Clinical Trials Using Mitomycin

  • Resize font
  • Print
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Mitomycin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-8 of 8
  • Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin or Mitomycin and Fluorouracil in Treating Patients with Non-Muscle Invasive Stage I Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy when given together with cisplatin or mitomycin and fluorouracil prevents cancer from returning after surgery in patients with bladder cancer that has not invaded the bladder muscle but has not responded to standard treatment. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, mitomycin, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving these chemotherapy drugs may make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy.
    Location: 65 locations

  • Mitomycin C or Floxuridine and Leucovorin Calcium during or after Surgery in Treating Patients with Appendiceal, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well mitomycin C or floxuridine and leucovorin calcium during or after surgery works in treating patients with appendiceal, colon, or rectal cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin C, floxuridine, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether heating a chemotherapy solution and infusing it directly into the abdomen during surgery kills more tumor cells than infusing a chemotherapy solution directly into the abdomen after surgery.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Heated Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy and Surgery in Treating Patients with Stomach Cancer and Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    This phase II trial studies how well heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy and surgery work in treating patients with stomach cancer that has spread to the peritoneum, the tissue that lines the wall of the abdomen and abdominal organs. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and mitomycin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving heated chemotherapy drugs directly into the abdomen after surgery may prevent or increase the length of time it takes for the tumors to grow back.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Minimally-Invasive Cytoreduction and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Low-Volume Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    This clinical trial studies a minimally-invasive cytoreduction and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in treating patients with a small amount (low-volume) of peritoneal carcinomatosis, which is a term used to describe the widespread of cancerous tumors in the peritoneal cavity. Minimally-invasive cytoreduction is a less invasive type of surgery for peritoneal carcinomatosis and may have fewer side effects and improve recovery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin C, cisplatin, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Heating a chemotherapy solution and infusing it directly into the abdomen may kill more tumor cells. Giving minimally-invasive cytoreduction with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy may work better in treating peritoneal carcinomatosis.
    Location: University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

  • Mitomycin in Treating Patients with P16 Positive Oropharyngeal or P16 Negative Head and Neck Cancer That is Resistant to Platin, Fluorouracil, Cetuximab, and Taxane

    This phase II trial studies how well mitomycin works in treating patients with tumor protein (p)16 positive oropharyngeal or p16 negative head and neck squamous cell cancer that is resistant to platin, fluorouracil, cetuximab, and taxane. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Cytoreductive Surgery and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Mitomycin C Followed by Standard Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    This phase II trial studies how well cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal mitomycin C followed by standard chemotherapy works in treating patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis. Cytoreductive surgery helps to reduce the number of cancer cells prior to treatment. Hyperthermia therapy kills tumor cells by heating them to several degrees above normal body temperature. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin C, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Infusing mitomycin C directly into the abdomen may kill more tumor cells while reducing side effects. Giving cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal mitomycin C may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Montefiore Medical Center-Weiler Hospital, Bronx, New York

  • Maximal Transurethral Surgery Followed by Accelerated Methotrexate, Vinblastine, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well maximal maximal transurethral surgery (surgery performed with a special instrument inserted through the urethra) followed by accelerated methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin hydrochloride, cisplatin, and radiation therapy works in treating patients with bladder cancer that has spread to the muscle. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cisplatin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. Giving combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Embolization Therapy with or without Chemotherapy in Controlling Liver Metastases in Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumor Metastases to the Liver That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well embolization therapy with or without chemotherapy works in controlling liver metastases in patients with neuroendocrine tumors which have spread to the liver and cannot be removed by surgery. Embolization therapy injects tiny particles with or without chemotherapy drugs into the arteries feeding tumors to cut off their blood supply. Embolization with chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride and mitomycin or doxorubicin-eluting beads, may kill more tumor cells by allowing a higher concentration of the drug to reach the tumor for a longer period of time. It is not yet known if there are differences in quality of life, side effects, or safety among these types of embolization therapy or if any one type will provide longer-lasting control of tumors in the liver.
    Location: 14 locations