Clinical Trials Using Decitabine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Decitabine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-36 of 36

  • Cytarabine, Idarubicin and Liposome-encapsulated Daunorubicin-Cytarabine, or Venetoclax, Azacitidine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well cytarabine and idarubicin or venetoclax, azacitidine and decitabine work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cytarabine, idarubicin, liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine and venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Azacitidine and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving patients cytarabine, idarubicin, liposome-encapsulated daunorubicin-cytarabine, venetoclax, azacitidine or decitabine may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia based on clinicogenetic risk stratification.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska

  • Palbociclib and Sorafenib, Decitabine, Dexamethasone or Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of palbociclib when given alone and in combination with sorafenib, decitabine, dexamethasone or venetoclax in treating patients with leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or that does not respond to previous treatment (refractory). Palbociclib, sorafenib, decitabine, and venetoclax may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving palbociclib alone and in combination with sorafenib, decitabine, dexamethasone or venetoclax may work better in treating patients with recurrent or refractory leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • STAT Inhibitor OPB-111077, Decitabine, and Venetoclax in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia That Is Refractory, Relapsed, or Newly Diagnosed and Ineligible for Intensive Chemotherapy

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of STAT inhibitor OPB-111077 when given together with decitabine and venetoclax in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that does not respond to treatment (refractory), has come back (relapsed), or is newly diagnosed and ineligible for intensive chemotherapy. STAT inhibitor OPB-111077 and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving STAT inhibitor OPB-111077, decitabine, and venetoclax may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia compared to decitabine alone.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome before Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This randomized clinical trial studies different chemotherapies in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome before donor stem cell transplant. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells, and may prevent the myelodysplastic syndrome from coming back after the transplant. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Patients with Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies how well cladribine, cytarabine, and decitabine work in treating patients with untreated acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, cytarabine, and decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Study of Sapacitabine in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    This is a combination study to evaluate sapacitabine administered in alternating cycles with decitabine in previously untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) or concomitantly with venetoclax in previously treated AML or MDS
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Cytarabine, Filgrastim-sndz, Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin, and Idarubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, filgrastim-sndz, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and idarubicin hydrochloride work in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and idarubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called gemtuzumab, linked to a antitumor drug, called calicheamicin. Gemtuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it attaches to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as CD33 receptors, and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim-sndz, may increase the number of immune cells found in bone marrow or peripheral blood and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, filgrastim-sndz, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and idarubicin hydrochloride may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Efficacy Study of Inecalcitol With Decitabine in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Unfit for Standard Chemotherapy

    Evaluate the effect of the addition of inecalcitol to decitabine treatment on overall survival in previously untreated AML patients aged 65 years or more who are randomly assigned to receive decitabine with or without inecalcitol.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Testing Nivolumab in Combination with Decitabine and Venetoclax in Patients with Newly Diagnosed TP53 Gene Mutated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This trial studies the side effects of nivolumab in combination with decitabine and venetoclax and to see how well they work in treating patients with TP53-mutated acute myeloid leukemia. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine and venetoclax, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This study is being done to find out whether giving nivolumab, decitabine, and venetoclax is better or worse than the usual approach for TP53-mutated acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Azacitidine and Decitabine for the Treatment of Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Other Related Cancers

    This early phase I trial studies the effect of azacitidine and decitabine in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, also called bone marrow failure, or a related cancer. The bone marrow is the place or factory in the body where components of blood such as red cells, platelets and white cells are made. In bone marrow failure, the ability of the bone marrow to make these cells is decreased. In myelodysplastic syndrome, this decreased bone marrow function is believed to result from abnormalities that prevent the normal maturation process by which bone marrow cells develop into red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Although the abnormal bone marrow cells in myelodysplastic syndrome are not good at maturing to make the components of the blood needed, they occupy space in the bone marrow and prevent the function of remaining normal bone marrow cells. Azacitidine and decitabine belong to a family of drugs called antimetabolites, and work by helping the bone marrow to produce normal blood cells and by killing abnormal cells in the bone marrow. Furthermore, giving alternating low doses of azacitidine and decitabine may help overcome the known mechanisms of resistance to the administration of azacitidine and decitabine as single agents.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Pevonedistat and Decitabine in Treating Patients with High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pevonedistat when given together with decitabine in treating patients with high risk acute myeloid leukemia. Pevonedistat and decitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes need for cell growth.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California