Clinical Trials Using Pentostatin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Pentostatin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-6 of 6
  • A Study of Ruxolitinib vs Best Available Therapy (BAT) in Patients With Steroid-refractory Chronic Graft vs. Host Disease (GvHD) After Bone Marrow Transplantation (REACH3)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of ruxolitinib against best available therapy in participants with steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease (SR cGvHD).
    Location: 9 locations

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma

    Background: Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer. Blood cell transplant can cure some people with lymphoma. Researchers want to see if they can limit the complications transplant can cause. Objective: To test if a stem cell transplant can cure or control lymphoma. Also to test if new ways of getting a recipient ready for a transplant may result in fewer problems and side effects. Eligibility: Recipients: People ages 12 and older with peripheral T cell lymphoma that does not respond to standard treatments Donors: Healthy people ages 18 and older whose relative has lymphoma Design: Participants will be screened with: Physical exam Blood and urine tests Bone marrow biopsy: A needle inserted into the participant s hip bone will remove marrow. Donors will also be screened with: X-rays Recipients will also be screened with: Lying in scanners that take pictures of the body Tumor sample Donors may donate blood. They will take daily shots for 5 7 days. They will have apheresis: A machine will take blood from one arm and take out their stem cells. The blood will be returned into the other arm. Recipients will be hospitalized at least 2 weeks before transplant. They will get a catheter: A plastic tube will be inserted into a vein in the neck or upper chest. They will get antibody therapy or chemotherapy. Recipients will get the transplant through their catheter. Recipients will stay in the hospital several weeks after transplant. They will get blood transfusions. They will take drugs including chemotherapy for about 2 months. Recipients will have visits 6, 12, 18, 24 months after transplant, then once a year for 5 years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Genomic Based Assignment of Therapy in Advanced Urothelial Carcinoma

    Background: Advanced urothelial cancer has no cure. But only a few chemotherapy drugs have been tested for it. The Co-eXpression ExtrapolatioN (COXEN) model predicts if cells respond to treatment. It may also help determine which drugs fight urothelial cancer based on the characteristics of a tumor. Researchers want to test if this model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks and how tumors respond to the next best therapy. Objective: To test if the COXEN model can choose the best therapy for advanced urothelial cancer within 3 weeks. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older whose urothelial cancer has spread after at least 1 line of chemotherapy Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, blood and urine tests, and tumor scans. Participants will provide a tumor sample from a previous surgery and a new biopsy. A needle will remove a small piece of tumor. Participants will repeat screening tests, plus have an EKG and scan. For the scan, they will get an injection of radioactive drug. They will lie in a machine that takes pictures. Participants will take the drugs assigned by the COXEN model. They will have visits every 2 3 weeks. These will include blood and urine tests. Participants will have tumor scans every 8 9 weeks. Participants may have another biopsy. Participants will take the drugs until they can t tolerate the side effects or their cancer worsens. They may be assigned to a second COXEN therapy. Participants will have a follow-up visit 4 5 weeks after their last drug dose. Participants will be contacted by phone every few months until death. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Pilot Trial of Allogeneic Blood or Marrow Transplantation for Primary Immunodeficiencies

    Background: Allogeneic blood or marrow transplant is when stem cells are taken from one person s blood or bone marrow and given to another person. Researchers think this may help people with immune system problems. Objective: To see if allogeneic blood or bone marrow transplant is safe and effective in treating people with primary immunodeficiencies. Eligibility: Donors: Healthy people ages 4 or older Recipients: People ages 4-75 with a primary immunodeficiency that may be treated with allogeneic blood or marrow transplant Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and blood tests. Participants will have urine tests, EKG, and chest x-ray. Donors will have: Bone marrow harvest: With anesthesia, marrow is taken by a needle in the hipbone. OR Blood collection: They will have several drug injections over 5-7 days. Blood is taken by IV in one arm, circulates through a machine to remove stem cells, and returned by IV in the other arm. Possible vein assessment or pre-anesthesia evaluation Recipients will have: Lung test, heart tests, radiology scans, CT scans, and dental exam Possible tissue biopsies or lumbar puncture Bone marrow and a small piece of bone removed by needle in the hipbone. Chemotherapy 1-2 weeks before transplant day Donor stem cell donation through a catheter put into a vein in the chest or neck Several-week hospital stay. They will take medications and may need blood transfusions and additional procedures. After discharge, recipients will: Remain near the clinic for about 3 months. They will have weekly visits and may require hospital readmission. Have multiple follow-up visits to the clinic in the first 6 months, and less frequently for at least 5 years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Randomized Phase II Trial of Rituximab With Either Pentostatin or Bendamustine for Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Background: - Researchers are attempting to develop new treatments for hairy cell leukemia (HCL) that has not responded well to or has recurred after standard HCL therapies. One nonstandard treatment for HCL is rituximab, an antibody that binds to the cancer cells and helps the immune system destroy them. By combining rituximab with other anti-cancer drugs, researchers hope to determine whether the combined drugs are successful in treating HCL. - Pentostatin and bendamustine are two anti-cancer drugs that have been used to treat different kinds of blood and immune system cancers. Bendamustine is approved to treat other kinds of leukemia and lymphoma, but it has not been used to treat HCL. Pentostatin has been used for more than 20 years to treat HCL, but it has not been combined with rituximab in official clinical trials. Objectives: - To determine whether rituximab with either pentostatin or bendamustine is a more effective treatment for HCL than rituximab alone. - To determine whether pentostatin or bendamustine is a more effective treatment for HCL when combined with rituximab. Eligibility: - Individuals at least 18 years of age who have been diagnosed with hairy cell leukemia that has not responded well to or has relapsed after standard HCL therapies. Design: - The study will last for four treatment cycles of 28 days each. - Prior to the study, participants will be screened with a full medical history and physical exam, bone marrow biopsy (if one has not been performed in the last 6 months), computed tomography (CT) or ultrasound scan, tumor measurements, and other tests as required by the researchers. Participants will provide blood and urine samples at this time as well. - Rituximab with bendamustine: Participants will receive rituximab on Days 1 and 15 of each cycle and bendamustine on Days 1 and 2 of each cycle, for a total of four cycles. - Rituximab with pentostatin: Participants will receive rituximab on Days 1 and 15 of each cycle and pentostatin on rituximab on Days 1 and 15 of each cycle, for a total of four cycles. - Participants will have regular tests during the treatment cycles, including bone marrow biopsies and CT or ultrasound scans. Participants will also provide regular blood and urine samples to assess the results of treatment....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Study of Cordycepin Plus Pentostatin in Patients With Refractory TdT-Positive Leukemia

    This is a two-part, open-label, Phase I / II study in subjects with relapsed or refractory TdT-positive leukemia for which no standard therapies are expected to result in durable remission.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov