Clinical Trials Using Therapeutic Autologous Dendritic Cells

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Therapeutic Autologous Dendritic Cells. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-4 of 4
  • Modified Immune Cells (Autologous Dendritic Cells) and a Vaccine (Prevnar) after High-Dose External Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Unresectable Liver Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies the side effects of autologous dendritic cells and a vaccine called Prevnar in treating patients with liver cancer that cannot be removed by surgery after undergoing standard high-dose external beam radiotherapy. Autologous dendritic cells are immune cells generated from patients' own white blood cells that are grown in a special lab and trained to stimulate the immune system to destroy tumor cells. A pneumonia vaccine called Prevnar may also help stimulate the immune system. Giving autologous dendritic cells and Prevnar to patients with liver cancer after radiotherapy may help doctors determine if it is possible to stimulate the body's own immune system to fight against the tumor, and to see if this immune stimulation can be done safely.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Dendritic Cell Therapy after Cryosurgery in Combination with Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase Ib / II trial studies how well dendritic cell therapy after cryosurgery in combination with pembrolizumab works in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery. Vaccines made from a person's white blood cells mixed with tumor proteins may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Cryosurgery, also known as cryoablation or cryotherapy, kills tumor cells by freezing them. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving dendritic cell therapy after cryosurgery in combination with pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with melanoma.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Survivin Vaccine: Multiple Myeloma Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplant (HCT)

    This early phase I studies the side effects of dendritic cell survivin vaccine and how well it works in treating patients with multiple myeloma who are undergoing stem cell transplant. Vaccines made from a gene-modified virus may help the body build an effective immune response to kill cancer cells.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes and High-Dose Aldesleukin with or without Autologous Dendritic Cells in Treating Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose aldesleukin with or without autologous dendritic cells work in treating patients with melanoma that has spread to other areas of the body. Vaccines made from a person's tumor cells and special blood cells (dendritic cells) may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Aldesleukin may stimulate the white blood cells to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose aldesleukin are more effective when given together with or without dendritic cells in shrinking or slowing the growth of melanoma. The clinical benefits of receiving tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in combination with the B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine / threonine kinase (BRAF) inhibitor will be studied, in patients who have progressive disease (PD) with using the BRAF inhibitor prior to TIL treatment. Leptomeningeal disease (LMD) is unfortunately a common development in patients with melanoma, with an extremely poor prognosis, translating into an overall survival of only weeks. With the novel approach of combining intrathecal TILs and intrathecal interleukin (IL)-2, researchers hope to induce long term disease stabilization or remission of LMD.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas