Clinical Trials Using Romidepsin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Romidepsin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-13 of 13
  • Chemotherapy, Stem Cell Transplant, and Romidepsin in Treating Patients with T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy, stem cell transplant, and romidepsin work in treating patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. The patient’s stem cells that were previously collected are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as romidepsin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving romidepsin following stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Duvelisib and Romidepsin or Bortezomib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory T-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of duvelisib when given together with romidepsin or bortezomib in treating patients with T-cell lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Duvelisib, romidepsin, and bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Cisplatin, Romidepsin and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of romidepsin when given together with cisplatin and nivolumab, to see how well they work in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has come back at or near the same place as the original (primary) tumor, usually after a period of time during which the cancer could not be detected or spread to other parts of the body. Romidepsin may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Romidepsin may also help cisplatin work better. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving romidepsin together with cisplatin and nivolumab may be a better treatment for tripe negative breast cancer.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Safety and Efficacy of Tenalisib (RP6530) in Combination With Romidepsin in Patients With Relapsed / Refractory T-cell Lymphoma

    To characterize safety, tolerability and to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of Tenalisib in combination with Romidepsin in patients with R / R T-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Study of Ixazomib and Romidepsin in Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma (PTCL)

    Single arm phase I / II study of ixazomib and romidepsin in relapsed / refractory PTCL. Each cycle is 28 days. Patients will continue to receive therapy until progressive disease, unacceptable toxicity, or if any other withdrawal criteria are met. The phase I study includes three dose levels. The phase II study will include treatment with ixazomib and romidepsin at the MTD established in the Phase I study.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Romidepsin and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate how safe and effective the combination of the study drugs romidepsin and lenalidomide is for treating patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) who have not been previously treated for this cancer. Currently, there is no standard treatment for patients with PTCL; the most common treatment used is a combination of drugs called CHOP, but this can be a difficult treatment to tolerate because of side effects, and is not particularly effective for most patients with PTCL. Romidepsin (Istodax) is a type of drug called an HDAC inhibitor. It interacts with DNA (genetic material in cells) in ways that can stop tumors from growing. It is given as an infusion through the veins. Lenalidomide (Revlimid) is a type of drug known as an immunomodulatory drug, or IMID for short. This drug affects how tumor cells grow and survive, including affecting blood vessel growth in tumors. It is given as an oral tablet (by mouth).
    Location: 4 locations

  • Pralatrexate and Romidepsin in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I / IIa trial studies the side effects and the best dose of pralatrexate and romidepsin and to see how well they work in treating patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Pralatrexate may slow, stop, or decrease the growth of cancer cells by blocking how cells are made. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pralatrexate together with romidepsin may work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, or multiple myeloma
    Location: 3 locations

  • Azacitidine and Romidepsin in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoid Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of azacitidine when given together with romidepsin and to see how well they work in treating patients with lymphoid malignancies that have come back or do not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving azacitidine together with romidepsin may be an effective treatment for lymphoid malignancies.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Durvalumab, Pralatrexate, Romidepsin, and Oral Azacitidine in Treating Patients with Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I and IIa trial studies the side effects and best dose of durvalumab, pralatrexate, romidepsin, and oral azacitidine, and to see how well they work in treating patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Pralatrexate is a chemotherapy drug that blocks how cells are made and therefore the growth of cancer cells can be slowed, stopped, or decreased. Romidepsin is another type of chemotherapy drug that helps stop the growth of cancer cells and can help kill cancer cells. Oral azacitidine prevents the body from making deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) that cells need to grow, which stops the growth of cancer cells and causes them to die. It is not yet known which combination of these drugs work best in treating patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Romidepsin and Brentuximab Vedotin in Treating Patients with Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of romidepsin when given together with brentuximab vedotin in treating patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as brentuximab vedotin, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving romidepsin and brentuximab vedotin together may work better in treating patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
    Location: Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Romidepsin in Conditioning and Maintenance in Patients with T-cell Leukemia or Lymphoma Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of romidepsin when given together with busulfan and fludarabine phosphate before donor stem cell transplant (SCT) (conditioning) and alone after SCT (maintenance) in treating patients with T-cell leukemia or lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as romidepsin, busulfan, and fludarabine phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving romidepsin together with busulfan and fludarabine phosphate may help prevent the patient's body from rejecting transplanted cells, and help kill any cancer cells that are in the body. Maintenance romidepsin may keep the cancer cells from coming back after the transplant.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Carfilzomib with or without Romidepsin in Treating Patients with Stage IA-IVB Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    This randomized phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of carfilzomib when given together with or without romidepsin in treating patients with stage IA-IVB cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Carfilzomib and romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving carfilzomib alone is more effective than when given together with romidepsin.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Direct Tumor Microinjection and FDG-PET in Testing Drug Sensitivity in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Stage IV Breast Cancer

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of direct tumor microinjection and fludeoxyglucose F-18 positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in testing drug sensitivity in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or stage IV breast cancer that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Injecting tiny amounts of anti-cancer drugs directly into tumors on the skin or in lymph nodes and diagnostic procedures, such as FDG-PET, may help to show which drugs work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or breast cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota