Clinical Trials Using Inotuzumab Ozogamicin

  • Resize font
  • Print
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Inotuzumab Ozogamicin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-7 of 7
  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory CD22 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin works in treating younger patients with CD22 positive B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotoxins, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, are antibodies linked to a toxic substance and may help find cancer cells that express CD22 and kill them without harming normal cells.
    Location: 56 locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Frontline Chemotherapy in Treating Young Adults with Newly Diagnosed B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of inotuzumab ozogamicin and how well it works when given with frontline chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with chemotherapy may work better in treating young adults with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with acute leukemia that has returned (relapsed) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotoxins, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, can find cancer cells that express cluster of differentiation (CD)22 and kill them without harming normal cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin together with combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia after Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin and how well it works in treating patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia after transplant. Monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Bosutinib and Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of bosutinib when given together with inotuzumab ozogamicin and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Bosutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotoxins, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, are antibodies linked to a toxic substance and may help find cancer cells that express CD22 and kill them without harming normal cells. Giving bosutinib together with inotuzumab ozogamicin may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin, Fludarabine Phosphate, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Lymphoid Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin when given together with fludarabine phosphate, bendamustine hydrochloride, and rituximab before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with lymphoid malignancies. Giving chemotherapy drugs, such as fludarabine phosphate and bendamustine hydrochloride, before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells or abnormal cell and helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin and rituximab, interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cell from a donor can make an immune system response against the body's normal cells. Giving fludarabine phosphate and bendamustine hydrochloride before the transplant together with anti-thymocyte globulin and tacrolimus may stop this from happening.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients with Previously Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin and to see how well it works when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating older patients with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin and blinatumomab, can block cancer growth by blocking the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin together with combination chemotherapy may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas