Clinical Trials Using Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-19 of 19
  • Cediranib Maleate and Olaparib or Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent Platinum-Resistant or -Refractory Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well cediranib maleate and olaparib work when given together or separately, and compares them to standard chemotherapy in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has returned (recurrent) after receiving chemotherapy with drugs that contain platinum (platinum-resistant) or continued to grow while being treated with platinum-based chemotherapy drugs (platinum-refractory). Cediranib maleate and olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving cediranib maleate and olaparib together may cause more damage to cancer cells when compared to either drug alone or standard chemotherapy.
    Location: 321 locations

  • Second-Line Pembrolizumab in Combination with Gemcitabine, Vinorelbine, and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well pembrolizumab in combination with gemcitabine, vinorelbine, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride work in treating patients with Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, vinorelbine, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab, gemcitabine, vinorelbine, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride may work better at treating Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Efficacy and Safety Study of AVB-S6-500 in Patients With Platinum-Resistant Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    This is a Phase 1b / 2 study of AVB-S6-500 in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) or paclitaxel (Pac) in patients with platinum resistant recurrent ovarian cancer. The phase 1b portion of the study is open label and patients will receive either AVB-S6-500+PLD or AVB-S6-500+ Pac. The Phase 2 portion of the study is randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to compare efficacy and tolerability of AVB-S6-500 in combination with PLD or Pac versus placebo plus PLD or Pac.
    Location: 6 locations

  • MV-NIS or Investigator's Choice Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Ovarian, Fallopian, or Peritoneal Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well oncolytic measles virus encoding thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (MV-NIS) compared to investigator's choice chemotherapy works in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian, or peritoneal cancer. Measles virus, which has been changed in a certain way, may be able to kill tumor cells without damaging normal cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Avatar-Directed Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well Avatar-directed chemotherapy works in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer that does not respond to platinum anti-cancer drugs. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, gemcitabine hydrochloride, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, topotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Using an Avatar, a living tumor sample with similar genetic characteristics to the original tumor, may help determine which chemotherapy is most effective.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Surgery and Chemotherapy with or without Chemotherapy after Surgery in Treating Patients with Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Uterine, or Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well surgery and heated chemotherapy with or without non-heated chemotherapy after surgery works in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, uterine, or peritoneal cancer. Giving a dose of heated chemotherapy into the abdomen during surgery that is done to remove ovarian, fallopian tube, uterine, or peritoneal cancer may help lower the risk of the cancer coming back. Giving unheated chemotherapy drugs directly into the abdomen after surgery may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • History of the KSHV Inflammatory Cytokine Syndrome (KICS)

    Background: - KSHV inflammatory cytokine syndrome (KICS) is a newly recognized disease caused by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). This virus can cause cancer. People with KICS can have severe symptoms. They include fever, weight loss, and fluid in the legs or abdomen. People with KICS may also be at risk of getting other cancers associated with KSHV. These cancers include Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoma. Because KICS is a newly identified disease, more information is needed on how the disease works and what can be done to treat it. Objectives: - To collect genetic and medical information from people with KSHV inflammatory cytokine syndrome. Eligibility: - Individuals at least 18 years of age who have Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus and symptoms that resemble those caused by KICS. Design: - Participants will have regular study visits. The schedule will be determined by the study researchers. - Participants will provide a complete medical history and have a full physical exam. Blood and urine samples will be collected as well. - People with KICS that requires treatment may get new experimental treatments. These treatments may include antiviral drugs and chemotherapy drugs, depending on the nature of the disease. - Participants will have imaging studies, such as chest x-rays and computed tomography scans, to study the tumors. - Bone marrow and lymph node biopsies may be done to collect tissue samples for study. - Participants who have Kaposi sarcoma will have photographs taken of their lesions.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Virotherapy and Natural History Study of KHSV-Associated Multricentric Castleman s Disease With Correlates of Disease Activity

    This study will gain information about a rare disorder called KSHV-associated multicentric Castleman s disease (MCD). KSHV, a virus, causes several kinds of cancer, including some forms of MCD. KSHV stands for the Kaposi s sarcoma herpes virus, also called human herpes virus-8, or HHV-8. Researchers want to understand the biology of KSHV-MCD to identify how this disease causes illness and to find ways to treat it. There is no standard therapy effective for all cases of KSHV-MCD. The disease is often fatal, and about half the people who have it die within 2 years of diagnosis. Patients ages 12 and older may be eligible for this study. Participation entails more drawing of blood and having repeated tumor biopsies than if patients received treatment in a non-research setting. Researchers would like to learn more about the relationship of KSHV and Castleman s disease symptoms, and they want to obtain at least three biopsies in this study. There are some side effects of experimental therapy that patients may take for KSHV-MCD. Zidovudine, or Retrovir , is used at a high dose. It is given orally or through a vein, four times daily, for 7 days or longer. Zidovudine can cause nausea, vomiting, decreased bone marrow function, and decreased blood counts. Combined with valganciclovir, or Valcyte , it is likely to be more toxic to bone marrow. Valganciclovir can cause problems with bone marrow function, leading to low blood counts, sterility, and defects in a fetus. Combined with zidovudine, valganciclovir may cause more toxicity to the bone marrow. It is given twice daily for 7 days or longer. Bortezomib, or Velcade , is given for a few seconds by a rapid push through a needle into the vein. It is given twice weekly for four doses and then stopped for 1 week. Bortezomib can sometimes cause low blood pressure; it also can cause gastrointestinal problems and a low blood platelet count. Rituximab and liposomal doxorubicin are drugs given by a catheter into a vein. Interferon-alpha is given by injection into the skin. Those drugs are not experimental, but their use in Castleman s disease is experimental. Some patients may be treated with a combination of chemotherapy followed by interferon-alpha. Interferon-alpha is infected into the skin by a needle. The natural form of interferon is produced by the body and helps to control viral infections. KSHV decreases the effect of the body s interferon, and the researchers want to see if giving higher doses of interferon will help to control KSHV infection. A positron emission tomography (PET) scan, for research purposes only, may be done up to three times a year. A radioactive sugar molecule called fluorodeoxyglucose, or FDG, is used. It is believed that activated lymphocytes that may be found in patients disease might use more FDG because these cells burn more glucose fuel. Children younger than 18 years will not have PET scan done. This study may or may not have a direct benefit for participants. However, detailed assessments made throughout the study may provide information to help the doctors treat KSHV-MCD better.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Temozolomide, Etoposide, Doxil, Dexamethasone, Ibrutinib, and Rituximab (TEDDI-R) in Aggressive B-cell Lymphomas With Secondary Involvement of the Central Nervous System (CNS)

    Background: Secondary central nervous system lymphoma (sCNSL) is cancer that has spread to the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat it do not cross the blood-brain barrier. This makes it hard to treat. Researchers hope that a new combination of drugs may be able to help. Objective: To find a better way to treat sCNSL. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with sCNSL Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Eye exam - Tissue or tumor biopsy - Collection of cerebrospinal fluid - CT, PET, and MRI scans: Participants will like in a machine that takes pictures of the body. - Bone marrow aspirations or biopsies: A needle will be inserted into the participant s hipbone. The needle will remove a small amount of marrow. Participants will take the study drugs in 21-day cycles. They will take some drugs by mouth. They will take others through a catheter: A small tube will be inserted into a vein in the arm, neck, or chest. They may have drugs given through a catheter placed through the brain or injected into the spinal canal. Participants will have regular visits during the study. These will include repeats of the screening test. They may also provide a saliva sample or have a cheek swab. Participants will have up to 4 treatment cycles. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after their last treatment dose. Then they will have visits every 3-6 months for 3 years and then yearly. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Durvalumab in Combination with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors, (DURVA+ study)

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab when given together with chemotherapy in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to others places in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine, liposomal doxorubicin, capecitabine, carboplatin, paclitaxel, and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with durvalumab may improve how immune cells respond and attack tumor cells.
    Location: National Cancer Institute Developmental Therapeutics Clinic, Bethesda, Maryland

  • A Study to Evaluate Safety / Tolerability of Immunotherapy Combinations in Participants With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer and Gynecologic Malignancies

    This is a Phase 1 / 1b, open-label, dose-escalation, and dose-expansion study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and clinical activity of AB928 in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) with or without IPI-549, or AB928 in combination with nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel (NP) in participants with advanced metastatic triple-negative breast cancer or ovarian cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pomalidomide in Combination With Liposomal Doxorubicin in People With Advanced or Refractory Kaposi Sarcoma

    Background: Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a cancer most often seen in people with HIV. It causes lesions. These are usually on the skin but sometimes in the lymph nodes, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract. Researchers think a combination of drugs may help treat KS. Objective: To test a combination of the anti-cancer drugs pomalidomide (CC-4047) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) in people with KS. Eligibility: People ages 18 and over with KS Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Questionnaires Physical exam Blood, urine, and heart tests Chest X-ray Biopsy: A small sample of tissue is taken from a KS lesion. Possible CT scan Possible exam of lungs or gastrointestinal tract with an endoscope: A flexible instrument examines inside the organ. Participants will take the drugs in 4-week cycles. They will take Doxil through an IV on Day 1 of each cycle. They will take CC-4047 tablets by mouth each day for the first 3 weeks of each cycle. Participants will have many visits: Before starting treatment To start each cycle Day 15 of first 2 cycles Visits include repeats of screening tests and: Multiple blood draws Photographs of lesions Participants will keep a drug diary. Participants will take aspirin or other drugs to prevent blood clots. Participants with HIV will have combination antiretroviral therapy. Some participants will have a PET scan. Participants will continue treatment as long as they tolerate it and their KS improves. After treatment, they will have several follow-up visits for up to 5 years ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Liposomal Doxorubicin, Bevacizumab, and Everolimus in Patients with Locally Advanced TNBC with Tumors Predicted Insensitive to Standard Chemotherapy; A Moonshot Initiative

    This phase II trial studies how well pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, bevacizumab, and everolimus work in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer with tumors predicted insensitive to standard chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells by stopping them from dividing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pegylated liposomal doxorubicin together with bevacizumab and everolimus may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride and carboplatin followed by surgery and paclitaxel work in treating patients with stage II-III breast cancer that does not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) / neu protein (triple negative). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, carboplatin, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride and carboplatin before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride and carboplatin followed by surgery and paclitaxel may be an effective treatment for breast cancer.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Ibrutinib, Temozolomide, Etoposide, Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Dexamethasone, and Rituximab in Treating Patients with Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ibrutinib when given together with temozolomide, etoposide, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, dexamethasone, and rituximab in treating patients with central nervous system lymphoma. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, etoposide, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving ibrutinib with rituximab and combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • RRx-001 in Lung Cancer, Ovarian Cancer and Neuroendocrine Tumors Prior to Re-administration of Platinum Based Doublet Regimens (QUADRUPLE THREAT)

    This study is designed to explore the potential of the epigenetic agent RRx-001 to sensitize patients who previously received and now have failed a platinum based doublet regimen. RRx-001 is administered with autologous blood once weekly followed by or in combination with reintroduction of platinum-based doublet therapy.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab with the NovoTTF-100L System in Treating Participants with Advanced, Recurrent, or Refractory Hepatic Metastatic Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of combination chemotherapy and bevacizumab, and to see how well they work with the NovoTTF-100L system in treating participants with cancer that has come back or does not respond to treatment and has spread to the liver. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin, fluorouracil, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, and temsirolimus, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The NovoTTF-100L system is a portable device that uses electrical fields to stop the growth of tumor cells. Giving combination chemotherapy and monoclonal antibody therapy while using the NovoTTF-100L system may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride with Atezolizumab and / or Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride with atezolizumab and / or bevacizumab work in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab and bevacizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known which combination will work better in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.
    Location: 762 locations

  • Study for Women With Platinum Resistant Ovarian Cancer Evaluating EC145 in Combination With Doxil® (PROCEED)

    The purpose of this study is to compare progression-free survival (PFS) (based upon investigator assessment using RECIST v1.1) in participants with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer who receive combination therapy with EC145 and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (EC145+PLD) with that in participants who receive PLD and placebo.
    Location: Virginia Commonwealth University / Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia