    Location: 15 locations

  • Regorafenib, with Cetuximab or Panitumumab, for the Treatment of Unresectable, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This phase II trial investigates how well regorafenib and anti-EGFR therapy (cetuximab or panitumumab) works for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced), or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Regorafenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab or panitumumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this research study is to compare the effects, good and / or bad, of taking regorafenib follow by cetuximab or panitumumab, to those that receive cetuximab or panitumumab before regorafenib.
    Location: 15 locations

  • Panitumumab, Nivolumab, and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF Wild-Type MSS Refractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well panitumumab, nivolumab, and ipilimumab work in treating patients with KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF wild-type microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer that does not respond to treatment (refractory), has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), and cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, nivolumab, and ipilimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 4 locations

  • A Safety Study of NUC-3373 in Combination With Standard Agents Used in Colorectal Cancer Treatment

    This is a two-part study of NUC-3373 administered every 2 weeks as an intravenous infusion, in separate combinations with leucovorin, oxaliplatin, oxaliplatin + bevacizumab, oxaliplatin + panitumumab, irinotecan, and irinotecan + cetuximab. The primary objective is to identify a recommended dose for NUC-3373 when combined with these agents.
    Location: 4 locations

  • FOLFOXIRI Plus Panitumumab in Metastatic RAS Wild-type, Left-sided Colorectal Cancer

    This is a phase II, open-label, non-randomized study in subjects with histologically confirmed diagnosis of left-sided RAS WT advanced adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum who have not received prior systemic therapy for metastatic disease.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel with or without Panitumumab in Treating Patients with Invasive Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without panitumumab work in treating patients with invasive triple negative breast cancer. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping the them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without panitumumab before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Talimogene Laherparepvec and Panitumumab for the Treatment of Locally Advanced or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well talimogene laherparepvec and panitumumab work in treating patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the skin that has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or other places in the body (metastatic). Talimogene laherparepvec is a type of vaccine made from a gene-modified virus that may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Panitumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving talimogene laherparepvec and panitumumab may work better in treating patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the skin compared to panitumumab alone.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Niraparib and Panitumumab in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well niraparib and panitumumab work in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Niraparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving niraparib and panitumumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Glutaminase Inhibitor CB-839, Panitumumab, and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Metastatic and Refractory RAS Wildtype Colorectal Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of glutaminase inhibitor CB-839 and how well it works with panitumumab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with RAS wildtype colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body and does not respond to treatment. Glutaminase inhibitor CB-839 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving glutaminase inhibitor CB-839 with panitumumab and irinotecan hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.
    Location: Vanderbilt University / Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee

  • Panitumumab with or without Trametinib in Treating Patients with Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well panitumumab with or without trametinib works in treating patients with stage IV colorectal cancer. Panitumumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving panitumumab with or without trametinib may work better in treating patients with stage IV colorectal cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Women’s MoonShot: Neoadjuvant Treatment with PaCT for Patients with Locally Advanced TNBC

    This phase II trial studies how well panitumumab, carboplatin and paclitaxel work in treating patients with newly diagnosed triple negative breast cancer that is limited to the breast and possibly to the nearby lymph nodes. This treatment study is linked to NCI-2015-00191 protocol, which uses a baseline biopsy to determine the neoadjuvant therapy that matches the sub-type of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Immunotherapy with panitumumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panitumumab, carboplatin and paclitaxel before surgery may be an effective treatment for breast cancer by making the tumor smaller and reducing the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Panitumumab-IRDye800 in Diagnosing Participants with Malignant Glioma Undergoing Surgery

    The phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of panitumumab-IRDye800 in diagnosing participants with malignant glioma who undergo surgery. Panitumumab-IRDye800 can attach to tumor cells and make them more visible using a special camera during surgery, which may help surgeons better distinguish tumor cells from normal brain tissue and identify small tumors that cannot be seen using current imaging methods.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Panitumumab-IRDye800 in Finding Cancer in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of panitumumab-IRDye800 and to see how well it works in finding cancer in patients with pancreatic cancer who are undergoing surgery. Panitumumab-IRDye800 is a combination of the antibody drug panitumumab and IRDye800CW, an investigational dye that can be seen using a special camera. Panitumumab-IRDye800 may attach to tumor cells and make them more visible during surgery in patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Panitumumab-IRDye800 in Detecting Cancer in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of panitumumab-IRDye800 in detecting cancer in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing surgery. Panitumumab-IRDye800 is a drug that attaches to cancer cells and makes them visible to doctors through a special camera that can be used during surgery. Panitumumab works by attaching to the cancer cell in a unique way that allows the drug to get into the cancer tissue. IRDye800 is a dye that helps human tissue show up better when using the special camera. Panitumumab carries the dye into the cancer tissue, which allows doctors to see where the cancer is using a camera. Panitumumab-IRDye800 may allow doctors to see tumors more accurately and remove them successfully during surgery.
    Location: 2 locations