Clinical Trials Using Temozolomide

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Temozolomide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-84 of 84

  • Whole Brain Radiation Therapy with Standard Temozolomide Chemo-Radiotherapy and Plerixafor in Treating Patients with Glioblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well whole brain radiation therapy works with standard temozolomide chemo-radiotherapy and plerixafor in treating patients with glioblastoma (brain tumor). Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Plerixafor is a drug that may prevent recurrence of glioblastoma after radiation treatment. Giving whole brain radiation therapy with standard temozolomide chemo-radiotherapy and plerixafor may work better in treating patients with glioblastoma.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Atezolizumab in Combination with Temozolomide and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well atezolizumab works in combination with temozolomide and radiation therapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not yet known how well atezolizumab works in combination with temozolomide and radiation therapy in treating patients with glioblastoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Autologous CMV-Specific Cytotoxic T Cells and Temozolomide in Treating Patients with Glioblastoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of autologous cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific cytotoxic T cells when given together with temozolomide and to see how well they work in treating patients with glioblastoma. Autologous CMV-specific cytotoxic T cells may stimulate the immune system to attack specific tumor cells and stop them from growing or kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, may work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving autologous CMV-specific cytotoxic T cells with temozolomide may be a better treatment for patients with glioblastoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Phase 3 Randomized, Double-blind, Controlled Study of ICT-107 in Glioblastoma

    ICT-107 consists of dendritic cells, prepared from autologous mononuclear cells that are pulsed with six synthetic peptides that were derived from tumor associated antigens (TAA) present on glioblastoma tumor cells. This is a Phase 3 study to evaluate ICT-107 in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Subjects will be randomized to receive standard of care chemoradiation (temozolomide (TMZ) with either ICT-107 or a blinded control. Reinfusion with the pulsed dendritic cells should stimulate cytotoxic T cells to specifically target glioblastoma tumour cells.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Testing Ramipril to Prevent Memory Loss in People with Glioblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well ramipril works in preventing cognitive decline in patients with glioblastoma or gliosarcoma who are undergoing brain radiation therapy and chemotherapy with temozolomide. Adding ramipril to standard of care treatment may help to lower the chance of memory loss.
    Location: 103 locations

  • Implantable Microdevice for the Evaluation of Drug Response in Patients with Primary Brain Tumors

    This early phase I trial studies the feasibility and safety of an implantable microdevice for the evaluation of drug response in patients with primary brain tumors. Brain tumors are known to be very different from each other and respond differently to different drugs. It would be very helpful to find out what drugs have the best chance of working in each specific tumor. This research study involves drugs that are released by a small device, as small as the tip of a needle, that is inserted by a neurosurgeon into the tumor at the time of surgery and is then removed by the end of the surgery. The goal of this research study is to prove that these small devices can be used to find out which drugs have better effects on treating tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Hyperpolarized Imaging in Diagnosing Patients with Glioma

    This pilot trial studies the side effects of hyperpolarized carbon C 13 pyruvate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing patients with glioma. Diagnostic procedures, such as hyperpolarized carbon C 13 pyruvate MRI, may help find and diagnose glioma and find out how far the disease has spread.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Standard Chemotherapy vs. Chemotherapy Guided by Cancer Stem Cell Test in Recurrent Glioblastoma

    The purpose of this clinical study is to confirm the utility of chemosensitivity tumor testing on cancer stem cells (ChemoID) as a predictor of clinical response in poor prognosis malignant brain tumors such as recurrent glioblastoma (GBM).
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Implantable Microdevice for the Delivery of Drugs and their Effect on Tumors in Patients with Metastatic or Recurrent Sarcoma

    This early phase I trial studies the side effects of implanting and removing a microdevice in patients with sarcomas that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or have come back (recurrent). Microdevices are rice-sized devices that are implanted into tumor tissue and are loaded with 10 different drugs that are delivered at very small doses, or "microdoses," which may only affect a very small, local area inside the tumor. The purpose of this study is to determine which drugs delivered in the microdevice affect tumor tissue in patients with sarcomas.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas