Clinical Trials Using Trastuzumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Trastuzumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 63

  • Trial of mFOLFOX6 + Trastuzumab + Avelumab in Gastric and Esophageal Adenocarcinomas

    This study will be a prospective, open-label, single arm, multi-center phase 2 clinical trial of mFOLFOX6 + trastuzumab + avelumab in first-line, metastatic, HER2-amplified gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas. The primary objective of this study is to estimate the best objective response rate (CR or PR, ORR) in these patients within 24 weeks by RECIST 1.1 criteria. Secondary objectives include; estimating PFS by both RECIST 1.1 and iRECIST criteria, estimating OS, estimating the disease control rate (DCR) at 24 weeks by RECIST 1.1 and iRECIST, and characterizing the safety issues associated with this regimen.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Tucatinib, Trastuzumab, and Capecitabine in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Breast Cancer with Leptomeningeal Metastases

    This phase II trial studies how well tucatinib, trastuzumab, and capecitabine work in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that has spread to the leptomeninges (leptomeningeal metastases). Tucatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving tucatinib, trastuzumab, and capecitabine may help to control leptomeningeal disease and improve survival in patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 4 locations

  • SYD985 vs. Physician's Choice in Participants With HER2-positive Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that SYD985 [(vic-)trastuzumab duocarmazine] is superior to physician's choice in prolonging progression free survival.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Paclitaxel and Cyclophosphamide with or without Trastuzumab before Surgery in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well giving paclitaxel and cyclophosphamide with or without trastuzumab before surgery works in treating patients with previously untreated breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving combination chemotherapy with or without trastuzumab before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: 4 locations

  • TPIV100 and Sargramostim for the Treatment of HER2 Positive, Stage II-III Breast Cancer in Patients with Residual Disease after Chemotherapy and Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well TPIV100 and sargramostim work in treating patients with HER2 positive, stage II-III breast cancer that has remained after chemotherapy and surgery. It also studies why some HER2 positive breast cancer patients respond better to chemotherapy in combination with trastuzumab and pertuzumab. TPIV100 is a type of vaccine made from HER2 peptide that may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express HER2. Sargramostim increases the number of white blood cells in the body following chemotherapy for certain types of cancer and is used to alert the immune system. It is not yet known if TPIV100 and sargramostim will work better in treating patients with HER2 positive, stage II-III breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Atezolizumab, Pertuzumab, and High-Dose Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with Her2-Positive Breast Cancer with Central Nervous System Metastases

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab works when given together with pertuzumab and high-dose trastuzumab in treating patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to the central nervous system from other parts of the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, may induce changes in body’s immune system, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Pertuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Giving atezolizumab, pertuzumab, and trastuzumab may work better in treating patients with breast cancer compared to pertuzumab and trastuzumab.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced, Resectable, or Inflammatory Her2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well two different anti-cancer treatment regimens which both contain trastuzumab and pertuzumab, but with different combinations of chemotherapy work in shrinking cancer before surgery in patients with localized Her2 positive breast cancer. Trastuzumab and pertuzumab are forms of “targeted therapy” because they work by attaching to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab or pertuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, docetaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab with pertuzumab, in addition to combination chemotherapy has been shown to be very effective in shrinking cancer before surgery in patients with Her2 positive locally advanced breast cancer. This trial aims to help determine which regimen may work best with the least toxicity.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Anastrozole, Palbociclib, Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab in Treating Participants with HR-Positive, HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of anastrozole, palbociclib, trastuzumab and pertuzumab and how well they work in treating participants with hormone receptor-(HR) positive, HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other locations in the body. Anastrozole and palbociclib are enzyme inhibitors that may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving anastrozole, palbociclib, trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better in treating participants with HR+, HER2+ metastatic breast cancer.
    Location: 6 locations

  • FASN Inhibitor TVB-2640, Paclitaxel, and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well FASN inhibitor TVB-2640, paclitaxel, and trastuzumab work in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). FASN inhibitor TVB-2640 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving FASN inhibitor TVB-2640, paclitaxel, and trastuzumab may work better in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, Tocilizumab in Treating Participants with Metastatic or Unresectable HER2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of trastuzumab, pertuzumab and tocilizumab in treating participants with HER2 positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies such as trastuzumab, pertuzumab and tocilizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread
    Location: 3 locations

  • Atezolizumab, Paclitaxel, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Breast Cancer That Is Locally Recurrent, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase IIa trial studies the side effects of atezolizumab when given together with paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab and to see how well it works in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that has come back at or near the same place as the original (primary) tumor (locally recurrent), has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), or cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. Pertuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab, paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may work better in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Palbociclib, Letrozole, and Trastuzumab before Surgery in Treating Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive and HER2 Positive Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well palbociclib, letrozole, and trastuzumab work before surgery in treating patients with estrogen receptor (ER) positive and HER2 positive stage II-III breast cancer. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs, such as letrozole, may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving palbociclib, letrozole, and trastuzumab before surgery may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Cyclophosphamide, Paclitaxel, and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with Stage I-II HER2 / neu Positive Breast Cancer after Surgery

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, and trastuzumab work when given after surgery in treating patients with stage I-II human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2 / neu) positive breast cancer (confined to the breast or the breast and lymph nodes under the arm). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, and trastuzumab after surgery may help prevent the cancer from coming back.
    Location: 3 locations

  • GDC-0084 and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    This phase II trial studies how well PI3K inhibitor GDC-0084 (GDC-0084) in combination with trastuzumab works in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that has spread to the brain. GDC-0084 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of breast cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by body’s immune system. It is not yet known how a HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to the brain responds to combination of GDC-0084 and trastuzumab.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Nivolumab and Standard Chemotherapy before Surgery in Treating Patients with Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and standard chemotherapy work before surgery in treating patients with inflammatory breast cancer. Immunotherapy with a monoclonal antibody such as nivolumab works by attaching to and blocking a molecule called PD-1. PD-1 is a protein that is present on different types of cells in the immune system and controls parts of the immune system by shutting it down. Antibodies that block PD-1 can potentially prevent PD-1 from shutting down the immune system, thus allowing immune cells to recognize and destroy tumor cells. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the addition of nivolumab to standard chemotherapy improves response rate in patients with inflammatory breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study To Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety Of Atezolizumab or Placebo in Combination With Neoadjuvant Doxorubicin + Cyclophosphamide Followed By Paclitaxel + Trastuzumab + Pertuzumab In Early Her2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This study (also known as IMpassion050) will evaluate the efficacy and safety of atezolizumab compared with placebo when given in combination with neoadjuvant dose-dense anthracycline (doxorubicin) + cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel + trastuzumab + pertuzumab (ddAC-PacHP) in patients with early HER2-positive breast cancer (T2-4, N1-3, M0).
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study Evaluating Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Therapeutic Activity of RO6874281 as a Single Agent (Part A) or in Combination With Trastuzumab or Cetuximab (Part B or C)

    This first-in-human, open-label, multicenter, Phase Ia / Ib, adaptive, multiple ascending-dose study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary anti-tumor activity of RO6874281 as a single agent (Part A) or in combination with trastuzumab or cetuximab (Part B or C).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Alpha-TEA and Trastuzumab for the Treatment of Refractory HER2+ Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of alpha-TEA when given together with trastuzumab and to see how well they work for the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer that does not respond to treatment (refractory) and has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Anti-cancer treatment, such as alpha-TEA, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Alpha-TEA may also alter cancer growth by stimulating the body’s immune response against the tumor. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Giving alpha-TEA and trastuzumab may work better for the treatment of HER2+ refractory and metastatic breast cancer compared to usual treatment.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Study of Neratinib +Trastuzumab or Neratinib + Cetuximab in Patients With KRAS / NRAS / BRAF / PIK3CA Wild-Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer by HER2 Status

    This is a phase II trial to examine the efficacy of neratinib plus trastuzumab or neratinib plus cetuximab in patients with "quadruple wild-type" (all RAS / NRAS / BRAF / PIK3CA wild-type), metastatic colorectal cancer based on HER2 status (amplified, non-amplified [wild-type] or mutated). Patients must have confirmed quadruple wild-type (WT) genotype, via NSABP MPR-1 or from colonic biopsy or a metastatic biopsy taken prior to treatment, and known HER2 status.
    Location: 2 locations

  • HER2 Directed Dendritic Cell Vaccine, Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, and Chemotherapy in Treating Participants with Stage II-III HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well a HER2 directed dendritic cell vaccine, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and chemotherapy work in treating participants with stage II-III HER-2 positive breast cancer. Dendritic cells are immune cells that can tell the immune system to fight infection. Vaccines made from a person's dendritic cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express HER2. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving a HER2 directed dendritic cell vaccine, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and chemotherapy may work better in participants with HER-2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Utomilumab with Trastuzumab Emtansine or Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with Advanced HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of utomilumab with trastuzumab emtansine or trastuzumab in treating patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as utomilumab and trastuzumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trastuzumab emtansine is a monoclonal antibody, where trastuzumab is linked to a chemotherapy drug called DM1. Trastuzumab attaches to HER2 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers DM1 to kill them.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Interferon Gamma-1b, Paclitaxel, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab in Treating Patients with HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of interferon gamma-1b in combination with paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab in treating patients with HER-2 positive breast cancer. Interferon gamma-1b is a substance that can improve the body’s natural response and may interfere with the growth of tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Trastuzumab is a form of "targeted therapy" because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving interferon gamma, paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may work better than other therapies in treating HER-2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Neratinib and Paclitaxel with or without Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab before Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effect and best dose of neratinib and to see how well it works with paclitaxel and with or without pertuzumab and trastuzumab before combination chemotherapy in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Neratinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with pertuzumab and trastuzumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving neratinib, pertuzumab, trastuzumab, paclitaxel and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Trastuzumab, Neratinib, Loperamide Hydrochloride, and Crofelemer in Reducing Severity of Diarrhea in Patients with Stage II-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well trastuzumab, neratinib, loperamide hydrochloride, and crofelemer work in reducing severity of diarrhea in patients with stage II-IIIC breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Neratinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Loperamide hydrochloride and crofelemer may reduce the severity of diarrhea. Giving trastuzumab, neratinib, loperamide hydrochloride, and crofelemer may work better in treating patients with stage II-IIIC breast cancer.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Copper Cu 64-DOTA-Trastuzumab PET Imaging in Predicting Response to Treatment with Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab before Surgery in Patients with Locally Advanced HER2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well copper Cu 64-DOTA-trastuzumab positron emission tomography (PET) works in predicting response to treatment with trastuzumab and pertuzumab before surgery in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Diagnostic procedures, such as copper Cu 64 DOTA-trastuzumab PET, may help predict a patient’s response to trastuzumab and pertuzumab before surgery in patients with locally advanced HER2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California