Clinical Trials Using Etoposide

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Etoposide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 119

  • Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Neurologic Autoimmune Diseases

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan together with antithymocyte globulin before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant works in treating patients with autoimmune neurologic disease that did not respond to previous therapy. In autoimmune neurological diseases, the patient’s own immune system ‘attacks’ the nervous system which might include the brain / spinal cord and / or the peripheral nerves. Giving high-dose chemotherapy, including carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan, and antithymocyte globulin, before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant weakens the immune system and may help stop the immune system from ‘attacking’ a patient's nervous system. When the patient’s own (autologous) stem cells are infused into the patient they help the bone marrow make red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets so the blood counts can improve.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Prexasertib, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Etoposide, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of prexasertib when given together with mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high risk myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Prexasertib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving prexasertib, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high risk myelodysplastic syndrome compared to mitoxantrone hydrochloride, etoposide, and cytarabine.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Chemoimmunotherapy and Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant for NK T-cell Leukemia / Lymphoma

    Patients are in 2 cohorts: Cohort 1: dexamethasone, methotrexate, ifosfamide, pegaspargase, and etoposide (modified SMILE) chemotherapy regimen alone and pembrolizumab in children, adolescents, and young adults with advanced stage NK lymphoma and leukemia Cohort 2: combining pralatrexate (PRX) (Cycles 1, 2, 4, 6) and brentuximab vedotin (BV) (Cycles 3, 5) to cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone in children, adolescent, and young adults with advanced peripheral T-cell lymphoma (non-anaplastic large cell lymphoma or non-NK lymphoma / leukemia) . Both groups proceed to allogeneic stem cell transplant with disease response.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Oral Azacitidine and Salvage Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects, best dose of oral azacitidine and how well it works when given together with salvage chemotherapy in treating patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving oral azacitidine and salvage chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Ascorbic Acid and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well ascorbic acid and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to therapy (refractory). Ascorbic acid may make cancer cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ascorbic acid and combination chemotherapy may work better at treating lymphoma.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Venetoclax and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Venetoclax may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cyclophosphamide or Thalidomide after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Solid Tumors

    This early phase I pilot clinical trial studies cyclophosphamide or thalidomide following high dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with solid tumors. Drugs such as cyclophosphamide and thalidomide suppress the growth of new blood vessels to tumors. Blocking blood flow to tumors after receiving high dose chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant may prevent the tumors from coming back or continuing to grow.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Antiangiogenic Therapy for Children With Recurrent Medulloblastoma, Ependymoma and ATRT

    Patients with relapsed medulloblastoma, ependymoma and ATRT have a very poor prognosis whether treated with conventional chemotherapy, high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue, irradiation or combinations of these modalities. Antiangiogenetic therapy has emerged as new treatment option in solid malignancies. The frequent, metronomic schedule targets both proliferating tumor cells and endothelial cells, and minimizes toxicity. In this study the investigators will evaluate the use of biweekly intravenous bevacizumab in combination with five oral drugs (thalidomide, celecoxib, fenofibrate, and alternating cycles of daily low-dose oral etoposide and cyclophosphamide), augmented with alternating courses of intrathecal etoposide and cytarabine. The aim of the study is to extend therapy options for children with recurrent or progressive medulloblastoma, ependymoma and ATRT, for whom no known curative therapy exists, by prolonging survival while maintaining good quality of life. The primary objective of the MEMMAT trial is to evaluate the activity of this multidrug antiangiogenic approach in these heavily pretreated children and young adults. Additionally, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), as well as feasibility and toxicity will be examined.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Virotherapy and Natural History Study of KHSV-Associated Multricentric Castleman s Disease With Correlates of Disease Activity

    This study will gain information about a rare disorder called KSHV-associated multicentric Castleman s disease (MCD). KSHV, a virus, causes several kinds of cancer, including some forms of MCD. KSHV stands for the Kaposi s sarcoma herpes virus, also called human herpes virus-8, or HHV-8. Researchers want to understand the biology of KSHV-MCD to identify how this disease causes illness and to find ways to treat it. There is no standard therapy effective for all cases of KSHV-MCD. The disease is often fatal, and about half the people who have it die within 2 years of diagnosis. Participants ages 18 and older may be eligible for this study. Participation entails more drawing of blood and having repeated tumor biopsies than if patients received treatment in a non-research setting. Researchers would like to learn more about the relationship of KSHV and Castleman s disease symptoms, and they want to obtain at least three biopsies in this study. There are some side effects of experimental therapy that participants may take for KSHV-MCD. Zidovudine, or Retrovir , is used at a high dose. It is given orally or through a vein, four times daily, for 7 days or longer. Zidovudine can cause nausea, vomiting, decreased bone marrow function, and decreased blood counts. Combined with valganciclovir, or Valcyte , it is likely to be more toxic to bone marrow. Valganciclovir can cause problems with bone marrow function, leading to low blood counts, sterility, and defects in a fetus. Combined with zidovudine, valganciclovir may cause more toxicity to the bone marrow. It is given twice daily for 7 days or longer. Bortezomib, or Velcade , is given for a few seconds by a rapid push through a needle into the vein. It is given twice weekly for four doses and then stopped for 1 week. Bortezomib can sometimes cause low blood pressure; it also can cause gastrointestinal problems and a low blood platelet count. Rituximab and liposomal doxorubicin are drugs given by a catheter into a vein. Interferon-alpha is given by injection into the skin. Those drugs are not experimental, but their use in Castleman s disease is experimental. Some participants may be treated with a combination of chemotherapy followed by interferon-alpha. Interferon-alpha is infected into the skin by a needle. The natural form of interferon is produced by the body and helps to control viral infections. KSHV decreases the effect of the body s interferon, and the researchers want to see if giving higher doses of interferon will help to control KSHV infection. A positron emission tomography (PET) scan, for research purposes only, may be done up to three times a year. A radioactive sugar molecule called fluorodeoxyglucose, or FDG, is used. It is believed that activated lymphocytes that may be found in participants disease might use more FDG because these cells burn more glucose fuel. This study may or may not have a direct benefit for participants. However, detailed assessments made throughout the study may provide information to help the doctors treat KSHV-MCD better.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Olaparib and Durvalumab with Carboplatin, Etoposide, and / or Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer, PRIO Trial

    This phase I / II trials investigates the side effects of olaparib and durvalumab and how well it works in combination with carboplatin, etoposide, and / or radiation therapy in treating patients with extensive stage-small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC) who have not received treatment for their disease. PARPs are proteins that help repair DNA mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, can keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can't repair themselves, and they may stop growing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy sources to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving olaparib and durvalumab together with carboplatin, etoposide, and / or radiation therapy may help treat patients with ES-SCLC.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Testing the Addition of an Anti-cancer Drug, Entinostat, to the Usual Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy Treatment (Atezolizumab, Carboplatin and Etoposide) for Previously Untreated Aggressive Lung Cancer that Has Spread

    This phase I trial seeks to find out the best dose, possible benefits and / or side effects of entinostat in combination with atezolizumab, carboplatin and etoposide for the treatment of previously untreated aggressive lung cancer that has spread (extensive-stage small cell lung cancer). Entinostat and etoposide may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Carboplatin is a chemotherapy drug that attaches to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and may kill tumor cells. Giving entinostat in combination with atezolizumab, carboplatin and etoposide may work better than atezolizumab, carboplatin and etoposide alone.
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • Placebo-controlled, Study of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy With Pembrolizumab Followed by Pembrolizumab and Olaparib in Newly Diagnosed Treatment-Naïve Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer (LS-SCLC) (MK 7339-013 / KEYLYNK-013)

    The purpose of this study is to compare overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors Version 1.1 (RECIST 1.1) as assessed by blinded independent central review (BICR). Hypothesis (H1): Concurrent chemoradiation therapy with pembrolizumab followed by pembrolizumab plus olaparib is superior to concurrent chemoradiation therapy alone with respect to PFS per RECIST 1.1 by BICR. Hypothesis (H2): Concurrent chemoradiation therapy with pembrolizumab followed by pembrolizumab is superior to concurrent chemoradiation therapy alone with respect to PFS per RECIST 1.1 by BICR. Hypothesis (H3): Concurrent chemoradiation therapy with pembrolizumab followed by pembrolizumab plus olaparib is superior to concurrent chemoradiation therapy alone with respect to OS. Hypothesis (H4): Concurrent chemoradiation therapy with pembrolizumab followed by pembrolizumab is superior to concurrent chemoradiation therapy alone with respect to OS.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Response-Adapted Ruxolitinib-Containing Regimen for the Treatment of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the best dose and effect of ruxolitinib in combination with dexamethasone and etoposide in treating patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Ruxolitinib may reduce the immune system inflammation that occurs with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and may be more effective and better tolerated compared to other hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis therapies.
    Location: Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant after Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory High-Risk Solid Tumors in Pediatric and Adolescent-Young Adults

    This phase II trial investigates side effects and how well donor stem cell transplant after chemotherapy works in treating pediatric and adolescent-young adults with high-risk solid tumor that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Chemotherapy drugs, such as fludarabine, thiotepa, etoposide, melphalan, and rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps kill cancer cells in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into a patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make more healthy cells and platelets and may help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Chemotherapy and Donor Stem Transplant for the Treatment of Patients with High Grade Brain Cancer

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects and effectiveness of chemotherapy followed by a donor (allogeneic) stem cell transplant when given to patients with high grade brain cancer. Chemotherapy drugs, such as fludarabine, thiotepa, etoposide, melphalan, and rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps kill cancer cells in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into a patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make more healthy cells and platelets and may help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Modified Chemotherapy Regimen and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Pediatric Patients

    This phase I trial studies how well a modified chemotherapy regimen with gemtuzumab ozogamicin works for the treatment of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia in pediatric patients. The current standard of care to treat most pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia is 5 cycles of chemotherapy. Adjusting treatment with a 4-cycle treatment regimen may provide the same treatment results and decrease the amount of side effects experienced during treatment. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, gemtuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called calicheamicin. Gemtuzumab attaches to CD33 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Giving gemtuzumab ozogamicin with the 4-cycle treatment regimen may also reduce the chances of acute myeloid leukemia coming back after initial treatment.
    Location: Children's Healthcare of Atlanta - Egleston, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Polatuzumab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Untreated Aggressive Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of polatuzumab vedotin when given with combination chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with untreated large B-cell lymphoma that grows and spreads quickly and has severe symptoms (aggressive). Polatuzumab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, polatuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Polatuzumab attaches to CD79B positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy such as etoposide, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as prednisone, lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving polatuzumab vedotin in addition to etoposide, prednisone, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab may help treat patients with aggressive large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Acalabrutinib and Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin and Etoposide for the Treatment of Patients with Relapsed / Refractory Non-Germinal Center Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma, Transformed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia / / Small Lymphocytic Leukemia or Transformed Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    This phase II trial investigates the use of acalabrutinib and how well it works in combination with rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide, in treating patients with non-germinal center diffuse large B cell lymphoma, transformed chronic lymphocytic leukemia / small lymphocytic leukemia or transformed marginal zone lymphoma that has come back (after a period of improvement) (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Acalabrutinib is a type of drug that blocks proteins inside cells that help cells live and grow. It is possible that acalabrutinib may kill the cancer cells or stop them from growing. The specific protein blocked by acalabrutinib is believed to help blood cancer cells live and grow. Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody, which is a type of protein made in the laboratory that can bind to substances in the body that can kill cancer cells. Ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide are types of a drug that causes deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, kills cancer cells and stops them from growing. Giving acalabrutinib in combination with rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide may improve durable responses in patients.
    Location: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine-Sylvester Cancer Center, Miami, Florida

  • A Study of Daratumumab and Dose-Adjusted EPOCH in Plasmablastic Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies how well daratumumab in combination with dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DA-EPOCH) works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage I-IV plasmablastic lymphoma. Plasmablastic lymphoma cells have high levels of a protein called CD38. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that specifically targets CD38 expressing cells, and may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer and interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving daratumumab may enhance the effectiveness of a standard chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH) in patients with plasmablastic lymphoma.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Preliminary Efficacy Trial of BNT411

    This first-in-human (FIH) trial aims to establish a safe dose of BNT411 as a monotherapy and in combination with atezolizumab, carboplatin and etoposide. BNT411 is a toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonist which is expected to mount broad innate and adaptive immune reactions, especially in combination with cytotoxic therapies and immune checkpoint inhibitors.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Pediatric Trial of Indoximod With Chemotherapy and Radiation for Relapsed Brain Tumors or Newly Diagnosed DIPG

    Indoximod was developed to inhibit the IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase) enzymatic pathway, which is important in the natural regulation of immune responses. This potent immune suppressive mechanism has been implicated in regulating immune responses in settings as diverse as infection, tissue / organ transplant, autoimmunity, and cancer. By inhibiting the IDO pathway, we hypothesize that indoximod will improve antitumor immune responses and thereby slow the growth of tumors. The central clinical hypothesis for the GCC1949 study is that inhibiting the pivotal IDO pathway by adding indoximod immunotherapy during chemotherapy and / or radiation is a potent approach for breaking immune tolerance to pediatric tumors that will improve outcomes, relative to standard therapy alone. This is an NCI-funded (R01 CA229646, MPI: Johnson and Munn) open-label phase 2 trial using indoximod-based combination chemo-radio-immunotherapy for treatment of patients age 3 to 21 years who have progressive brain cancer (glioblastoma, medulloblastoma, or ependymoma), or newly-diagnosed diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). Statistical analysis will stratify patients based on whether their treatment plan includes up-front radiation (or proton) therapy in combination with indoximod. Central review of tissue diagnosis from prior surgery is required, except non-biopsied DIPG. This study will use the "immune-adapted Response Assessment for Neuro-Oncology" (iRANO) criteria for measurement of outcomes. Planned enrollment is up to 140 patients.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Acalabrutinib With DA-EPOCH-R or R-CHOP for People With Untreated Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    Background: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Most people with this cancer can be cured. But those who are not cured have a poor prognosis. Researchers want to add another drug to standard treatment see if it can improve the cure rate. Objective: To see if the drug acalabrutinib given with rituximab and standard combination chemotherapy can improve the cure rate of aggressive B-cell lymphomas such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with an aggressive B-cell lymphomas that have not been treated Design: Participants will be screened with: Blood and urine tests Physical exam Medical history Tumor biopsy Bone marrow biopsy: A needle will remove marrow from the participant s hipbone. Lumbar puncture: If necessary, a needle will remove fluid from the participant s spinal canal. Imaging scans Participants will take the study drug for up to 14 days. It is a pill taken 2 times a day. Then they will have more scans. They will get rituximab and chemotherapy. They may get these drugs through a needle in an arm vein. Or they may them through a tube placed in a vein in their chest or in their neck. They might also keep taking the study drug. Each treatment cycle lasts 21 days. They will have up to 6 cycles. Participants may have 4 doses of another drug injected into their spinal fluid. Participants will have repeats of the screening tests throughout the study. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after their last treatment, then every 3 months for 2 years, then every 6 months for 3 years, and then yearly. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin in combination with chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells than with chemotherapy alone in treating patients with recurrent or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Temozolomide, Etoposide, Doxil, Dexamethasone, Ibrutinib, and Rituximab (TEDDI-R) in Aggressive B-cell Lymphomas With Secondary Involvement of the Central Nervous System (CNS)

    Background: Secondary central nervous system lymphoma (sCNSL) is cancer that has spread to the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat it do not cross the blood-brain barrier. This makes it hard to treat. Researchers hope that a new combination of drugs may be able to help. Objective: To find a better way to treat sCNSL. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with sCNSL Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Eye exam - Tissue or tumor biopsy - Collection of cerebrospinal fluid - CT, PET, and MRI scans: Participants will like in a machine that takes pictures of the body. - Bone marrow aspirations or biopsies: A needle will be inserted into the participant s hipbone. The needle will remove a small amount of marrow. Participants will take the study drugs in 21-day cycles. They will take some drugs by mouth. They will take others through a catheter: A small tube will be inserted into a vein in the arm, neck, or chest. They may have drugs given through a catheter placed through the brain or injected into the spinal canal. Participants will have regular visits during the study. These will include repeats of the screening test. They may also provide a saliva sample or have a cheek swab. Participants will have up to 4 treatment cycles. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after their last treatment dose. Then they will have visits every 3-6 months for 3 years and then yearly....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Durvalumab and Tremelimumab in Combination with Platinum-based Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Patients with Untreated Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well durvalumab and tremelimumab given in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy work in treating patients with untreated extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. Extensive-stage small cell lung cancer is associated with aggressive biology and poor outcomes. Each study drug, durvalumab and tremelimumab, targets a different signal that may be stopping the body's immune system from killing the cancer. Durvalumab targets a signal on tumor cells and tremelimumab targets a signal on immune cells. It is hoped that by blocking these signals, the immune cells will once again be able to prevent or slow down cancer growth. Chemotherapy drugs such as carboplatin and etoposide, work in work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The information learned from the combination of immune boosting drugs may be identified as not excessively toxic and may be studied further to determine the benefit of using these as a therapy for extensive-stage small cell lung cancer.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska