Clinical Trials Using Sodium Thiosulfate

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Sodium Thiosulfate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-5 of 5
  • Methotrexate, Mannitol, Rituximab, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of methotrexate, mannitol, rituximab, and carboplatin and to see how well they work in treating patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption uses mannitol to open the blood vessels around the brain and allow cancer-killing substances to be carried directly to the brain. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving methotrexate, mannitol, rituximab, and carboplatin together may be an effective treatment for primary central nervous system lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Heated Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy and Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer With Positive Peritoneal Cytology

    Background: Gastric cancer is a common and serious cancer. Standard treatment is chemotherapy drugs. Researchers want to see if a new treatment helps. It is surgical removal of the cancer and heated chemotherapy delivered to the abdominal cavity called HIPEC. Objective: To test if surgical removal of tumors plus heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy can improve survival in people with gastric cancers. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with gastric cancer who can have most tumors surgically removed Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Scans - Tissue sample from previous surgery - Endoscopy with biopsy: A tube with a camera goes through the mouth and into the stomach. It and takes a sample of stomach tissue. Participants might may get medicine to make them drowsy. - Laparoscopy: Small cuts are made in the abdomen. A thin tube with a light and camera is inserted into the abdomen. Participants sleep through the procedure. Participants will stay in the hospital. They will have: - Surgery to remove as many tumors as possible. - HIPEC for 60 minutes: Two thin tubes are put into the abdomen. Two chemotherapy drugs are given through one tube. They are drained out through another at a temperature a few degrees above normal body temperature. Another drug is given in a vein. Recovery for 7-21 days: Participants will have tubes in their stomach and bladder and IVs for a few days. They will get pain medicine, IV fluids, antibiotics, and blood transfusions as needed. Participants will have visits every few months for 3 years, then one a year. Visits include physical exam, blood tests, and scans. They also include dietary assessment and questions.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Carboplatin, Melphalan, Etoposide Phosphate, Mannitol, and Sodium Thiosulfate in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Brain Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan when given together with carboplatin, etoposide phosphate, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate and to see how well they work in treating patients with previously treated brain tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan, carboplatin, and etoposide phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) uses mannitol to open the blood vessels around the brain and allow cancer-killing substances to be carried directly to the brain. Sodium thiosulfate may help lessen or prevent hearing loss and toxicities in patients undergoing chemotherapy with carboplatin and BBBD. Giving carboplatin, melphalan, etoposide phosphate, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate together may be an effective treatment for brain tumors.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Sodium Thiosulfate in Preventing Low Platelet Count While Treating Patients with Malignant Brain Tumors

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well giving combination chemotherapy with or without sodium thiosulfate works in preventing low platelet count while treating patients with malignant brain tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Sodium thiosulfate may prevent low platelet counts in patients receiving chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without sodium thiosulfate in preventing low platelet count during treatment for brain tumors.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Heated Intra-peritoneal Chemotherapy with Doxorubicin and Cisplatin for the Treatment of Resectable, Refractory, or Recurrent Abdominal or Pelvic Tumors in Pediatric Patients, T.O.A.S.T. I.T. Study

    This early phase I trial studies how well heated intra-peritoneal chemotherapy with doxorubicin and cisplatin work for the treatment of abdominal or pelvic tumors that can be removed by surgery (resectable), does not respond to treatment (refractory), or has come back (recurrent). Heated intra-peritoneal chemotherapy is a procedure performed in combination with abdominal surgery for cancer that has spread to the abdomen. It involves the infusion of a heated chemotherapy solution that circulates into the abdominal cavity. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Heating a chemotherapy solution and infusing it directly into the abdomen may kill more cells.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota