Clinical Trials Using Inotuzumab Ozogamicin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Inotuzumab Ozogamicin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-15 of 15
  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Frontline Chemotherapy in Treating Young Adults with Newly Diagnosed B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of inotuzumab ozogamicin and how well it works when given with frontline chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with chemotherapy may work better in treating young adults with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 296 locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Post-Induction Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with High-Risk B-ALL, Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia, and B-LLy

    This phase III trial studies whether inotuzumab ozogamicin added to post-induction chemotherapy for patients with High-Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) improves outcomes. This trial also studies the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL), and B-lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with ALL therapy without inotuzumab ozogamicin. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a type of chemotherapy called calicheamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers calicheamicin to kill them. Other drugs used in the chemotherapy regimen, such as cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, methotrexate, leucovorin, mercaptopurine, prednisone, thioguanine, vincristine, and pegaspargase work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial will also study the outcomes of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) and disseminated B lymphoblastic lymphoma (B-LLy) when treated with high-risk ALL chemotherapy. The overall goal of this study is to understand if adding inotuzumab ozogamicin to standard of care chemotherapy maintains or improves outcomes in High Risk B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (HR B-ALL). The first part of the study includes the first two phases of therapy: Induction and Consolidation. This part will collect information on the leukemia, as well as the effects of the initial treatment, in order to classify patients into post-consolidation treatment groups. On the second part of this study, patients will receive the remainder of the chemotherapy cycles (interim maintenance I, delayed intensification, interim maintenance II, maintenance), with some patients randomized to receive inotuzumab. Other aims of this study include investigating whether treating both males and females with the same duration of chemotherapy maintains outcomes for males who have previously been treated for an additional year compared to girls, as well as to evaluate the best ways to help patients adhere to oral chemotherapy regimens. Finally, this study will be the first to track the outcomes of subjects with disseminated B-cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B LLy) or Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia (MPAL) when treated with B-ALL chemotherapy.
    Location: 184 locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed, Recurrent, or Refractory CD22-Positive B-Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin and blinatumomab work in treating patients with CD22-positive B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is newly diagnosed, has come back, or does not respond to treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin and blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 86 locations

  • A Study Of Two Inotuzumab Ozogamicin Doses in Relapsed / Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Transplant Eligible Patients

    This study will explore 2 different doses of inotuzumab ozogamicin including the dose that is approved and a lower dose. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate whether a dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin, lower than the approved dose, could be recommended for adult patient with relapsed or refractory ALL who may be at higher risk for severe liver problems after inotuzumab ozogamicin treatment and stem cell transplant (a potentially curative therapy that can replace cancer cells with healthy cells). Efficacy and safety of the 2 doses will be evaluated.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin in combination with chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin in combination with chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells than with chemotherapy alone in treating patients with recurrent or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin with Standard Chemotherapy Regimen for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin when given with 3 and 4 drug standard chemotherapy regimen in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Chemotherapy drugs, such as daunorubicin, vincristine, cytarabine, methotrexate, and pegaspargase, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as prednisone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with standard chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared to inotuzumab ozogamicin alone.
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with MRD Positive CD22+ Relapsed B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin works in treating patients with minimal residual disease (MRD) positive CD22 positive (+) B cell acute lymphoblastic lymphoma that has come back. Minimal residual disease is when there is evidence for remaining tumor following initial treatment that is only apparent using highly sensitive techniques, but there are no other signs of leukemia in the bone marrow or blood yet. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22+ cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them.
    Location: Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Leukemia or Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    The goal of this phase II clinical study is to learn about the safety of inotuzumab ozogamicin when given with fludarabine, with or without bendamustine, melphalan, and rituximab before and after a stem cell transplant. Researchers also want to learn if inotuzumab ozogamicin when given after a stem cell transplant can help control leukemia and lymphoma. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22-positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Giving chemotherapy before a bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor attack the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving tacrolimus and filgrastim before or after the transplant may stop this from happening. Fludarabine, bendamustine, melphalan, and rituximab are commonly given before stem cell transplants. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin with chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with leukemia or lymphoma undergoing stem cell transplantation.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with B-cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia with Positive Minimal Residual Disease

    This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin works in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia with positive minimal residual disease. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody called inotuzumab linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab ozogamicin attaches to B cell-specific CD22 cancer cells in a targeted way and kills them.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia after Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin and how well it works in treating patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia after transplant. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent, called CalichDMH. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers CalichDMH to kill them.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Bosutinib and Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of bosutinib when given together with inotuzumab ozogamicin and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Bosutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotoxins, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, are antibodies linked to a toxic substance and may help find cancer cells that express CD22 and kill them without harming normal cells. Giving bosutinib together with inotuzumab ozogamicin may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic myeloid leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients with Previously Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin and to see how well it works when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating older patients with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called N-acetyl-gamma-calicheamicin dimethyl hydrazide (CalichDMH). Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers CalichDMH to kill them. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin together with combination chemotherapy may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Tisagenlecleucel vs Blinatumomab or Inotuzumab for Patients With Relapsed / Refractory B-cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This trial aims to compare the benefits and risks of tisagenlecleucel to blinatumomab or inotuzumab in adult patients with relapsed or refractory ALL. This trial investigates tisagenlecleucel as an additional treatment option for this patient population with high unmet medical need.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Vincristine Sulfate Liposome in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory CD22+ B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase Ib / II trial studies side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin and how well it works when given together with vincristine sulfate liposome in treating patients with CD22 positive (+) B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or dose not respond to treatment. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22+ cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate liposome, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin and vincristine sulfate liposome together may work better in treating patients with CD22+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared to giving inotuzumab ozogamicin or vincristine sulfate liposome alone.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Younger Patients with B-Lymphoblastic Lymphoma or Relapsed or Refractory CD22 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin works in treating younger patients with B-lymphoblastic lymphoma or CD22 positive B acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Immunotoxins, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin, are antibodies linked to a toxic substance and may help find cancer cells that express CD22 and kill them without harming normal cells.
    Location: 130 locations