Clinical Trials Using Everolimus

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Everolimus. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 38
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  • Study of Lenvatinib in Combination With Everolimus in Recurrent and Refractory Pediatric Solid Tumors, Including Central Nervous System Tumors

    Phase 1 of this study, utilizing a rolling 6 design, will be conducted to determine a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D), and to describe the toxicities of lenvatinib administered in combination with everolimus once daily to pediatric participants with recurrent / refractory solid tumors. Phase 2, utilizing Simon's optimal 2-stage design, will be conducted to estimate the antitumor activity of lenvatinib in combination with everolimus in pediatric participants with selected recurrent / refractory solid tumors including Ewing sarcoma / peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (pPNET), rhabdomyosarcoma, and high grade glioma (HGG) using objective response rate (ORR) at Week 16 as the outcome measure.
    Location: 14 locations

  • A Study of Ruxolitinib vs Best Available Therapy (BAT) in Patients With Steroid-refractory Chronic Graft vs. Host Disease (GvHD) After Bone Marrow Transplantation (REACH3)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of ruxolitinib against best available therapy in participants with steroid-refractory chronic graft-versus-host disease (SR cGvHD).
    Location: 12 locations

  • A Study of PDR001 in Combination With LCL161, Everolimus or Panobinostat

    The purpose of this study is to combine the PDR001 checkpoint inhibitor with several agents with immunomodulatory activity to identify the doses and schedule for combination therapy and to preliminarily assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacological and clinical activity of these combinations.
    Location: 9 locations

  • A Study to Evaluate Ibrutinib Combination Therapy in Patients With Selected Gastrointestinal and Genitourinary Tumors

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of single agent ibrutinib or the combination treatments of ibrutinib with everolimus, paclitaxel, docetaxel, pembrolizumab or cetuximab in selected advanced gastrointestinal and genitourinary tumors.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System with or without Everolimus in Treating Patients with Atypical Hyperplasia or Stage IA Grade 1 Endometrial Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system works when given alone or with everolimus in treating patients with atypical hyperplasia (a pre-cancerous growth of the lining of the uterus) or stage IA grade 1 endometrial cancer. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is designed to prevent pregnancy by releasing a hormone called levonorgestrel, which is a type of progesterone. Progesterone is a common type of hormone that is used to prevent pregnancy and may prevent or slow tumor cell growth. Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system works better with or without everolimus in treating patients with atypical hyperplasia or stage IA grade 1 endometrial cancer.
    Location: 13 locations

  • Molecular Profiling-Based Targeted Therapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies molecular profiling-based targeted therapy in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Adavosertib, everolimus, and trametinib are drugs that each target a specific variation in tumors by blocking different proteins needed for cell growth. Veliparib blocks an enzyme that helps repair deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damaged by chemotherapy, which may help chemotherapy drugs work better. It is not yet known whether testing patients for variations in their tumor and assigning treatment targeting the variation is more effective than standard non-targeted therapy in treating advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Safety Study of BTK Inhibitor, DTRMWXHS-12, Used Singly or in Combination, in CLL and B-cell Lymphomas

    This study will evaluate the safety, antitumor activity and preliminary pharmacokinetics of an investigational drug product, DTRMWXHS-12, in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or other B-cell lymphomas. DTRMWXHS-12 will be evaluated as a single agent, and in combination. This study will be conducted in two parts: phase Ia and Ib. Both parts will explore escalating doses of DTRMWXHS-12. The phase Ia study will evaluate DTRMWXHS-12 monotherapy. The phase Ib study will evaluate DTRMWXHS-12 combinations.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Ribociclib and Everolimus in Treating Children with Recurrent or Refractory Malignant Brain Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ribociclib and everolimus and to see how well they work in treating patients with malignant brain tumors that have come back or do not respond to treatment. Ribociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as everolimus, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ribociclib and everolimus may work better at treating malignant brain tumors.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Safety and Efficacy of Everolimus Treatment in Liver Transplantation for Liver Cancer

    This study is a prospective Phase IV study to determine if the use of Everolimus results in lower liver tumor recurrence and improved patient and graft survival after liver transplant for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The immunosuppressive comparators will be Everolimus and Tacrolimus therapy compared to Tacrolimus and Mycophenolic acid / Mycophenolate Mofetil / Azathioprine. Primary outcomes data is disease free survival (the time from randomization to HCC recurrence or death). Secondary outcomes are rate of recurrence of Hepatitis C, problems related to wound healing, hernia repair within the first 12 months, hepatic arterial thrombosis, renal function, acute cellular rejection, post-transplant diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Carboplatin with or without Everolimus in Treating Patients with Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies carboplatin with or without everolimus in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and everolimus, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 4 locations

  • A Study of LY2835219 (Abemaciclib) in Combination With Therapies for Breast Cancer That Has Spread

    This study evaluates the safety of abemaciclib in combination therapies (letrozole, anastrozole, tamoxifen, exemestane, exemestane plus everolimus, trastuzumab, LY3023414 plus fulvestrant, pertuzumab plus trastuzumab with loperamide) for breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Ribociclib in Combination with Everolimus and Dexamethasone in Treating Children and Young Adults with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of ribociclib when given with everolimus and dexamethasone, and to see how well they work in treating children and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Ribociclib and everolimus may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ribociclib together with everolimus and dexamethasone may work as a possible treatment for relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study of Ribociclib and Everolimus Following Radiation Therapy in Children With Newly Diagnosed Non-biopsied Diffuse Pontine Gliomas (DIPG) and RB+ Biopsied DIPG and High Grade Gliomas (HGG)

    In this research study, we want to learn about the safety of the study drugs, ribociclib and everolimus, when given together at different doses after radiation therapy. We also want to learn about the effects, if any, these drugs have on children and young adults with brain tumors. We are asking people to be in this research study who have been diagnosed with a high grade glioma, their tumor has been screened for the Rb1 protein, and they have recently finished radiation therapy. If a patient has DIPG or a Bi-thalamic high grade glioma, they do not need to have the tumor tissue screened for the Rb1 protein, but do need to have finished radiation therapy. Tumor cells grow and divide quickly. In normal cells, there are proteins that control how fast cells grow but in cancer cells these proteins no longer work correctly making tumor cells grow quickly. Both study drugs work in different ways to slow down the growth of tumor cells. The researchers think that if the study drugs are given together soon after radiation therapy, it may help improve the effect of the radiation in stopping or slowing down tumor growth. The study drugs, ribociclib and everolimus, have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Ribociclib is approved to treat adults with breast cancer and everolimus is approved for use in adults and children who have other types of cancers. The combination of ribociclib and everolimus has not been tested in children or in people with brain tumors and is considered investigational. The goals of this study are: - Find the safest dose of ribociclib and everolimus that can be given together after radiation. - Learn the side effects (both good and bad) the study drugs have on the body and tumor. - Measure the levels of study drug in the blood over time. - Study the changes in the endocrine system that may be caused by the tumor, surgery or radiation.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Everolimus, Nelarabine, Cyclophosphamide, and Etoposide Phosphate in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory T Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of everolimus and to see how well it works when given together with nelarabine, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide phosphate in treating patients with T cell lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as everolimus, nelarabine, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Trial to Assess Safety and Efficacy of Lenvatinib in Combination With Everolimus in Participants With Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Study E7080-G000-218 is a Randomized, open-label (formerly Double-blind), Phase 2 Trial conducted to assess whether a starting dose of lenvatinib 14 milligrams (mg) in combination with everolimus 5 mg once daily (QD) will provide comparable efficacy (based on objective response rate [ORR] at 24 weeks [ORR24W]) with an improved safety profile compared to lenvatinib 18 mg in combination with everolimus 5 mg (based on treatment-emergent intolerable Grade 2, or any ≥ Grade 3 adverse events (AEs) in the first 24 weeks after randomization).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Ribociclib and Everolimus in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Refractory Dedifferentiated Liposarcoma or Leiomyosarcoma

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well ribociclib and everolimus work in treating patients with dedifferentiated liposarcoma or leiomyosarcoma that has spread to nearby tissue or to other places in the body or has not responded to treatment. Ribociclib and everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Ribociclib and Everolimus in Treating Patients with Advanced Well Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumors of Foregut Origin

    This phase II trial studies how well ribociclib and everolimus work in treating patients with well differentiated neuroendocrine tumors of foregut origin that have spread to other parts of the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Ribociclib and everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Lenvatinib and Everolimus in Treating Patients with Advanced, Unresectable Carcinoid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well lenvatinib and everolimus work in treating patients with carcinoid tumors that have spread to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Lenvatinib and everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Itacitinib and Everolimus in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of itacitinib when given together with everolimus in treating patients with classic Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Itacitinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as everolimus, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving itacitinib with everolimus may work better in treating patients with classic Hodgkin lymphoma compared to giving itacitinib or everolimus alone.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • The XENERA™-1 Study Tests Xentuzumab in Combination With Everolimus and Exemestane in Post-menopausal Women With Hormone Receptor Positive and HER2-negative Breast Cancer That Has Spread

    The main objective of the trial is to assess the anti-tumor activity of xentuzumab in combination with everolimus and exemestane over everolimus and exemestane in post menopausal patients with HR+ / HER2- advanced or metastatic breast cancer and non-visceral disease.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Dasatinib and Everolimus in Treating Children with Newly Diagnosed, Recurrent, or Progressive High-Grade Glioma with PDGFR Alterations

    This phase II trial studies how well dasatinib and everolimus work in treating children with high-grade glioma with PDGFR alterations that is newly diagnosed, has come back, or is growing, spreading or getting worse. Dasatinib and everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Lenvatinib and Everolimus before Surgery in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Kidney Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well lenvatinib and everolimus before surgery work in treating patients with kidney cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes or other places in the body. Lenvatinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as everolimus, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving lenvatinib and everolimus may cause kidney cancer to shrink more than either drug taken alone, thus potentially making it possible to remove the tumor with surgery.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Neratinib and Everolimus, Palbociclib, or Trametinib in Treating Participants with Refractory and Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors with EGFR Mutation / Amplification, HER2 Mutation / Amplification, or HER3 / 4 Mutation or KRAS Mutation

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of neratinib in combination with everolimus, palbociclib, or trametinib in participants with solid tumors with EGFR mutation / amplification, HER2 mutation / amplification, HER3 / 4 mutation, or KRAS mutation that do not respond to treatment (refractory) and have spread to other parts of the body (advanced or metastatic). Neratinib, palbociclib, and trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as everolimus, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving neratinib with everolimus, palbociclib, or trametinib may work better than neratinib alone in treating participants with solid tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Efficacy and Safety of 177Lu-edotreotide PRRT in GEP-NET Patients

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate efficacy and safety of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) with 177Lu-Edotreotide compared to targeted molecular therapy with Everolimus in patients with inoperable, progressive, somatostatin receptor-positive (SSTR+), neuroendocrine tumours of gastroenteric or pancreatic origin (GEP-NET).
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Hydroxychloroquine Sulfate, Everolimus, or the Combination in Preventing Recurrence in Patients with Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II pilot trial studies how well hydroxychloroquine sulfate, everolimus, or the combination work in preventing recurrence in patients with breast cancer. Hydroxychloroquine sulfate and everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


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