Clinical Trials Using Pneumococcal Polyvalent Vaccine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Pneumococcal Polyvalent Vaccine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

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  • Vaccine Response With NT-I7

    Background: People with cancer, and especially older people, have a weakened immune system (the defense system of the body). This is often caused by the treatments for cancer. Older cancer survivors are therefore more prone to getting infections, some of which are preventable through vaccines. But because their immune systems are weakened, their response to vaccines is poor. Researchers want to see if a new drug, NT-I7, can help. Objective: To see if NT-I7 can boost the immune system. Eligibility: Adults 60 and older who have recently finished chemotherapy for breast, colorectal, or bladder cancer. Design: Participants will be screened with a physical exam, medical history, and blood and urine samples. Their heart s electrical activity will be checked. They will have an ultrasound of their spleen. They may give a tissue sample from a previous biopsy. Participants in phase 1a of the study will get 1 dose of NT-I7. It will be given by injection with a needle into the muscle of the upper arm, thigh, or buttocks. Participants in phase 1b will get 5 vaccines over a few months. They may get an optional booster and / or 6th vaccine. They will also get NT-I7. Participants will repeat the screening tests during the study. They may get a peripheral intravenous catheter in a vein in their hand or arm for blood draws. Participants may have apheresis. For this, blood is taken from an arm vein. The white blood cells are separated from the blood. The rest of the blood, minus the white blood cells, is returned into a vein in the other arm. A catheter may be used. Participants will have follow-up visits for 1 year.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland