Clinical Trials Using Leucovorin Calcium

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Leucovorin Calcium. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 61

  • Selinexor with Multiple Standard Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients with Advanced Malignancies

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor when given together with several different standard chemotherapy or immunotherapy regimens in treating patients with malignancies that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced). Selinexor may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Studying selinexor with different standard chemotherapy or immunotherapy regimens may help doctors learn the side effects and best dose of selinexor that can be given with different types of treatments in one study.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Nivolumab and Chemotherapy with or without CV301 Vaccine in Treating Patients with Resectable Hepatic-Limited Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and chemotherapy, with or without the CV301 vaccine, works in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread only to the liver (hepatic-limited metastatic) and can be removed by surgery (resectable). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies such as nivolumab may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vaccines such as CV301 are made from gene-modified viruses and may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. This study may help researchers determine if the combination of nivolumab and the CV301 vaccine works better than nivolumab only in treating patients with colorectal cancer. This study may also help researchers determine if nivolumab and the CV301 vaccine, when combined with standard chemotherapy and surgery, works better in treating patients with colorectal cancer when compared to chemotherapy and surgery only.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Oxaliplatin, Leucovorin Calcium, and Fluorouracil Followed by Surgery and Response Based Concurrent Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Esophageal, Gastroesophageal Junction, or Gastric Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil followed by surgery and response based concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy works in treating patients with esophageal, gastroesophageal junction, or gastric cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving chemotherapy followed by surgery and response based chemotherapy and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Chemotherapy with or without Radiation Therapy in Treating Participants with Gastric Cancer after Surgical Analysis of Lymph Nodes

    This early phase I pilot trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy work in treating participants with gastric cancer who have undergone surgical analysis of the lymph nodes. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, capecitabine, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not yet known whether giving chemotherapy and radiation will work better in treating participants with gastric cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Liposomal Irinotecan, Fluorouracil, Leucovorin Calcium, and Rucaparib in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic, Colorectal, Gastroesophageal, or Biliary Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of liposomal irinotecan and rucaparib when given together with fluorouracil and leucovorin calcium and to see how well they work in treating patients with pancreatic, colorectal, gastroesophageal, or biliary cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as liposomal irinotecan, fluorouracil, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. PARPs are proteins that help repair DNA mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as rucaparib, can keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can't repair themselves, and they may stop growing. Giving liposomal irinotecan and rucaparib together with fluorouracil and leucovorin calcium may work better in treating patients with pancreatic, colorectal, gastroesophageal, or biliary cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study of Multiple Immunotherapy-Based Treatment Combinations in Patients With Locally Advanced Unresectable or Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer (G / GEJ) or Esophageal Cancer (Morpheus-Gastric and Esophageal Cancer)

    A Phase Ib / II, open label, multi-center, randomized study designed to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and preliminary anti-tumor activity of immunotherapy-based treatment combinations in patients with locally advanced unresectable or metastatic G / GEJ cancer (hereafter referred to as gastric cancer) and esophageal cancer. Two cohorts of patients with gastric cancer have been enrolled in parallel in this study: the second-line (2L) Gastric Cancer Cohort consists of patients with gastric cancer who have progressed after receiving a platinum-containing or fluoropyrimide-containing chemotherapy regimen in the first-line setting, and the first-line (1L) Gastric Cancer Cohort consists of patients with gastric cancer who have not received prior chemotherapy in this setting. In each cohort, eligible patients will be assigned to one of several treatment arms. Additionally, a cohort of patients with esophageal cancer who have not received prior systemic treatment for their disease will be enrolled in this study. Eligible patients will be randomized to chemotherapy or the combination of chemotherapy with checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Adult Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy works in treating adult patients with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Risk-Adapted Therapy in Treating Young Patients with Mature B-Cell Lymphoma or Leukemia

    Many children and young adults with mature B-cell lymphoma can be cured with current standard treatments, but these standard treatments do not stop every child’s cancer from coming back. Furthermore, many children have significant side effects from treatment, both at the time of treatment and for many years after treatment is completed (late effects). That is why there is still much to be learned about this disease and its treatment. This study is being done to help researchers learn more about the biology and genetics of this disease in children in the United States (U.S.) and at several international sites and to study the effects (good and bad) of this treatment in St. Jude participants in order to help researchers guide treatment for children and young adults with this disease in the future.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) Versus Placebo in Participants With Esophageal Carcinoma Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy (MK-3475-975 / KEYNOTE-975)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of treatment with definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) + pembrolizumab (MK-3475) compared to treatment with dCRT + placebo with respect to Overall Survival (OS) and Event-free survival (EFS) in: - participants with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), - participants whose tumors express Programmed Death-Ligand 1 (PD-L1) Combined Positive Score (CPS) ≥10, and - all participants. The primary study hypotheses are that dCRT+ pembrolizumab is better than dCRT + placebo with respect to: - OS in participants with ESCC, - OS in participants whose tumors express PD-L1 CPS ≥10, - OS in all participants, - EFS in participants with ESCC, - EFS in participants whose tumors express PD-L1 CPS ≥10, and - EFS in all participants.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Preservation of Organs in Participants with Early Rectal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies preservation of organs in participants with early rectal cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin, and calcium fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy), and giving them after local excision may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells and allow doctors to save the part of the body where the cancer started.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study of the Safety and Tolerability of ABBV-621 in Participants With Previously-Treated Solid Tumors and Hematologic Malignancies

    This is an open-label, Phase I, dose-escalation study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and / or recommended phase two dose (RPTD), and evaluate the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of ABBV-621 for participants with previously-treated solid tumors or hematologic malignancies.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients with Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best way to give pembrolizumab with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy before surgery and to see how well it works in treating adult patients with gastroesophageal junction or gastric cardia cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue (locally advanced) and can be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving pembrolizumab, combination chemotherapy, and radiation therapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Study of MK-4280 as Monotherapy and in Combination With Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) With or Without Chemotherapy or Lenvatinib AND MK-4280A as Monotherapy in Adults With Advanced Solid Tumors (MK-4280-001)

    This is a safety and pharmacokinetics study of MK-4280 as monotherapy and in combination with pembrolizumab (MK-3475) AND MK-4280A as monotherapy in adults with metastatic solid tumors for which there is no available therapy which may convey clinical benefit. Part A of this study is a dose escalation design in which participants receive MK-4280 as monotherapy or MK-4280 in combination with pembrolizumab. Part B is a dose confirmation design to estimate the recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D), as determined by dose-limiting toxicity, for MK-4280 in combination with pembrolizumab or pembrolizumab and lenvatinib in participants with advanced solid tumors. Part B will also assess the efficacy of MK-4280 as monotherapy; MK-4280 in combination with pembrolizumab with and without chemotherapy; MK-4280 in combination with pembrolizumab and lenvatinib; and MK-4280A as monotherapy in expansion cohorts.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Hepatic Arterial Infusion Using Codman Catheter / Synchromed Pump for the Treatment of Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases or Unresectable Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) using the Codman catheter / Synchromed pump in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to the liver (metastases) and cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. HAI is a procedure in which chemotherapy drugs are directly delivered to the liver through a pump that is surgically implanted into the liver. This approach can produce higher local concentrations of the infused drug with few systemic side effects. The manufacturer of the main pump device used for HAI terminated production in April 2018. Thus, alternate means of employing HAI need to be devised in order to continue offering this therapy. This trial may help researchers learn about the safety of HAI using a similar pump, the Synchromed II, combined with a Codman vascular catheter.
    Location: University of Kentucky / Markey Cancer Center, Lexington, Kentucky

  • APX005M, mFOLFOX Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Stage II-IV Rectal Cancer, The INNATE Trial

    This phase II trial investigates how well APX005M, modified (m)FOLFOX chemotherapy regimen (fluorouracil, leucovorin calcium, oxaliplatin), and radiation therapy works in treating patients with rectal cancer. APX005M is a type of immunotherapy called a monoclonal antibody which may help treat cancer by strengthening the immune system. Chemotherapy drugs, such as fluorouracil, leucovorin calcium, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. The addition of APX005M to mFOLFOX (standard of care chemotherapy for rectal cancer) and radiation therapy may help improve response rates and long-term outcomes in treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer patients.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Phase II Study of Short Course FOLFOX Chemotherapy With Either Nivolumab or Nivolumab + Radiation in the First Line Treatment of Metastatic or Unresectable Gastroesophageal Cancers (BMS Protocol CA209-76L)

    This is a randomized phase II study examining nivolumab alone versus radiation therapy with nivolumab in subjects who did not have disease progression to initial therapy with the combination of FOLFOX and Nivolumab.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Study of GS-1423 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors

    For Phase 1a Part A, the primary objectives are to assess safety and tolerability and to define the dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of GS-1423 monotherapy in participants with advanced solid tumors. For Phase 1a Part B, the primary objective is to assess safety and tolerability of GS-1423 monotherapy in participants with advanced solid tumors. For Phase 1b Cohort 1 safety run-in, the primary objective is to assess safety and tolerability and to define the DLT and MTD or RP2D of GS-1423 in combination with a chemotherapy regimen in participants with advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. For Phase 1b Cohort 1 post safety run-in, the primary objective is to assess the preliminary efficacy of GS-1423 in combination with a chemotherapy regimen in participants with advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, as assessed by the confirmed objective response rate (ORR). For Phase 1b Cohort 2, the primary objective is to assess safety and tolerability of GS-1423 monotherapy in participants with advanced solid tumors.
    Location: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Stage I-IIIB Rectal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well patients with stage I-IIIB rectal cancer respond to a short course of radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy. Radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin, fluorouracil, and capecitabine work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. A combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy may prevent patients from needing surgery, could delay their need for surgery, or may mean that they need less drastic surgery and could potentially avoid a permanent ostomy (a surgically created connection between the intestine and the abdominal wall that allows for elimination of stool).
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Liposomal Irinotecan, 5-FU, Leucovorin, and Paricalcitol in Treating Patients with Advanced Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer That Has Progressed on Gemcitabine-Based Therapy

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of paricalcitol when given together with liposomal irinotecan, 5-FU, and leucovorin in treating patients with pancreatic cancer whose disease has progressed on therapy containing gemcitabine, and that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) and cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Paricalcitol is currently used to prevent and treat hyperparathyroidism associated with chronic kidney disease. It may promote tumor cell death by acting on some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as liposomal irinotecan, 5-FU and leucovorin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This study may help researchers determine what the recommended dose of paricalcitol is when given with liposomal irinotecan, 5-FU, and leucovorin.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • CPI-613 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well CPI-613 and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced). CPI-613 inhibits energy production in cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, irinotecan hydrochloride, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CPI-613 and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • FOLFIRINOX Regimen or Gemcitabine-Nab-paclitaxel Followed by Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable or Borderline Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX regimen) or gemcitabine-nab-paclitaxel followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread from its original site to nearby tissues or lymph nodes and cannot be removed by surgery, or is difficult to remove by surgery due to the tumor surrounding major blood channels in the pancreas. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as the FOLFIRINOX regimen and gemcitabine-nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving the FOLFIRINOX regimen or gemcitabine-nab-paclitaxel followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: University of Alabama at Birmingham Cancer Center, Birmingham, Alabama

  • Low-Intensity Chemotherapy and Blinatumomab in treating Patients with Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well low-intensity chemotherapy and blinatumomab work in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, filgrastim, pegfilgrastim, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, cytarabine and vincristine sulfate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving low-intensity chemotherapy and blinatumomab may work better at treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Personalized Antibodies in Treating Patients with Metastatic Stomach or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    This pilot phase II trial studies personalized antibodies in treating patients with stomach or gastroesophageal junction cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Testing tumor tissue for gene mutations and protein expression patterns and using drugs that target the specific profile of the tumor, may work better than standard chemotherapy in treating patients with stomach or gastroesophageal junction cancer.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Combination Chemotherapy before and after Surgery in Treating Patients with Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy before and after surgery works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving combination chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving these treatments after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Treatment for Advanced B-Cell Lymphoma

    To safely reduce the burden of therapy in children, adolescents and young adults with mature B-NHL by reducing the number of intrathecal (IT) injections by the introduction of IT Liposomal Cytarabine (L-ARA-C, [Depocyt®]) and reducing the dose of anthracycline (doxorubicin) in good risk patients with the addition of rituximab to the FAB chemotherapy backbone (Immunochemotherapy).
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah