Clinical Trials Using Mesna

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Mesna. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-8 of 8
  • Alisertib Alone or in Combination with Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent, Progressive, or Newly Diagnosed Central Nervous System Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors or Extra-Central Nervous System Malignant Rhabdoid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well alisertib alone or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy works in treating younger patients with central nervous system (CNS) atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors that are newly diagnosed; have returned; or are growing, spreading, or getting worse or extra-CNS malignant rhabdoid tumors that have returned or are growing, spreading, or getting worse. Alisertib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein called aurora kinase A that is needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving alisertib alone or with chemotherapy and radiation therapy may be effective in treating patients with rhabdoid tumors.
    Location: 10 locations

  • HLA-Mismatched Unrelated Donor Bone Marrow Transplantation With Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide

    This is a multi-center, single arm Phase II study of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) using human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched unrelated bone marrow transplantation donors and post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy), sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis in patients with hematologic malignancies.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Donor TCR Alpha-Beta and CD19-Depleted Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Lymphomas

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well donor T cell receptor (TCR) alpha-beta and cluster of differentiation (CD) 19-depleted (removed) stem cell transplant works in treating patients with lymphoma that has come back after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are given before transplant to help make room in the bone marrow for transplanted cells and kill any remaining cancer cells. They may also help stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. Before the donor's stem cells are infused into the patient, TCR alpha-beta and CD19 cells are removed. These cells are thought to cause graft-versus-host disease, a condition in which the transplanted cells make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving chemotherapy before transplant and removing TCR alpha-beta and CD19 cells from the stem cell graft may help improve the outcome of the transplant and result in lower rates of graft-versus host disease.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose, or myeloablative, chemotherapy and stem cell transplant works in treating patients with neuroblastoma that is at high risk of spreading. Myeloablative chemotherapy uses high doses of chemotherapy to kill cells in the bone marrow, both cancer cells and healthy cells. Healthy stem cells from the patient that were collected before chemotherapy are then returned to the patient in a stem cell transplant to replace the cells that were killed by chemotherapy. Myeloablative chemotherapy and stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Palifermin in Preventing Graft-versus-Host Disease in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of palifermin and to see how well it works in preventing graft-versus-host disease in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving palifermin before the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Ex-Vivo Expanded and Activated Donor NK Cells and Hu14.18-IL2 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of ex-vivo expanded and activated donor NK cells and hu14.18-IL2 in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Expanded and activated donor NK cells may be able to kill the cancer cells better. Hu14.18-IL2 binds to NK cells and may be able to activate them, improving their ability to stay alive, multiply, and kill cancer cells. Giving ex-vivo expanded and activated donor NK cells and hu14.18-IL2 may work better in treating patients with neuroblastoma.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Rolapitant Hydrochloride in Preventing Nausea / Vomiting in Patients with Sarcoma Receiving Chemotherapy

    This phase II trial studies how well rolapitant hydrochloride works in preventing nausea / vomiting in patients with sarcoma receiving chemotherapy. Antiemetic drugs, such as rolapitant hydrochloride, may help control or prevent nausea and vomiting in patients treated with chemotherapy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Calcineurin Inhibitor-Free Interventions for Prevention of Graft-versus-Host Disease (BMT CTN 1301)

    The study is designed as a three arm randomized Phase III, multicenter trial comparing two calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-free strategies for Graft-versus-Host Disease (GVHD) prophylaxis to standard tacrolimus and methotrexate (Tac / Mtx) in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
    Location: 17 locations