Clinical Trials Using Epirubicin Hydrochloride

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Epirubicin Hydrochloride. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-7 of 7
  • Study of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) Plus Chemotherapy vs Placebo Plus Chemotherapy as Neoadjuvant Therapy and Pembrolizumab vs Placebo as Adjuvant Therapy in Participants With Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) (MK-3475-522 / KEYNOTE-522)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pembrolizumab (MK-3475) plus chemotherapy vs placebo plus chemotherapy as neoadjuvant therapy and pembrolizumab vs placebo as adjuvant therapy in participants who have triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). After a screening phase of approximately 28 days, each participant will receive neoadjuvant study treatment (Pembrolizumab + Chemotherapy OR Placebo + Chemotherapy) based on the randomization schedule for approximately 24 weeks (8 cycles). Each participant will then undergo definitive surgery 3-6 weeks after conclusion of the last cycle of the neoadjuvant study treatment. After definitive surgery, each participant will receive adjuvant study treatment (Pembrolizumab OR Placebo) for approximately 27 weeks (9 cycles). Following adjuvant study treatment, each participant will be monitored for safety, survival and disease recurrence. The primary study hypothesis is that pembrolizumab is superior to placebo, in combination with chemotherapy, as measured by the rate of Pathological Complete Response (pCR) and / or Event-free Survival (EFS), in participants with locally advanced TNBC.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin before Surgery in Treating Nigerian Women with Stage IIA-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well paclitaxel works with carboplatin before surgery in treating Nigerian women with stage IIA-IIIC breast cancer before surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Localized Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy and pembrolizumab work in treating patients with previously untreated cancer limited to the gastric or gastroesophageal junction. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, capecitabine, and epirubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving combination chemotherapy and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer.
    Location: Columbia University / Herbert Irving Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Molecular Profile-Directed Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic HER2 Negative Esophagogastric Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies molecular profile-directed chemotherapy (otherwise known as personalized treatment) in treating patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative esophagogastric cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Studying the genes in a patient’s tumor cells may help doctors plan the most effective treatment.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia

  • Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride and carboplatin followed by surgery and paclitaxel work in treating patients with stage II-III breast cancer that does not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) / neu protein (triple negative). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, carboplatin, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride and carboplatin before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride and carboplatin followed by surgery and paclitaxel may be an effective treatment for breast cancer.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Sorafenib Tosylate, Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Surgery in Treating Patients with High-Risk Stage IIB-IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well sorafenib tosylate, combination chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery work in treating patients with high-risk stage IIB-IV soft tissue sarcoma. Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as epirubicin hydrochloride and ifosfamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving sorafenib tosylate, combination chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery may be an effective treatment for soft tissue sarcoma.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Clinical Trial of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy With Atezolizumab or Placebo in Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Followed After Surgery by Atezolizumab or Placebo

    The main purpose of this study is to learn if the usual chemotherapy given before surgery (neoadjuvant therapy) for breast cancer plus the experimental drug, atezolizumab, is better than the usual chemotherapy plus a placebo. (A placebo is a drug that looks like the study drug but contains no medication.) The usual chemotherapy in this study is paclitaxel (WP) and carboplatin followed by doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC) or epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC). Usually, after neoadjuvant therapy and surgery for triple negative breast cancer, no additional treatment is given unless the cancer returns. This study will also look at continuing treatment after surgery with atezolizumab or the placebo. To be better, atezolizumab given with the neoadjuvant therapy should be better at: 1) decreasing the amount of tumor in the breast than the placebo given with the usual chemotherapy and 2) decreasing the chance of the cancer from returning after surgery. Another purpose of this study is to test the good and bad effects of atezolizumab when added to the usual chemotherapy. Atezolizumab may keep your cancer from growing but it can also cause side effects.
    Location: Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina