Clinical Trials Using Anti-Thymocyte Globulin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Anti-Thymocyte Globulin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 42
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  • Scleroderma Treatment with Autologous Transplant (STAT) Study

    This phase II trial studies how well giving cyclophosphamide and anti-thymocyte globulin together followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) and mycophenolate mofetil works in treating patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc). Stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored prior to treatment. To store the stem cells patients are given colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim (G-CSF) or chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide) to help stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. After storage, patients are then given high-dose chemotherapy, cyclophosphamide, and immunosuppression with anti-thymocyte globulin to suppress the immune system to prepare for the transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy and immunosuppression. After the stem cells have “engrafted” and have matured enough to support the immune system at approximately 2-3 months, patients are given a medication called mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or Myfortic. This medication is given to prevent worsening or reactivation of SSc and is referred to as maintenance therapy.
    Location: 12 locations

  • Optimizing Haploidentical Aplastic Anemia Transplantation (BMT CTN 1502)

    This study is a prospective, multicenter phase II study with patients receiving haploidentical transplantation for Severe Aplastic Anemia (SAA). The primary objective is to assess overall survival (OS) at 1 year post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).
    Location: 8 locations

  • Bone Marrow Transplantation vs Standard of Care in Patients With Severe Sickle Cell Disease (BMT CTN 1503)

    This is a clinical trial that will compare survival and sickle related outcomes in adolescents and young adults with severe sickle cell disease after bone marrow transplantation and standard of care. The primary outcome is 2-year overall survival.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant Followed by Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Severe Aplastic Anemia or Other Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    This phase II trial studies donor bone marrow transplant followed by chemotherapy in treating patients with severe aplastic anemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory), or other bone marrow failure syndromes. Infusing stem cells from a donor into a patient may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Currently, treatment to suppress the immune system is given before transplant to stop graft-versus-host disease from happening. Giving treatment to suppress the immune system after the transplant may work better in stopping graft-versus-host disease, and may help increase the number of donors for a patient by allowing people with stem cells that do not exactly match the patient to be donors. Giving treatment to suppress the immune system after the transplant may work better in stopping graft-versus-host disease, and may increase the amount of possible donors for a patient by better preventing graft-versus-host disease.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Treosulfan and Fludarabine Phosphate before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Nonmalignant Inherited Disorders

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well treosulfan and fludarabine phosphate with or without low dose radiation before donor stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with nonmalignant (noncancerous) diseases. Hematopoietic cell transplantation has been shown to be curative for many patients with nonmalignant (noncancerous) diseases such as primary immunodeficiency disorders, bone marrow failure syndromes, hemoglobinopathies, and inborn errors of metabolism (metabolic disorders). Powerful chemotherapy drugs and / or radiation are often used to condition the patient before infusion of the new healthy donor cells. The purpose of the conditioning therapy is to destroy the patient's abnormal bone marrow which doesn't work properly in order to make way for the new healthy donor cells which functions normally. Although effective in curing the patient's disease, many hematopoietic cell transplantation regimens use intensive chemotherapy and / or radiation which can be quite toxic, have significant side effects, and can potentially be life-threatening. Investigators are investigating whether a new conditioning regimen that uses less intensive drugs (treosulfan and fludarabine phosphate) with or without low dose radiation results in new blood-forming cells (engraftment) of the new donor cells without increased toxicities in patients with nonmalignant (noncancerous) diseases.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Neurologic Autoimmune Diseases

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan together with antithymocyte globulin before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant works in treating patients with autoimmune neurologic disease that did not respond to previous therapy. In autoimmune neurological diseases, the patient’s own immune system ‘attacks’ the nervous system which might include the brain / spinal cord and / or the peripheral nerves. Giving high-dose chemotherapy, including carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan, and antithymocyte globulin, before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant weakens the immune system and may help stop the immune system from ‘attacking’ a patient's nervous system. When the patient’s own (autologous) stem cells are infused into the patient they help the bone marrow make red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets so the blood counts can improve.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Very Low Dose Total Body Irradiation, Total Lymphoid Irradiation, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well very low dose total body irradiation, total lymphoid irradiation, and anti-thymocyte globulin work in treating patients undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Giving radiation therapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes, the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft versus host disease. Giving anti-thymocyte globulin may help stop this from happening.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Cytokine-Treated Veto Cells in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Following Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies how well cytokine-treated veto cells work in treating patients with hematologic malignancies following stem cell transplant. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Cytokine-treated veto cells may help the transplanted donor cells to develop and grow in recipients without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD - when transplanted donor tissue attacks the tissues of the recipient's body).
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Risk-Adjusted Combination Chemotherapy Alone in Treating Patients with Fanconi Anemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantion

    This phase II trial studies how well risk-adjusted combination chemotherapy alone works in treating patients with Fanconi anemia undergoing donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as busulfan, fludarabine and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. Dose of combination chemotherapy based on the patients age and bone marrow disease status, may decrease chemotherapy-related side effects while maximizing the effectiveness of disease control.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Reduced Intensity Chemotherapy and Total Body Irradiation before TCR-alpha / beta+ T-lymphocytes Donor Transplant in Treating Participants with High-Risk Myeloid Diseases

    This phase I trial studies how well reduced intensity chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before allogeneic TCR alpha / beta-positive T-lymphocyte-depleted peripheral blood stem cells (TCR-alpha / beta+ T-lymphocytes donor transplant) works in treating participants with high-risk myeloid diseases. Giving chemotherapy such as anti-thymocyte globulin and fludarabine phosphate, as well as total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the participant's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the participant they may help the participant's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Thiotepa, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Melphalan Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Blood Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well thiotepa, fludarabine phosphate, and melphalan hydrochloride work in treating patients with blood cancer who are undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as thiotepa, fludarabine phosphate, and melphalan hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Haploidentical Stem Cell Selection using Miltenyi CliniMACS CD34 Reagent System in Treating Participants with High-Risk Hematologic Disorders

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well haploidentical stem cells selected using Miltenyi CliniMACS CD34 reagent system works in treating participants with high-risk hematologic disorders. Stem cells selected using Miltenyi CliniMACS CD34 reagent system from a half-matched donor, may increase the number of cells given to participants during stem cell transplantation in combination with umbilical cord blood transplantation.
    Location: University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado

  • A Donor Stem Cell Transplant (Alpha / Beta T Cell and CD19+ B Cell Depleted Stem Cells) in Treating Patients with Primary Immunodeficiencies

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor stem cell transplant with alpha / beta T cell and CD19+ B cell depleted stem cells works in treating patients with primary immunodeficiencies. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can attack the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening. B cells sometimes can contribute to development of a virus that leads to enlarged lymph nodes. This is known as Epstein Bar virus associated lymphoproliferative disorder. Removing B cells before the transplant may stop this from happening. A donor stem cell transplant with alpha / beta T cell and CD19+ B cell depleted stem cells may reduce some of the complications of the transplant and decrease the time it takes for the new stem cells to establish a new immune system.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, Donor Bone Marrow Transplant, and Immunosuppressive Therapy in Treating Patients with Severe Aplastic Anemia

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy, total body irradiation, donor bone marrow transplant, and immunosuppressive therapy work in treating patients with severe aplastic anemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft-versus-host disease. Giving immunosuppressive therapy, such as tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil, after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving chemotherapy, total body irradiation, donor bone marrow transplant, and immunosuppressive therapy may work better in treating patients with severe aplastic anemia.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Blinatumomab and T Cell Depleted Donor Blood Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Hematologic Malignancy after a Previous Transplant

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab and T cell depleted donor blood cell transplant work in treating children and young adults with hematologic cancer that has not responded or has come back after a previous transplant. White blood cells from donors may be able to kill cancer cells in patients with hematologic cancer. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Removing the T cells from the donor cells before the transplant may stop this from happening. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving blinatumomab after a blood cell transplant may destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Personalized NK Cell Therapy after Chemotherapy and Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Leukemia, Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well personalized natural killer (NK) cell therapy works after chemotherapy and umbilical cord blood transplant in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, leukemia, lymphoma or multiple myeloma. This clinical trial will test cord blood (CB) selection for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C1 / x recipients based on HLA-killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) typing, and adoptive therapy with CB-derived NK cells for HLA-C2 / C2 patients. Natural killer cells may kill tumor cells that remain in the body after chemotherapy treatment and lessen the risk of graft versus host disease after cord blood transplant.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cyclophosphamide, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation with or without Anti-Thymocyte Globulin before Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of cyclophosphamide, fludarabine phosphate, and total-body irradiation with or without anti-thymocyte globulin before donor umbilical cord blood transplant and to see how well they work in treating patients with hematologic cancer. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before and after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Fludarabine, Cyclophosphamide, and Total-Body Irradiation before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Blood Diseases

    This phase II trial studies how well fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and total-body irradiation before donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with blood diseases. Giving chemotherapy, such as fludarabine and cyclophosphamide, and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Romidepsin in Conditioning and Maintenance in Patients with T-cell Leukemia or Lymphoma Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of romidepsin when given together with busulfan and fludarabine phosphate before donor stem cell transplant (SCT) (conditioning) and alone after SCT (maintenance) in treating patients with T-cell leukemia or lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as romidepsin, busulfan, and fludarabine phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving romidepsin together with busulfan and fludarabine phosphate may help prevent the patient's body from rejecting transplanted cells, and help kill any cancer cells that are in the body. Maintenance romidepsin may keep the cancer cells from coming back after the transplant.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Genetically Modified Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Zoledronic Acid in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed / Refractory Hematologic Malignancies or High Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of zoledronic acid given after genetically modified donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with hematologic malignancies or high risk tumors that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When healthy stem cells from a donor that have been genetically modified are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus after the transplant may stop this from happening. Giving zoledronic acid after the transplant may help strengthen the immune system and make the immune cells work better.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • CD8+ Memory T-Cells as Consolidative Therapy after Donor Non-myeloablative Hematopoietic Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well CD8+ memory T-cells work as a consolidative therapy following a donor non-myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplant in treating patients with leukemia or lymphoma. Giving total lymphoid irradiation and anti-thymocyte globulin before a donor hematopoietic cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening. Once the donated stem cells begin working, the patient's immune system may see the remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them. Giving an infusion of the donor's white blood cells, such as CD8+ memory T-cells, may boost this effect and may be an effective treatment to kill any cancer cells that may be left in the body.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Intensity Modulated Total Marrow Irradiation, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Melphalan in Treating Patients with Relapsed Hematologic Cancers Undergoing a Second or above Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of intensity modulated total marrow irradiation (IMTMI) when given together with fludarabine phosphate and melphalan in treating patients with cancers of the blood (hematologic) that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) undergoing a second or above donor stem cell transplant. IMTMI is a type of radiation therapy to the bone marrow that may be less toxic and may also reduce the chances of cancer to return. Giving fludarabine phosphate, melphalan, and IMTMI before a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Intra-osseous Donor Umbilical Cord Blood and Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Co-transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This clinical trial studies intra-osseous donor umbilical cord blood and mesenchymal stromal cell co-transplant in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a co-transplant of donor umbilical cord blood and mesenchymal stromal cells into the bone (intra-osseous) helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil at the time of transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • HSCT for Patients With Fanconi Anemia Using Risk-Adjusted Chemotherapy

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the use of lower doses of busulfan and the elimination of cyclosporine will further reduce transplant-related side effects for patients with Fanconi Anemia (FA). Patients will undergo a transplant utilizing mis-matched related or matched unrelated donors following a preparative regimen of busulfan, fludarabine, anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclophosphamide.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Organ-Sparing Marrow-Targeted Irradiation before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of organ-sparing marrow-targeted irradiation before stem cell transplant in treating patients with high-risk hematological malignancies. Total-body irradiation (TBI) is used to treat patients before an allogeneic stem cell transplant (where patients receive stem cells from another person) to eliminate leukemia cells. Newer radiation therapy can shape the radiation beam so that normal organs can be shielded, but the radiation will still reach other sites where leukemic cells exist. This type of radiation, called organ-sparing marrow-targeted irradiation (OSMI), may help more people benefit from the same dose of radiation as TBI without as many side effects.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio


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