Clinical Trials Using Ifosfamide

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Ifosfamide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 25
  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Ganitumab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy with or without ganitumab works in treating patients with newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma that has spread to other parts of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ganitumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without ganitumab in treating patients with newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma.
    Location: 294 locations

  • Radiation Therapy with or without Combination Chemotherapy or Pazopanib Hydrochloride before Surgery in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Non-rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well pazopanib hydrochloride, combination chemotherapy, and radiation therapy work and compares it to radiation therapy alone or in combination with pazopanib hydrochloride or combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas that can be removed by surgery. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ifosfamide and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Pazopanib hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy works better when given with or without combination chemotherapy and / or pazopanib hydrochloride in treating patients with non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas.
    Location: 342 locations

  • Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 56 locations

  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
    Location: 41 locations

  • Treatment Study of Denintuzumab Mafodotin (SGN-CD19A) Plus RICE Versus RICE Alone for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    The purpose of this randomized, open-label study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of denintuzumab mafodotin plus RICE (rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide) when compared to RICE alone in the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) or Grade 3b follicular lymphoma. Eligible patients must also be candidates for autologous stem cell transplant. Patients will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive 3 cycles of study treatment with either denintuzumab mafodotin + RICE or RICE alone. The study will assess whether there is a difference between the 2 groups in the side effects that are reported and the number of patients who achieve complete remission at the end of their study treatment.
    Location: 15 locations

  • R-ICE and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients with First-Relapse / Primary Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of lenalidomide when given together with rituximab-ifosfamide-carboplatin-etoposide (R-ICE) and to see how well they work in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement and that has not responded to previous treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide, and lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving lenalidomide with R-ICE may be a better treatment for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 11 locations

  • A Study of Olaratumab Alone and in Combination With Standard Chemotherapies in Children With Cancer

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of different doses of olaratumab and to determine which dose should be used for future pediatric studies. The present study is open to children with advanced cancer or cancer that has spread to another part of the body. The study has two parts. In each part, a specific dose of olaratumab will be given for 21 days, followed by one of three standard chemotherapy regimens. Participants will only enroll in one part.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Irinotecan Hydrochloride, Temozolomide, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Ewing Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, ifosfamide, and etoposide phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, or by stopping them from dividing.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Risk Adapted Focal Proton Beam Radiation and / or Surgery in Participants with Low, Intermediate, and High Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma Receiving Standard or Intensified Chemotherapy

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation therapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed rhabdomyosarcoma that has spread to other parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, dactinomycin, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving combination chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

    The purpose of this research study is to evaluate a new drug Pembrolizumab in combination with chemotherapy, for Relapsed / Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma. The chemotherapy regimen is called “ICE” and includes three drugs: ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide. Pembrolizumab is currently Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for the treatment of some patients with melanoma, lung cancer and head and neck cancer, but has not yet been approved for the treatment of Relapsed / Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma. The ‘ICE’ regimen of chemotherapy is currently FDA approved for the treatment of Relapsed / Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma, but has not yet been investigated in combination with pembrolizumab for this disease. For patients who have a relapse of their Hodgkin’s lymphoma, retreatment with chemotherapy followed by a stem cell transplant is recommended. We know that obtaining a complete remission (not able to detect any disease on scans) is very important prior to proceeding to the stem cell transplant. Patients with negative scans have a lower chance of the disease coming back and a higher chance of achieving a long-term cure.
    Location: 5 locations

  • ILND Surgery Alone or after Chemotherapy with or without Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Penile Cancer

    This phase III randomized trial studies how well inguinal lymph node dissection (ILND) surgery alone or after chemotherapy with or without intensity-modulated radiation therapy works in treating patients with penile cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Surgery is used to remove the lymph nodes and may be able to cure the cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not known whether having surgery after chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy is better than having surgery alone.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Venetoclax and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Nivolumab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide as Second-Line Therapy in Treating Patients with Refractory or Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of nivolumab and to see how well it works when given together with ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide in treating patients with Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back and does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab, ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide may work better in treating patients with Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of brentuximab vedotin that can be combined with ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide in treating patients with Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or is not responding to treatment (refractory). Monoclonal antibody-drug conjugates, such as brentuximab vedotin, can block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving brentuximab vedotin together with an ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide chemotherapy regimen may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Stage I-II Nasal NK Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II clinical trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed state I-II nasal natural killer (NK) cell lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, etoposide, ifosfamide, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) with radiation therapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Sorafenib Tosylate, Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Surgery in Treating Patients with High-Risk Stage IIB-IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well sorafenib tosylate, combination chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery work in treating patients with high-risk stage IIB-IV soft tissue sarcoma. Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as epirubicin hydrochloride and ifosfamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving sorafenib tosylate, combination chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery may be an effective treatment for soft tissue sarcoma.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Carfilzomib, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Stage I-IV Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of carfilzomib when given together with rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide and to see how well it works in treating patients with stage I-IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has returned (relapsed) or that has not responded to treatment (refractory). Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide, also work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving carfilzomib with rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide may be a better treatment for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • High-Dose Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Recurrent Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have come back. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of tumor cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Also, monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can find cancer cells and either kill them or deliver cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Germ Cell Tumors

    Treatment options for relapsed or refractory germ cell tumors (GCT) patients are limited. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue (autologous stem cell transplant), when given sequentially, has shown that a subset of patients may be cured. The optimal high-dose chemotherapy regimen, however, is unknown. In this trial, we will use tandem autologous transplants with non-cross resistant conditioning regimens to treat patients with relapsed / refractory GCTs.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Accelerated or Standard BEP Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Intermediate or Poor-Risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well an accelerated schedule of bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy works compared to the standard schedule of BEP chemotherapy in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk germ cell tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BEP chemotherapy on a faster, or “accelerated” schedule may work better with fewer side effects in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumors.
    Location: Childrens Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Bortezomib in Treating Younger Patients with Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Stage II-IV T-Cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This randomized phase III trial compares how well combination chemotherapy works when given with or without bortezomib in treating patients with newly diagnosed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or stage II-IV T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. Bortezomib may help reduce the number of leukemia or lymphoma cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It may also help chemotherapy work better by making cancer cells more sensitive to the drugs. It is not yet known if giving standard chemotherapy with or without bortezomib is more effective in treating T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 188 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin or Crizotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin or crizotinib and combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Monoclonal antibody-drug conjugates, such as brentuximab vedotin, can block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Crizotinib and methotrexate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy is more effective than crizotinib and combination chemotherapy in treating anaplastic large cell lymphoma.
    Location: 145 locations

  • Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly Diagnosed Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed central nervous system germ cell tumors that have not spread to other parts of the brain, spinal canal, or body (localized). Drugs used as chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, etoposide, and ifosfamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 146 locations

  • Rolapitant Hydrochloride in Preventing Nausea / Vomiting in Patients with Sarcoma Receiving Chemotherapy

    This phase II trial studies how well rolapitant hydrochloride works in preventing nausea / vomiting in patients with sarcoma receiving chemotherapy. Antiemetic drugs, such as rolapitant hydrochloride, may help control or prevent nausea and vomiting in patients treated with chemotherapy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Fixed or Flexible Administration of Filgrastim in Treating Younger Patients With Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy and fixed administration of filgrastim to see how well it works compared to combination chemotherapy and flexible administration of filgrastim in treating younger patients with cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, ifosfamide, carboplatin, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim, may increase the number of immune cells found in bone marrow or peripheral blood and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy and fixed administration of filgrastim is more effective than combination chemotherapy and flexible administration of filgrastim in treating cancer.
    Location: Wayne State University / Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, Michigan