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Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies Treatment (PDQ®)

Patient Version
Last Modified: 06/05/2014

Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

Newly Diagnosed Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission
Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia
Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia
Recurrent Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia
Children with Down Syndrome and AML
Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia
Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia
Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder
Myelodysplastic Syndromes



Newly Diagnosed Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Treatment of newly diagnosed childhood acute myeloid leukemia may include the following:

Treatment of newly diagnosed childhood acute leukemia with a granulocytic sarcoma (chloroma) may include chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy.

Treatment of therapy -related AML is usually the same as for newly diagnosed AML, followed by stem cell transplant.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with untreated childhood acute myeloid leukemia and other myeloid malignancies. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. Talk with your child's doctor about clinical trials that may be right for your child. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

Treatment of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) during the remission phase (consolidation /intensification therapy) depends on the subtype of AML and may include the following:

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with childhood acute myeloid leukemia in remission. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. Talk with your child's doctor about clinical trials that may be right for your child. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Treatment of recurrent childhood acute myeloid leukemia may include the following:

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent childhood acute myeloid leukemia. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. Talk with your child's doctor about clinical trials that may be right for your child. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia may include the following:

Supportive care treatments are used to manage problems caused by the disease, such as infection, bleeding, and anemia.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with childhood acute promyelocytic leukemia (M3). For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. Talk with your child's doctor about clinical trials that may be right for your child. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Recurrent Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

Treatment of recurrent acute promyelocytic leukemia may include the following:

Children with Down Syndrome and AML

Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia in children who have Down syndrome may include combination chemotherapy plus central nervous system sanctuary therapy with intrathecal chemotherapy.

Treatment of recurrent AML in children with Down syndrome is chemotherapy. It is not clear if stem cell transplant after chemotherapy is helpful in treating these children.

Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

Treatment for childhood chronic myelogenous leukemia may include the following:

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with childhood chronic myelogenous leukemia. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. Talk with your child's doctor about clinical trials that may be right for your child. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

Treatment of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) may include the following:

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. Talk with your child's doctor about clinical trials that may be right for your child. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder

Transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD) usually goes away on its own. For TMD that does not go away on its own, treatment may include the following:

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with acute myeloid leukemia/transient myeloproliferative disorder. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. Talk with your child's doctor about clinical trials that may be right for your child. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) may include the following:

Supportive care treatments are used to manage problems caused by the disease, such as infection, bleeding, and anemia.

If the MDS progresses to acute myeloid leukemia (AML), treatment will be the same as treatment for the newly diagnosed patient with AML.

Treatment of therapy-related MDS is usually the same as for newly diagnosed AML, followed by stem cell transplant.

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with childhood myelodysplastic syndromes. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. Talk with your child's doctor about clinical trials that may be right for your child. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.