Clinical Trials Using Leucovorin Calcium

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Leucovorin Calcium. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-59 of 59

  • Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Stage I-IIIB Rectal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well patients with stage I-IIIB rectal cancer respond to a short course of radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy. Radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin, fluorouracil, and capecitabine work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. A combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy may prevent patients from needing surgery, could delay their need for surgery, or may mean that they need less drastic surgery and could potentially avoid a permanent ostomy (a surgically created connection between the intestine and the abdominal wall that allows for elimination of stool).
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Entinostat and the FOLFOX Chemotherapy Regimen in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the best dose of entinostat when given together with the standard of care FOLFOX chemotherapy regimen in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Entinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in the FOLFOX chemotherapy regimen, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving the standard FOLFOX regimen together with entinostat may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer compared to the FOLFOX regimen alone.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab with or without PRI-724 in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy and bevacizumab with or without CBP / beta-catenin antagonist PRI-724 (PRI-724) works in treating patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin calcium, oxaliplatin, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. PRI-724 may help stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking the specific signaling pathway that cancer cells need to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy and bevacizumab works better with or without PRI-724 in treating patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving combination chemotherapy followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Veliparib, Pembrolizumab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patient with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well veliparib or pembrolizumab work with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as modified (m)FOLFOX6 regimen, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving veliparib or pembrolizumab with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells, make the tumor smaller, and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: 616 locations

  • Azacitidine and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Infants with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and KMT2A Gene Rearrangement

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of azacitidine and combination chemotherapy in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and KMT2A gene rearrangement. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, prednisolone, daunorubicin hydrochloride, cytarabine, dexamethasone, vincristine sulfate, pegaspargase, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, azacitidine, cyclophosphamide, mercaptopurine, leucovorin calcium, and thioguanine work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 160 locations

  • Intensive Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well intensive combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, prednisone, leucovorin calcium, cytarabine, etoposide, and liposomal cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as mercaptopurine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Dietary supplements, such as levocarnitine, may reduce the incidence of liver damage. Pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy with, rituximab, mercaptopurine, levocarnitine, pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Lidocaine Hydrochloride in Preventing Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Stage III-IV Colorectal Cancer

    This randomized phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of lidocaine hydrochloride and how well it works in preventing oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with stage III-IV colorectal cancer. Lidocaine hydrochloride may work by blocking the nerve damaging effects of oxaliplatin.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Dasatinib in Preventing Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Stage IV Colorectal Cancer Receiving FOLFOX Regimen and Bevacizumab

    This phase Ib trial studies side effects and best dose of dasatinib in preventing oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who are receiving FOLFOX regimen and bevacizumab. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX regimen), work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. However, the buildup of oxaliplatin in the cranial nerves can result in damage or the nerves. Dasatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Blocking these enzymes may reduce oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio