Clinical Trials Using Leucovorin Calcium

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Leucovorin Calcium. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-61 of 61

  • Veliparib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of veliparib when given together with combination chemotherapy and to see how well it works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving veliparib and combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia

  • Different Therapies in Treating Infants With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving cyclosporine, methotrexate, leucovorin, and antithymocyte globulin before and after transplant may stop this from happening. It is not yet known which treatment regimen is most effective in treating acute leukemia. PURPOSE: This randomized clinical trial is studying how well different therapies work in treating infants with newly diagnosed acute leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • NeoOPTIMIZE: Early Switching of mFOLFIRINOX or Gemcitabine / Nab-Paclitaxel before Surgery for the Treatment of Resectable or Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial evaluates whether early switching from modified fluorouracil / irinotecan / leucovorin / oxaliplatin (mFOLFIRINOX) chemotherapy regimen to a combination of gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel (GA) before surgery is effective in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be surgically removed (resectable or borderline resectable). Chemotherapy drugs, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, gemcitabine, and nab-paclitaxel work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The study will also evaluate the drug losartan in combination with mFOLFIRINOX or GA.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • A Study to Compare Blinatumomab Alone to Blinatumomab with Nivolumab in Patients Diagnosed with First Relapse B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL)

    This phase II trial investigates how well nivolumab when given together with blinatumomab work compared to blinatumomab alone in treating patients with CD19+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or Down syndrome that has come back (relapsed). Blinatumomab is an antibody, which is a protein that identifies and targets foreign substances in the body. Blinatumomab searches for and attaches itself to the cancer cell. Once attached, an immune response occurs that kills the cancer cell. Nivolumab is a medicine that is used to boost a patient’s immune system. Giving nivolumab in combination with blinatumomab may cause the cancer to stop growing for a period of time, and for some patients, it may lessen the symptoms, such as pain, that are caused by the cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Testing the Addition of an Anticancer Drug, BAY 1895344, to the Usual Chemotherapy in Advanced or Metastatic Cancers of the Stomach and Intestines

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects and best dose of BAY 1895344 when giving together with usual chemotherapy in treating patients with stomach or intestinal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic). BAY 1895344 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as irinotecan, fluorouracil, and leucovorin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BAY 1895344 with usual chemotherapy may help shrink cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Digoxin for the Treatment of Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase IIa trial studies how well neoadjuvant chemotherapy and digoxin work in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that can be removed by surgery (resectable). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan, leucovorin calcium, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Digoxin may improve cancer drugs effect and slow tumor growth. Given neoadjuvant chemotherapy and digoxin together may work better in treating patients with resectable pancreatic cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska

  • Nivolumab in Combination with Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies how well nivolumab and combination chemotherapy work before surgery in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that could possibly be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, irinotecan hydrochloride, leucovorin calcium and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nivolumab in combination with chemotherapy before surgery may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Modified FOLFIRINOX and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Patients with Non-Metastatic Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well the combination of chemotherapy drugs called FOLFIRINOX (levoleucovorin or leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin) followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy works in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has not spread to other places in the body (non-metastatic) and cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Chemotherapy drugs, such as levoleucovorin or leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a radiation therapy approach which delivers high dose radiation to a tumor in the body in a single treatment session or up to 5 treatment sessions (one dose per day). Giving chemotherapy with stereotactic body radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Intensive Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well intensive combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, prednisone, leucovorin calcium, cytarabine, etoposide, and liposomal cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as mercaptopurine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Dietary supplements, such as levocarnitine, may reduce the incidence of liver damage. Pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy with, rituximab, mercaptopurine, levocarnitine, pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Rituximab in Treating Younger Patients with Stage III-IV Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or B-Cell Acute Leukemia

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy with or without rituximab works in treating younger patients with stage III-IV non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibody, such as rituximab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy together with rituximab is more effective in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma or B-cell acute leukemia.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Lidocaine Hydrochloride in Preventing Oxaliplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients with Stage III-IV Colorectal Cancer

    This randomized phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of lidocaine hydrochloride and how well it works in preventing oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with stage III-IV colorectal cancer. Lidocaine hydrochloride may work by blocking the nerve damaging effects of oxaliplatin.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri