Clinical Trials Using Celecoxib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Celecoxib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-13 of 13
  • Efficacy & Safety of rAd-IFN Administered With Celecoxib & Gemcitabine in Patients With Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    This study will evaluate intrapleural administration of Adenovirus-Delivered Interferon Alpha-2b (rAd-IFN) in combination with Celecoxib and Gemcitabine in patients with histologically confirmed Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM) who have failed a minimum of 1 treatment regimen and a maximum of 2 treatment regimens, 1 of which must have been an anti-folate and platinum combination regimen. Eligible patients will be randomized 1:1 to either: 1. Treatment group: rAd-IFN + Celecoxib followed by Gemcitabine 2. Control group: Celecoxib followed by Gemcitabine Patients randomized to the treatment group will receive rAd-IFN administered into the pleural space via an Intrapleural catheter (IPC) or similar intrapleural device on study Day 1. The primary objective of this study is to compare the overall survival (OS) associated with rAd IFN, when administered with celecoxib and gemcitabine, versus that associated with celecoxib and gemcitabine alone for the treatment of patients with MPM
    Location: 11 locations

  • Sirolimus and Metronomic Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent and / or Refractory Solid or Central Nervous System Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well sirolimus and continuous or frequent treatment with low doses of chemotherapy work in treating younger patients with solid or central nervous system (CNS) tumors that have come back (recurrent) or have not responded to previous treatment (refractory). Biological therapies, such as sirolimus, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, celecoxib, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving sirolimus together with metronomic chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for solid and CNS tumors.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Celecoxib, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Participants with Bladder Cancer before Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and how well celecoxib, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and cisplatin work in treating participants with bladder cancer before surgery. Celecoxib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving celecoxib, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and cisplatin before surgery may work better in treating participants with bladder cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Antiangiogenic Therapy for Children With Recurrent Medulloblastoma, Ependymoma and ATRT

    Patients with relapsed medulloblastoma, ependymoma and ATRT have a very poor prognosis whether treated with conventional chemotherapy, high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue, irradiation or combinations of these modalities. Antiangiogenetic therapy has emerged as new treatment option in solid malignancies. The frequent, metronomic schedule targets both proliferating tumor cells and endothelial cells, and minimizes toxicity. In this study the investigators will evaluate the use of biweekly intravenous bevacizumab in combination with five oral drugs (thalidomide, celecoxib, fenofibrate, and alternating cycles of daily low-dose oral etoposide and cyclophosphamide), augmented with alternating courses of intrathecal etoposide and cytarabine. The aim of the study is to extend therapy options for children with recurrent or progressive medulloblastoma, ependymoma and ATRT, for whom no known curative therapy exists, by prolonging survival while maintaining good quality of life. The primary objective of the MEMMAT trial is to evaluate the activity of this multidrug antiangiogenic approach in these heavily pretreated children and young adults. Additionally, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), as well as feasibility and toxicity will be examined.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Celecoxib through Surgery and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well celecoxib works through surgery and radiation therapy in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Celecoxib is Food and Drug Administration approved to treat arthritis, acute pain, and painful menstrual periods. Adding celecoxib to standard of care treatment may help to decrease the amount of time between surgery and radiation therapy.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Chemokine Modulation Therapy and Standard Chemotherapy before Surgery for the Treatment of Early Stage Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of chemokine modulation therapy when given together with standard chemotherapy given before surgery in treating patients with early stage triple negative breast cancer. Chemokines are molecules that are involved in a variety of immune and inflammatory responses. Chemokine modulation therapy, including celecoxib, recombinant interferon alfa-2b, and rintatolimod, may modify the immune response and tumor-related processes and may stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemokine modulation therapy together with standard chemotherapy may work better than giving either therapy alone in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Serial Measurements of Molecular and Architectural Responses to Therapy (SMMART) PRIME Trial

    This phase Ib trial determines if samples from a patient’s cancer can be tested to find combinations of drugs that provide clinical benefit for the kind of cancer the patient has. This study is also being done to understand why cancer drugs can stop working and how different cancers in different people respond to different types of therapy.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • A Study Evaluating Safety and Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Navitoclax Monotherapy and in Combination With Ruxolitinib in Participants With Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    There are 4 parts to this study for which the primary objectives are to evaluate safety and tolerability, including dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), and pharmacokinetics (PK) of navitoclax when administered alone (Part 1) or when administered in combination with ruxolitinib (Part 2). In Part 2, participants must have been receiving a stable dose of ruxolitinib therapy for at least 12 weeks prior to study enrollment. In Part 3, all eligible participants will receive navitoclax, with the primary objective being to evaluate potential navitoclax effect on QTc prolongation. In Part 4, effect of navitoclax is evaluated on the PK, safety, and tolerability of a single dose of celecoxib in participants with myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML).
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Sirolimus and Metronomic Chemotherapy for the Treatment of High-Risk Solid Tumors in Children, AflacST1903 Study

    This phase II trial studies how well sirolimus together with repetitive, low doses of chemotherapy (metronomic chemotherapy) works in treating children with high-risk solid tumors. Sirolimus is used to decrease the body's immune response. Chemotherapy drugs, such as etoposide and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Celecoxib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving sirolimus together with chemotherapy may help stop tumor growth by preventing blood from getting to the tumor and ultimately prevent the tumor from coming back.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Dendritic Cell Vaccines against Her2 / Her3, Cytokine Modulation Regimen, and Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Brain Metastasis from Triple Negative Breast Cancer or HER2+ Breast Cancer

    This phase IIa trial studies how well dendritic cell vaccines against Her2 / Her3, cytokine modulation (CKM) regimen, and pembrolizumab work for the treatment of triple negative breast cancer or HER2+ breast cancer that has spread to the brain (brain metastasis). Dendritic cell vaccines work by boosting the immune system (a system in the body that protect against infection) to recognize and destroy the cancer cells. CKM regimen, consisting of rintatolimod, interferon alpha-2b and celecoxib, attempt to direct the immune cells to the cancer cells and maximize the effectiveness of pembrolizumab. Pembrolizumab is an “immune checkpoint inhibitor” which is designed to either “unleash” or “enhance” the cancer immune responses that already exist by either blocking inhibitory molecules” or by activating stimulatory molecules. Giving dendritic cell vaccines, CKM regimen, and pembrolizumab may shrink the cancer.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Polarized Dendritic Cell (aDC1) Vaccine, Interferon Alpha-2, Rintalolimid, and Celecoxib for the Treatment of HLA-A2+ Refractory Melanoma

    This phase II trial studies how well polarized dendritic cell (aDC1) vaccine, interferon alpha-2, rintatolimod, and celecoxib work together in treating patients with HLA-A2 positive (+) melanoma that has not responded to previous treatment (refractory). The aDC1 vaccine contains white blood cells (dendritic cells or DCs) that stimulates the immune system. Interferon alpha-2 can improve the body’s natural response to infections and other diseases. It can also interfere with the division of cancer cells and slow tumor growth. Rintalolimid may stimulate the immune system. Celecoxib is a drug that reduces pain. This study is being done to find out if aDC1 vaccine, interferon alpha-2, rintatolimod, and celecoxib can prevent the growth and / or progression of melanoma.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Adjuvant Tumor Lysate Vaccine and Iscomatrix With or Without Metronomic Oral Cyclophosphamide and Celecoxib in Patients With Malignancies Involving Lungs, Esophagus, Pleura, or Mediastinum

    Background: During recent years, cancer-testis (CT) antigens (CTA), particularly those encoded by genes on the X chromosome (CT-X genes), have emerged as attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. Whereas malignancies of diverse histologies express a variety of CTAs, immune responses to these proteins appear uncommon in cancer patients, possibly due to low-level, heterogeneous antigen expression, as well as immunosuppressive regulatory T cells present within tumor sites and systemic circulation of these individuals. Conceivably, vaccination of cancer patients with tumor cells expressing high levels of CTAs in combination with regimens that deplete or inhibit T regulatory cells will induce broad immunity to these antigens. In order to examine this issue, patients with primary lung and esophageal cancers, pleural mesotheliomas, thoracic sarcomas, thymic neoplasms and mediastinal germ cell tumors, as well as sarcomas, melanomas, germ cell tumors, or epithelial malignancies metastatic to lungs, pleura or mediastinum with no evidence of disease (NED) or minimal residual disease (MRD) following standard multidisciplinary therapy will be vaccinated with H1299 tumor cell lysates with Iscomatrix adjuvant. Vaccines will be administered with or without metronomic oral cyclophosphamide (50 mg PO BID x 7d q 14d), and celecoxib (400 mg PO BID). Serologic responses to a variety of recombinant CTAs as well as immunologic responses to autologous tumor or epigenetically modified autologous EBVtransformed lymphocytes will be assessed before and after a six month vaccination period. Primary Objectives: 1. To assess the frequency of immunologic responses to CTAs in patients with thoracic malignancies following vaccinations with H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix(TM) vaccines alone in comparison to patients with thoracic malignancies following vaccinations with H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix vaccines in combination with metronomic cyclophosphamide and celecoxib. Secondary Objectives: 1. To examine if oral metronomic cyclophosphamide and celecoxib therapy diminishes the number and percentage of T regulatory cells and diminishes activity of these cells in patients with thoracic malignancies are at risk of recurrence. 2. To examine if H1299 cell lysate / Iscomatrix(TM) vaccination enhances immunologic response to autologous tumor or epigenetically modified autologous EBV-transformed lymphocytes (B cells). Eligibility: - Patients with histologically or cytologically proven small cell or non-small cell lung cancer (SCLC;NSCLC), esophageal cancer (EsC), malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) , thymic or mediastinal germ cell tumors, thoracic sarcomas, or melanomas, sarcomas, or epithelial malignancies metastatic to lungs, pleura or mediastinum who have no clinical evidence of active disease (NED), or minimal residual disease (MRD) not readily accessible by non-invasive biopsy or resection / radiation following standard therapy completed within the past 26 weeks. - Patients must be 18 years or older with an ECOG performance status of 0 2. - Patients must have adequate bone marrow, kidney, liver, lung and cardiac function. - Patients may not be on systemic immunosuppressive medications at time vaccinations commence. Design: - Following recovery from surgery, chemotherapy, or chemo / XRT, patients with NED or MRD will be vaccinated via IM injection with H1299 cell lysates and Iscomatrix(TM) adjuvant monthly for 6 months. - Vaccines will be administered with or without with metronomic oral cyclophosphamide and celecoxib. - Systemic toxicities and immunologic response to therapy will be recorded. Pre and post vaccination serologic and cell mediated responses to a standard panel of CT antigens as well as autologous tumor cells (if available) and EBV-transformed lymphocytes will be assessed before and after vaccination. - Numbers / percentages and function of T regulatory cells in peripheral blood will be assessed before, during, and after vaccinations. - Patients will be followed in the clinic with routine staging scans until disease recurrence. - The trial will randomize 28 evaluable patients per arm to either receive vaccine alone or vaccine plus chemotherapy in order to have 80% power to determine if the frequency of immune responses on the combination arm exceeds that of the vaccine alone arm, if the expected frequencies of immune responses on the two arms
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • A Non-opioid Pain Control Regimen for Pain Management in Patients Undergoing Head and Neck Cancer Surgery

    This phase III trial studies how well a non-opioid pain control regimen administered before and during surgery works for pain management in patients undergoing head and neck cancer surgery. Opioids are a class of drugs that work in the brain to produce a variety of effects, including pain relief. In addition to controlling pain, opioids can make some people feel "high" and can be addictive. Acetaminophen, celecoxib, gabapentin, ketamine and lidocaine are non-opioid medications that when given before and during surgery, may improve post-surgery pain and / or decrease opioid consumption, which may relieve opioid related side effects and adverse symptoms, improve quality of life, and decrease the risk of chronic pain.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio