Clinical Trials Using Radium Ra 223 Dichloride

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Radium Ra 223 Dichloride. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-14 of 14
  • Docetaxel with or without Radium Ra 223 Dichloride in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase III trial studies docetaxel and radium Ra 223 dichloride to see how well it works compared with docetaxel alone in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body, despite the surgical removal of the testes or medical intervention to block androgen production. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel and radium Ra 223 dichloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not known whether docetaxel with or without radium Ra 223 dichloride works better at treating metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: 30 locations

  • Olaparib and Radium Ra 223 Dichloride in Treating Men with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer That Has Spread to the Bone

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of olaparib and how well it works with radium Ra 223 dichloride in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to the bone and other places in the body (metastatic). Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radioactive drugs, such as radium Ra 223 dichloride, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Giving olaparib and radium Ra 223 dichloride may work better at treating castration-resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: 15 locations

  • Testing the Addition of a New Anti-cancer Drug, Radium-223 Dichloride, to the Usual Treatment (Cabozantinib) for Advanced Renal Cell Cancer That Has Spread to the Bone, the RadiCaL Study

    This phase II trial studies whether adding radium-223 dichloride to the usual treatment, cabozantinib, improves outcomes in patients with renal cell cancer that has spread to the bone. Radioactive drugs such as radium-223 dichloride may directly target radiation to cancer cells and minimize harm to normal cells. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving radium-223 dichloride and cabozantinib may help lessen the pain and symptoms from renal cell cancer that has spread to the bone, compared to cabozantinib alone.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Enzalutamide with or without Radium Ra 223 Dichloride in Patients with Metastatic, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well enzalutamide with or without radium Ra 223 dichloride in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor inhibitor that may slow down the growth of prostate cancer by blocking the action of the male hormone testosterone and other male hormones called androgens. Radiation therapy uses high energy alpha particles to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Enzalutamide with or without radium Ra 223 dichloride may work better in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Rapid Cycle Combination Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well rapid cycle combination therapy works in treating patients with prostate cancer that has not responded to surgery or hormone therapy and has spread to other places in the body. Androgen can cause the growth of tumor cells. Antihormone therapy, such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as radium Ra 223 dichloride, cabazitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Switching between different combinations of androgen deprivation therapy and chemotherapy after a short time may prevent drug resistance and help achieve better long-term control of prostate cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Nivolumab and Radium-223 for the Treatment of Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well nivolumab and radium-223 work in treating patients with prostate cancer that grows and continues to spread despite the surgical removal of the testes or medical intervention to block androgen production (castration resistant) and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Nivolumab is an anti-PD-1 antibody. Nivolumab works by attaching to and blocking a molecule called PD 1. PD 1 is a protein that is present on different types of cells in your immune system and controls parts of your immune system by shutting it down. Antibodies (proteins in the immune system which act to stop things like infection harming the body) that block PD 1 can potentially prevent PD 1 from shutting down the immune system, thus allowing immune cells to recognize and destroy cancer cells. Radioactive drugs, such as radium-223, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Giving nivolumab and radium-223 may work better than either one alone in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Testing the Addition of Radium Therapy (Radium-223 Dichloride) to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Paclitaxel) for Advanced Breast Cancer Spread to the Bones

    This phase II trial studies how well radium-223 dichloride and paclitaxel work in treating patients with advanced breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Radium-223 dichloride is a radioactive drug that behaves in a similar way to calcium and collects in cancer that has spread to the bones (bone metastases). The radioactive particles in radium-223 dichloride act on bone metastases, killing the tumor cells and reducing the pain that they can cause. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving radium-223 dichloride and paclitaxel may work better in treating patients with metastatic breast cancer compared to paclitaxel alone.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • SABR with or without Radium-223 for the Treatment of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) with or without radium-223 works in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to the bone (bone metastases) or soft tissue (soft tissue metastases). SABR uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Radioactive drugs, such as radium-223, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Giving SABR together with radium-223 may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer compared to SABR alone.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Fractionated Docetaxel and Radium 223 in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    The objective of this study is to determine the maximum safe dose of Ra-223 in combination with fractionated (split doses) docetaxel when given to subjects and to determine the best administering dose. The study will look at side effects that may happen while taking the combination treatment. A total of approximately 18 subjects will take part in the dose escalation part of the study and an additional 25 subjects will participate in the expansion cohort. This study will be conducted across four centers in the United States.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Radium Ra 223 Dichloride, Hormone Therapy and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase 2 trial studies radium Ra 223 dichloride, hormone therapy and stereotactic body radiation in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Radium Ra 223 dichloride contains a radioactive substance that collects in the bone and gives off radiation that may kill cancer cells. Hormone therapy using leuprolide acetate or goserelin acetate may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of testosterone the body makes. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving radium Ra 223 dichloride, hormone therapy and stereotactic body radiation may work better at treating prostate cancer.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Radium Ra 223 Dichloride and External Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer Metastatic in the Bone

    This phase II trial studies how well radium Ra 223 dichloride and external beam radiation therapy work in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to the bone. Radioactive drugs, such as radium Ra 223 dichloride, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving radium Ra 223 dichloride and external beam radiation therapy together may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Radium-223 in Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    Background: Some men who have been treated for localized prostate cancer with surgery or radiation still show signs of the disease in their blood. This is called biochemically recurrent prostate cancer. Radium-223 is a small molecule. It uses radiation to kill cancer cells and improves survival in advanced prostate cancer. Researchers want to see if it can treat prostate cancer and induced immune changes earlier in the disease when the cancer is only detectable by prostate specific antigen (PSA) in the blood. Objective: To learn how Radium-223 affects men with rising PSA but no evidence of cancer on conventional CT or bone scan, but positive findings on PET or molecular imaging in the bones. The primary focus is impact on the immune system with secondary focus on impact on PSA and imaging. Eligibility: Men ages 18 and older with prostate cancer who have had surgery and / or radiation, but their PSA is rising even though no disease is visible on routine imaging scans (CT or bone scans). Patients are required to have PET or molecular imaging findings in bones, but not organs (lymph nodes are allowed). Design: Participants will be screened with a medical history and physical exam. Their ability to do normal tasks will be reviewed. They will give tissue samples or a report from their doctor about their cancer. They will have blood and urine tests. They will have an electrocardiogram to measure heart function. They will have a scan of their chest and abdomen using radiation or magnetic resonance imaging. They will have a bone scan with injection of Tc99. They will have a positron emission tomography scan with intravenous (IV) injection of 18F-NaF. Participants will get Radium-223 by IV. For this, a small plastic tube is put into an arm vein. Radium-223 will be given on Day 1 of each cycle (1 cycle = 4 weeks) for up to 6 cycles. Participants will repeat the screening tests during the study. They will also complete Quality of Life Surveys and give stool samples. After treatment, participants will have long-term follow-up every 6 weeks for the rest of their lives.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Radiation Medication (Radium-223 dichloride) versus Radium-223 dichloride plus Radiation Enhancing Medication (M3814) versus Radium-223 dichloride plus M3814 plus Avelumab (a type of immunotherapy) for Advanced Prostate Cancer Not Responsive to Hormonal Therapy

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose of M3814 when given together with radium-223 dichloride or with radium-223 dichloride and avelumab and to see how well they work in treating patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer that had spread to other places in the body (metastatic). M3814 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radioactive drugs, such as radium-223 dichloride, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This study is being done to find out the better treatment between radium-223 dichloride alone, radium-223 dichloride in combination with M3814, or radium-223 dichloride in combination with both M3814 and avelumab, to lower the chance of prostate cancer growing or spreading in the bone, and if this approach is better or worse than the usual approach for advanced prostate cancer not responsive to hormonal therapy.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Impact of DNA Repair Pathway Alterations on Sensitivity to Radium-223 in Bone Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase II study investigates how well radium-223 works in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer than has spread to the bones (bone metastases). Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer death. Furthermore, many men with notably advanced disease have been found to have abnormalities in DNA repair. The purpose of this research is to study the role of a DNA repair pathway in prostate cancer, specifically in response to administration of radium-223, an FDA-approved drug known to cause DNA damage to cancerous cells. Understanding how defects in the DNA repair pathway affects radium-223 treatment of prostate, may help doctors help plan effective treatment in future patients.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington