Clinical Trials Using Prednisone

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Prednisone. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 101-110 of 110

  • Abiraterone Acetate, Prednisone, Leuprolide, Niraparib, and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for the Treatment of High Risk or Node Positive Prostate Cancer, The ASCLEPIuS Trial

    This phase I / II trial investigates the best dose of niraparib and how well it works when given together with abiraterone acetate, prednisone, leuprolide, and stereotactic body radiotherapy in treating patients with high risk or node positive prostate cancer. PARPs are proteins that help repair DNA mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as niraparib, can keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can't repair themselves, and they may stop growing. Abiraterone acetate and leuprolide may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of testosterone made by the body. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as prednisone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Stereotactic body radiotherapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method may kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving niraparib together with abiraterone acetate, prednisone, leuprolide and stereotactic body radiotherapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Split-Dose R-CHOP for Older Adults with Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy (split-dose rituximab, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin hydrochloride [doxorubicin], vincristine [Oncovin], prednisone [R-CHOP]) works in treating older patients with stage II-IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Rituximab (R) is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cyclophosphamide (C), doxorubicin (H), and vincristine (O), work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as prednisone (P) lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving R at the typical dose and CHOP in a split-dose may reduce side effects and interactions with other medications or medical conditions, thereby making it easier for older patients with DLBCL to tolerate.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Rituximab Hyaluronidase in Combination with Chemotherapy in Treating Aggressive B-cell Lymphoma in Uganda

    This phase I trial studies how well rituximab hyaluronidase and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients in Uganda with Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus associated multicentric Castleman disease. Rituximab hyaluronidase is a combination of rituximab and hyaluronidase. Rituximab binds to a molecule called CD20, which is found on B cells (a type of white blood cell) and some types of cancer cells. This may help the immune system kill cancer cells. Hyaluronidase allows rituximab to be given by injection under the skin. Giving rituximab and hyaluronidase by injection under the skin is faster than giving rituximab alone by infusion into the blood. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine, methotrexate, etoposide, doxorubicin, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. While rituximab has a clear survival benefit in patients within developed countries, differences in supportive care and infectious co-morbidities require special attention. Giving rituximab hyaluronidase alone or in combination with chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus associated multicentric Castleman disease compared to chemotherapy alone in Uganda.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Intensive Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well intensive combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, prednisone, leucovorin calcium, cytarabine, etoposide, and liposomal cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as mercaptopurine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Dietary supplements, such as levocarnitine, may reduce the incidence of liver damage. Pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy with, rituximab, mercaptopurine, levocarnitine, pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients with Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy with or without rituximab works in treating younger patients with stage III-IV non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibody, such as rituximab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy together with rituximab is more effective in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Cognitive Assessment and MRI Program in Identifying Cognitive Effects of Androgen Receptor Directed Therapies in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    This clinical trial studies how well cognitive assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) program work in identifying cognitive effects of androgen receptor directed therapies such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide in patients with prostate cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body. Cognitive assessment and MRI program may help to assess the cognitive function of patients during treatment and identify genetic variations that might make patients more or less sensitive to cognitive changes during treatment for prostate cancer.
    Location: 5 locations

  • High Dose Steroid Therapy (Prednisone or Methylprednisolone) for the Improvement of Symptoms of Late Radiation-Associated Lower Cranial Neuropathy in Oropharyngeal Cancer Survivors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effect and best dose of steroid therapy (prednisone or methylprednisolone) in improving symptoms of late radiation-associated lower cranial neuropathy in oropharyngeal cancer survivors. Steroid therapy with prednisone or methylprednisolone may help to improve symptoms associated with late radiation-associated lower cranial neuropathy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Role of Gut Microbiome and Fecal Transplant on Medication-Induced GI Complications in Patients with Melanoma or Genitourinary Cancer

    This trial studies the role of the gut microbiome and effectiveness of a fecal transplant on medication-induced gastrointestinal (GI) complications in patients with melanoma or genitourinary cancer. The gut microbiome (the bacteria and microorganisms that live in the digestive system) may affect whether or not someone develops colitis (inflammation of the intestines) during cancer treatment with immune-checkpoint inhibitor drugs. Studying samples of stool, blood, and tissue from patients with melanoma or genitourinary cancer may help doctors learn more about the effects of treatment on cells, and help doctors understand how well patients respond to treatment. Treatment with fecal transplantation may help to improve diarrhea and colitis symptoms.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Combined With Enzalutamide and Abiraterone Using Multiparametric MRI and 18FDCFPyL PET / CT in Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer

    Background: Prostate cancer is a common cancer among men. There are several ways to treat it, including hormone blocking drugs, radiation therapy, and surgery. Researchers want to combine abiraterone and enzalutamide to see if there is a better way to treat prostate cancer. They also want to study a new radiotracer called 18F-DCFPyL, with the help of a scan called positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET / CT) to see if there is a better way to detect prostate cancer. Objective: To develop improved techniques to localize and detect prostate cancer; and to develop new ways to treat prostate cancer Eligibility: Men ages 18 and older with prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body Design: - Participants will have a medical evaluation to determine eligibility for the study. - Participants will take three different medications daily by mouth and receive two injections during the course of the study. - Participants will have a medical evaluation monthly (for 6 months) while taking the medications. - Participants will have prostate MRI and PET / CT scans before treatment, 2 months after starting treatment and again before surgery. The radiotracer will be given by injection about 2 hours before the whole-body scan. The PET / CT scan itself is about an hour. - Participants may be asked to do a biopsy before treatment and 2 months after starting treatment. - Participants will have a full medical evaluation before surgery to remove their prostate. - Participants will have a follow-up visit 3 months after surgery and then as needed. - Participants will be contacted once a year for their PSA and testosterone levels for 5 years...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Fluciclovine (18F) PET / CT in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy

    This phase II trial studies the use of fluciclovine (18 fluorine [F]) positron emission tomography (PET) / computed tomography (CT) in predicting treatment response in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has come back or spread to other places in the body and are receiving chemotherapy. Fluciclovine (18F) is a radiotracer that accumulates in tumor cells and may be useful in imaging tumors using PET scans. PET / CT scans make detailed, computerized pictures of areas inside the body where fluciclovine (18F) accumulates. Diagnostic procedures, such as fluciclovine (18F) PET / CT, may help doctors predict treatment response in patients receiving chemotherapy.
    Location: 2 locations