Clinical Trials Using Prexasertib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Prexasertib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-7 of 7
  • Prexasertib, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Etoposide, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of prexasertib when given together with mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high risk myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Prexasertib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving prexasertib, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high risk myelodysplastic syndrome compared to mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Prexasertib and Anti-PD-L1 Monoclonal Antibody LY3300054 in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of prexasertib and anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody LY3300054 in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Prexasertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody LY3300054, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving prexasertib and anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody LY3300054 may work better in treating patients with solid tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Prexasertib and Olaparib in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of prexasertib and olaparib in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Prexasertib and olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Prexasertib in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors Exhibiting Replicative Stress or Homologous Recombination Repair Deficiency

    This phase II trial studies how well prexasertib works in treating patients with advanced solid tumors exhibiting replicative stress or homologous recombination repair deficiency. Prexasertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Phase II Single Arm Pilot Study of the Chk1 / 2 Inhibitor (LY2606368) in BRCA1 / 2 Mutation Associated Breast or Ovarian Cancer, Triple Negative Breast Cancer, High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer, and Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Background: - All cells go through cycles which allow them to divide. In normal cells, Chk1 and Chk2 (Chk1 / 2) stop cell division at various points to allow any damage to DNA to be repaired. - When Chk1 / 2 are not present, cells stop dividing and eventually die. LY2606368 blocks the Chk1 / 2 proteins. - Researchers hope that by blocking Chk1 / 2, it will cause tumor cells to die, thereby shrinking tumors. Objective: - To see if LY2606368 helps shrink tumors in patients with certain breast, ovarian or prostate cancers. Eligibility: - Patients at least 18 years old with breast or ovarian cancer. They must have a mutation in BRCA1 / 2 genes for group 1, high grade serious ovarian cancer without BRCA1 / 2 mutation for group 2, or triple negative breast cancer without BRCA1 / 2 mutation for group 3, or prostate cancer with or without BRCA1 / 2 mutation for group 4. Design: - Participants will be screened with a medical history and physical exam. They will have blood tests, an electrocardiogram (ECG) heart test, scans, and X-rays. They will have a piece of their tumor removed at entry (CT-assisted biopsy). - Study Day 1: Participants will have a physical exam and blood drawn. They may have a CT scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. - Day 1 and Day 15 of each 28-day cycle: Participants will receive the study drug through an IV. - Vital signs will be checked before and after. An ECG will be done within 1 hour after. - Day 15 and Day 28: Participants will have a physical exam, blood drawn, and a 12 lead ECG. - Cycle 1: Participants will have weekly phone calls and blood draws. Participants may have another CT-assisted biopsy at the end of cycle 1. - Cycle 2 and beyond, blood will be drawn every other week for routine blood tests. - Participants will have an after-study visit with a physical exam and blood tests. Participants may have another biopsy when they progressed on treatment. They will have scans of the chest, pelvis, and abdomen and a 12 lead ECG.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Prexasertib, Irinotecan, and Temozolomide for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor or Rhabdomyosarcoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose, the side effects, and how well prexasertib, irinotecan, and temozolomide work in treating patients with desmoplastic small cell tumor or rhabdomysosarcoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Prexasertib is a type of medication called a checkpoint kinase inhibitor. It works by stopping cancer cells from repairing damage to themselves and their deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (genes), which may lead to death of cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this study is to test whether prexasertib is a safe and effective treatment for patients with desmoplastic small round cell tumor or rhabdomyosarcoma when given with irinotecan and / or temozolomide.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Prexasertib with Cyclophosphamide or Gemcitabine in Treating Children and Adolescents with Recurrent or Refractory Medulloblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of prexasertib when given together with cyclophosphamide or gemcitabine in treating younger patients with a brain tumor called medulloblastoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Prexasertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and gemcitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving prexasertib in combination with cyclophosphamide and gemcitabine may cause tumors to stop growing or to shrink for a period of time and may lessen the symptoms, such as pain, that are caused by the tumor in patients with medulloblastoma.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee