Clinical Trials Using Mesna

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Mesna. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-7 of 7
  • Accelerated or Standard BEP Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Intermediate or Poor-Risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well an accelerated schedule of bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy works compared to the standard schedule of BEP chemotherapy in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk germ cell tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BEP chemotherapy on a faster, or “accelerated” schedule may work better with fewer side effects in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumors compared to the standard schedule.
    Location: 139 locations

  • Testing the Use of Steroids and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors with Blinatumomab or Chemotherapy for Newly Diagnosed BCR-ABL-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults

    This phase III trial compares the effect of usual treatment of chemotherapy and steroids and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) to the same treatment plus blinatumomab. Blinatumomab is a Bi-specific T-Cell Engager (‘BiTE’) that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. The information gained from this study may help researchers determine if combination therapy with steroids, TKIs, and blinatumomab work better than the standard of care.
    Location: 25 locations

  • Alisertib Alone or in Combination with Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent, Progressive, or Newly Diagnosed Central Nervous System Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors or Extra-Central Nervous System Malignant Rhabdoid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well alisertib alone or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy works in treating younger patients with central nervous system (CNS) atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors that are newly diagnosed; have returned; or are growing, spreading, or getting worse or extra-CNS malignant rhabdoid tumors that have returned or are growing, spreading, or getting worse. Alisertib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein called aurora kinase A that is needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving alisertib alone or with chemotherapy and radiation therapy may be effective in treating patients with rhabdoid tumors.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Haploidentical Bone Marrow Transplantation in Sickle Cell Patients (BMT CTN 1507)

    This is a Phase II, single arm, multi-center trial, designed to estimate the efficacy and toxicity of haploidentical bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Based on their age and entry criteria patients are stratified into two groups: (1) children with SCD with strokes; and (2) adults with severe SCD.
    Location: 7 locations

  • High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose, or myeloablative, chemotherapy and stem cell transplant works in treating patients with neuroblastoma that is at high risk of spreading. Myeloablative chemotherapy uses high doses of chemotherapy to kill cells in the bone marrow, both cancer cells and healthy cells. Healthy stem cells from the patient that were collected before chemotherapy are then returned to the patient in a stem cell transplant to replace the cells that were killed by chemotherapy. Myeloablative chemotherapy and stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Best Available Therapy Versus Autologous Hematopoetic Stem Cell Transplant for Multiple Sclerosis (BEAT-MS)

    This is a multi-center prospective rater-masked (blinded) randomized controlled trial of 156 participants, comparing the treatment strategy of Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (AHSCT) to the treatment strategy of Best Available Therapy (BAT) for treatment-resistant relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants will be randomized at a 1 to 1 (1:1) ratio. All participants will be followed for 72 months after randomization (Day 0, Visit 0).
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Ex-Vivo Expanded and Activated Donor NK Cells and Hu14.18-IL2 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of ex-vivo expanded and activated donor NK cells and hu14.18-IL2 in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Expanded and activated donor NK cells may be able to kill the cancer cells better. Hu14.18-IL2 binds to NK cells and may be able to activate them, improving their ability to stay alive, multiply, and kill cancer cells. Giving ex-vivo expanded and activated donor NK cells and hu14.18-IL2 may work better in treating patients with neuroblastoma.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin