Clinical Trials Using Carboplatin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Carboplatin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 176-200 of 238

  • Pembrolizumab, Bevacizumab, and Standard Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent, Persistent, or Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab, bevacizumab, and standard chemotherapy work in treating patients with cervical cancer that has come back (recurrent), remains despite treatment (persistent), or is stage IVB. The body's immune system helps fight infections and can also find and kill tumor cells. However, tumors make ways to shut down the immune system defenses. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, cisplatin, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab with bevacizumab and standard chemotherapy may work better in treating cervical cancer compared to bevacizumab and standard chemotherapy alone.
    Location: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine-Sylvester Cancer Center, Miami, Florida

  • Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Stage IIIB-IIIC Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy works in treating patients with stage IIIB-IIIC ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy procedures involved infusion of a heated chemotherapy drug at the time of the cytoreductive surgery. Heating cisplatin to several degrees above normal body temperature and infusing it into the area around the tumor may kill more tumor cells and be more tolerable to patients so that intravenous chemotherapy can be started within 42 hours after surgery.
    Location: University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, Kansas

  • Defactinib Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of defactinib hydrochloride in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel and how well they work in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back. Enzyme inhibitors, such as defactinib hydrochloride, may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving defactinib hydrochloride with carboplatin and paclitaxel may work better in treating patients with recurrent ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Olaparib, Cabazitaxel, Carboplatin, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well olaparib, cabazitaxel, carboplatin, and prednisone work in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cabazitaxel, carboplatin, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving olaparib, cabazitaxel, carboplatin, and prednisone may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Nivolumab, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin with or without Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with High Grade Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of nivolumab, paclitaxel, and carboplatin with or without ipilimumab in treating patients with high grade stage III-IV ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab, paclitaxel, and carboplatin with or without ipilimumab together may work better in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer compared to carboplatin and paclitaxel alone.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Pembrolizumab and Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Circulating Tumor Cells Positive Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the impact on progression-free survival (PFS) with the combination carboplatin - pembrolizumab in patients with CTC (circulating tumor cells) positive, triple-negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body and previously treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. Previous studies have indicated that recurrent breast cancers are more resistant to chemotherapy and maybe associated with a weak immune system. This study is investigating the use of an immune therapy drug, pembrolizumab, that has the ability to restore the capacity of controlling and killing cancer cells of an important component of your immune system called T-cells. Pembrolizumab has been found effective in other types of cancer and has already been approved by FDA for those indications, but the efficacy in breast cancer is still unknown. In this study, pembrolizumab will be combined with chemotherapy to increase the cancer cell killing. There is no control or placebo treatment in this study.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • PTC596 in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Unresectable Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of PTC596 in treating patients with newly diagnosed ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that cannot be removed by surgery who are receiving standard of care chemotherapy. PTC596 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Galunisertib in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed, Persistent, or Recurrent Uterine, Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Carcinosarcoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and how well paclitaxel, carboplatin, and galunisertib work in treating patients with uterine, ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal carcinosarcoma that is newly diagnosed, does not go to remission despite treatment (persistent), or has come back (recurrent). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Galunisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving paclitaxel, carboplatin, and galunisertib may work better in treating patients with uterine, ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal carcinosarcoma.
    Location: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Improving Quality of Life in Patients with Stage IIIC-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy works in improving quality of life in patients with stage IIIC-IV ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. In hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy, the chemotherapy is warmed before being used and may help the drugs get into the cancer cells better, minimize the toxicity of the drugs on normal cells, and help to kill any cancer cells left over after surgery.
    Location: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

  • Pirfenidone, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel or Pemetrexed Disodium in Treating Patients with Stage IIIB-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of pirfenidone and how well it works when given together with carboplatin and paclitaxel or pemetrexed disodium in treating patients with stage IIIB-IV non-small lung cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Pirfenidone may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, paclitaxel or pemetrexed disodium, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pirfenidone with carboplatin and paclitaxel or pemetrexed disodium may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Multimodality Therapy before and after Surgery in Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well multimodality therapy works before and after surgery in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving carboplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and durvalumab before surgery and using durvalumab with or without radiation therapy and cisplatin after surgery may kill more tumor cells in patients with head and neck cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Nivolumab with or without Ipilimumab or Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Stage I-IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab works when given alone and in combination with ipilimumab or chemotherapy in treating patients with previously untreated stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the tumor, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, docetaxel, and pemetrexed, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab with ipilimumab or chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Use of High Dose Radiation Followed by Chemotherapy and Radiation to Treat Locally Advanced NSCLC

    This is a single-arm, single-stage Phase II study designed to evaluate the 1-year PFS rate in subjects with locally-advanced NSCLC (stage II / III) and treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) followed by concurrent mediastinal chemoradiation with or without consolidation chemotherapy. A total of 60 subjects will be enrolled to this study over a 4 year accrual period.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Nivolumab, Nab-paclitaxel, and Carboplatin Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Response-Based Locoregional Therapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced HPV-Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab, nab-paclitaxel, and carboplatin induction chemotherapy followed by response-based locoregional therapy works in treating patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Locoregional therapy, such as surgery, radiation therapy, or chemoradiotherapy, may help decrease the side effects associated with treatment. Giving nivolumab, nab-paclitaxel, and carboplatin induction chemotherapy followed by response-based locoregional therapy may work better in treating patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • High Doses of Vitamin C with Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well high doses of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) work in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. High doses of intravenous vitamin C may change chemoradiation treatment effectiveness and / or tolerability. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Fractionated radiation therapy uses smaller doses of radiation therapy over time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Using high doses of vitamin C with chemotherapy and radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Palbociclib with Cisplatin or Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of palbociclib with cisplatin or carboplatin in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving palbociclib with cisplatin or carboplatin may help stop tumor growth in patients with advanced solid tumors.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Pembrolizumab, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin for the Treatment of Stage III-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab, paclitaxel, and carboplatin work in treating patients with stage III-IV ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab, paclitaxel, and carboplatin may work better in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer compared to paclitaxel and carboplatin without pembrolizumab.
    Location: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine-Sylvester Cancer Center, Miami, Florida

  • Safety and Pharmacokinetics (PK) of Escalating Doses of MTIG7192A as a Single Agent and in Combination With Atezolizumab With and Without Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced or Metastatic Tumors

    This first-in-human open-label, multicenter, dose-escalation and expansion study is designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and PK of MTIG7192A alone or in combination with atezolizumab administered with and without chemotherapy in participants with locally advanced, recurrent, or metastatic incurable tumors for whom standard therapy does not exist, has proven to be ineffective or intolerable, or is considered inappropriate, or for whom a clinical trial of an investigational agent is a recognized standard of care.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Retinoblastoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of carboplatin in treating patients with retinoblastoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose, or myeloablative, chemotherapy and stem cell transplant works in treating patients with neuroblastoma that is at high risk of spreading. Myeloablative chemotherapy uses high doses of chemotherapy to kill cells in the bone marrow, both cancer cells and healthy cells. Healthy stem cells from the patient that were collected before chemotherapy are then returned to the patient in a stem cell transplant to replace the cells that were killed by chemotherapy. Myeloablative chemotherapy and stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Docetaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Metastatic, Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Containing Inactivated Genes in the BRCA 1 / 2 Pathway

    This pilot phase II trial studies docetaxel and carboplatin in treating patients with castration resistant prostate cancer that has spread from the primary site (place where it started) to other places in the body (metastatic) and contains inactivated genes in the BRCA 1 / 2 pathway. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Women’s MoonShot: Neoadjuvant Treatment with PaCT for Patients with Locally Advanced TNBC

    This phase II trial studies how well panitumumab, carboplatin and paclitaxel work in treating patients with newly diagnosed triple negative breast cancer that is limited to the breast and possibly to the nearby lymph nodes. This treatment study is linked to NCI-2015-00191 protocol, which uses a baseline biopsy to determine the neoadjuvant therapy that matches the sub-type of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Immunotherapy with panitumumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panitumumab, carboplatin and paclitaxel before surgery may be an effective treatment for breast cancer by making the tumor smaller and reducing the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel with Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab or Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well carboplatin and paclitaxel given in combination with pertuzumab and trastuzumab or bevacizumab work in treating patients with breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab and bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. Giving carboplatin and paclitaxel together with pertuzumab and trastuzumab or bevacizumab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: UC Irvine Health / Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Orange, California

  • High-Dose Ascorbic Acid in Treating Patients with Stage IIIB-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose ascorbic acid works in treating patients with stage IIIB-IV non-small cell lung cancer. Ascorbic acid given at high-dose may cause tumor cells to die and may also increase the effectiveness when it's given together with chemotherapy.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride and carboplatin followed by surgery and paclitaxel work in treating patients with stage II-III breast cancer that does not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) / neu protein (triple negative). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, carboplatin, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride and carboplatin before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride and carboplatin followed by surgery and paclitaxel may be an effective treatment for breast cancer.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey