Clinical Trials Using Vismodegib

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Vismodegib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-12 of 12
  • NCI-MATCH: Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients with Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.
    Location: 1160 locations

  • Clinical and Molecular Risk-Directed Craniospinal Irradiation and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly Diagnosed Medulloblastoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies clinical and molecular risk-directed craniospinal irradiation and combination chemotherapy in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, vismodegib, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and pemetrexed disodium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving clinical and molecular risk-directed radiation therapy and combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 13 locations

  • My Pathway: A Study Evaluating Herceptin / Perjeta, Tarceva, Zelboraf / Cotellic, Erivedge, Alecensa, and Tecentriq Treatment Targeted Against Certain Molecular Alterations in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This multicenter, non-randomized, open-label study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of six treatment regimens in participants with advanced solid tumors for whom therapies that will convey clinical benefit are not available and / or are not suitable options per the treating physician's judgment.
    Location: 17 locations

  • TAPUR: Testing the Use of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Approved Drugs That Target a Specific Abnormality in a Tumor Gene in People With Advanced Stage Cancer

    The purpose of the study is to learn from the real world practice of prescribing targeted therapies to patients with advanced cancer whose tumor harbors a genomic variant known to be a drug target or to predict sensitivity to a drug. NOTE: Due to character limits, the arms section does NOT include all TAPUR Study relevant biomarkers. For additional information, contact TAPUR@asco.org, or if a patient, your nearest participating TAPUR site (see participating centers).
    Location: 6 locations

  • Radiation Therapy and Vismodegib in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy and vismodegib work in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vismodegib, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving radiation therapy together with chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Pembrolizumab with or without Vismodegib in Treating Skin Basal Cell Cancer That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase Ib trial studies how well pembrolizumab with or without vismodegib works in treating patients with skin basal cell cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Vismodegib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether pembrolizumab is better alone or together with vismodegib in treating skin basal cell cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Photodynamic Therapy and Vismodegib in Treating Patients with Multiple Basal Cell Cancers

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best way to give photodynamic therapy together with vismodegib in treating patients with multiple basal cell cancers. Photodynamic therapy uses a drug, such as aminolevulinic acid that becomes active when it is exposed to light. The activated drug may kill tumor cells. Vismodegib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking a type of protein involved in tissue growth. Giving photodynamic therapy with vismodegib may be a better treatment for basal cell cancer.
    Location: The University of Arizona Medical Center-University Campus, Tucson, Arizona

  • Vismodegib in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Recurrent Orbital or Periocular Basal Cell Cancer

    This phase IV trial studies how well vismodegib works in treating patients with orbital or periocular basal cell cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or has come back (recurrent). Vismodegib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Vismodegib in Treating Patients with Steroid-Refractory Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well vismodegib works in treating patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease that did not respond to previous steroid treatment. Chronic graft-versus-host disease can cause a build-up of scar tissue under the skin and lead to symptoms such as sclerodermatous skin changes, dry mouth, dry eye, narrowing of the esophagus, or vaginal graft-versus-host disease. Vismodegib may work against the build-up of scar tissue and be a better treatment for chronic graft-versus-host disease caused by a hematopoietic stem cell transplant.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Vismodegib and FAK Inhibitor GSK2256098 in Treating Patients with Progressive Meningiomas

    This phase II trial studies how well vismodegib and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor GSK2256098 work in treating patients with meningioma that is growing, spreading, or getting worse. Vismodegib and FAK inhibitor GSK2256098 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 586 locations

  • Sirolimus and Vismodegib in Treatment of Patients with Solid Tumors or Pancreatic Cancer That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of sirolimus when given together with vismodegib in treating patients with solid tumors or pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery. Sirolimus and vismodegib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study of Vismodegib (GDC-0449) in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma

    This is an open-label, non-comparative, multicenter, expanded access study of Vismodegib (GDC-0449) in patients with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or metastatic BCC (mBCC) who are otherwise without satisfactory treatment options.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.