Clinical Trials Using Trastuzumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Trastuzumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 57

  • FASN Inhibitor TVB-2640, Paclitaxel, and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well FASN inhibitor TVB-2640, paclitaxel, and trastuzumab work in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. FASN inhibitor TVB-2640 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving FASN inhibitor TVB-2640, paclitaxel, and trastuzumab may work better in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Ribociclib with Trastuzumab or Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the best dose of ribociclib with trastuzumab or trastuzumab emtansine and to see how well they work in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes or other places in the body and is human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive. Ribociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with trastuzumab may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trastuzumab emtansine is a monoclonal antibody, called trastuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug called emtansine. Trastuzumab attaches to HER2-positive tumor cells in a targeted way and delivers emtansine to kill them. Giving ribociclib with trastuzumab emtansine or trastuzumab may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Cyclophosphamide, Paclitaxel, and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with Stage I-II HER2 / neu Positive Breast Cancer after Surgery

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, and trastuzumab work when given after surgery in treating patients with stage I-II human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2 / neu) positive breast cancer (confined to the breast or the breast and lymph nodes under the arm). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, and trastuzumab after surgery may help prevent the cancer from coming back.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study Evaluating Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Therapeutic Activity of RO6874281 as a Single Agent (Part A) or in Combination With Trastuzumab or Cetuximab (Part B or C)

    This first-in-human, open-label, multicenter, Phase Ia / Ib, adaptive, multiple ascending-dose study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary anti-tumor activity of RO6874281 as a single agent (Part A) or in combination with trastuzumab or cetuximab (Part B or C).
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study of LY2835219 (Abemaciclib) in Combination With Therapies for Breast Cancer That Has Spread

    This study evaluates the safety of abemaciclib in combination therapies (letrozole, anastrozole, tamoxifen, exemestane, exemestane plus everolimus, trastuzumab, LY3023414 plus fulvestrant, pertuzumab plus trastuzumab with loperamide) for breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.
    Location: 4 locations

  • PI3K Inhibitor GDC-0084 and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    This phase II trial studies how well PI3K inhibitor GDC-0084 in combination with trastuzumab works in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that has spread to the brain. PI3K inhibitor GDC-0084 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with trastuzumab may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving PI3K inhibitor GDC-0084 and trastuzumab may work better in treating patients with breast cancer compared to PI3K inhibitor GDC-0084 alone.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Atezolizumab, Pertuzumab, and High-Dose Trastuzumab in Treating Participants with Her2-Positive Breast Cancer with Central Nervous System Metastases

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab works when given together with pertuzumab and high-dose trastuzumab in treating participants with HER2-positive breast cancer that have spread to the central nervous system from other parts of the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, pertuzumab and trastuzumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, may induce changes in body’s immune system, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 2 locations

  • FATE-NK100 as Monotherapy and in Combination With Monoclonal Antibody in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is a Phase 1, single-dose, open-label, dose-escalation study. The study will be conducted in three parts (i.e. regimens) in an outpatient setting as follows: - Regimen A: FATE-NK100 as a monotherapy in subjects with advanced solid tumor malignancies. - Regimen B: FATE-NK100 in combination with trastuzumab in subjects with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2+) advanced breast cancer, HER2+ advanced gastric cancer or other advanced HER2+ solid tumors. - Regimen C: FATE-NK100 in combination with cetuximab in subjects with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) or head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC), or other epidermal growth factor receptor 1 positive (EGFR1+) advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Palbociclib, Letrozole, and Trastuzumab before Surgery in Treating Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive and HER2 Positive Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well palbociclib, letrozole, and trastuzumab work before surgery in treating patients with estrogen receptor (ER) positive and HER2 positive stage II-III breast cancer. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs, such as letrozole, may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving palbociclib, letrozole, and trastuzumab before surgery may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Direct Tumor Microinjection and FDG-PET in Testing Drug Sensitivity in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Stage IV Breast Cancer

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of direct tumor microinjection and fludeoxyglucose F-18 positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in testing drug sensitivity in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or stage IV breast cancer that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Injecting tiny amounts of anti-cancer drugs directly into tumors on the skin or in lymph nodes and diagnostic procedures, such as FDG-PET, may help to show which drugs work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or breast cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • HER2 Directed Dendritic Cell Vaccine, Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, and Chemotherapy in Treating Participants with Stage II-III HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well a HER2 directed dendritic cell vaccine, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and chemotherapy work in treating participants with stage II-III HER-2 positive breast cancer. Dendritic cells are immune cells that can tell the immune system to fight infection. Vaccines made from a person's dendritic cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express HER2. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving a HER2 directed dendritic cell vaccine, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and chemotherapy may work better in participants with HER-2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • MCLA-128 With Trastuzumab / Chemotherapy in HER2+ and With Endocrine Therapy in ER+ and Low HER2 Breast Cancer

    A Phase 2, open-label, multicenter international study will be performed to evaluate the efficacy of MCLA-128-based combinations. Three combination treatments will be evaluated, two in Cohort 1 and one in Cohort 2. MCLA-128 is given in combinations in two metastatic breast cancer (MBC) populations, HER2-positive / amplified (Cohort 1) and Estrogen Receptor-positive / low HER2 expression (Cohort2). Two combinations treatments will be evaluated in Cohort 1, the doublet and triplet. Initially MCLA-128 is given in combination with trastuzumab in the doublet. After the safety of the doublet has been assessed in 4-6 patients, MCLA-128 is given in combination with trastuzumab and vinorelbine in the triplet, in parallel to the efficacy expansion of the doublet. The doublet and triplet combinations are both evaluated in two steps with an initial safety run-in followed by a cohort efficacy expansion. In total up to 40 patients evaluable for efficacy are included in both the doublet and triplet. In Cohort 2 MCLA-128 is administered in combination with the same previous endocrine therapy on which progressive disease is radiologically documented. A total of up to 40 patients evaluable for efficacy are included in the Cohort 2.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, Tocilizumab in Treating Participants with Metastatic or Unresectable HER2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of trastuzumab, pertuzumab and tocilizumab in treating participants with HER2 positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies such as trastuzumab, pertuzumab and tocilizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Atezolizumab, Paclitaxel, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Breast Cancer That Is Locally Recurrent, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase IIa trial studies the side effects of atezolizumab when given together with paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab and to see how well it works in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that has come back at or near the same place as the original (primary) tumor, has spread to other places in the body, or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab, paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may work better in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Interferon Gamma-1b, Paclitaxel, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab in Treating Patients with HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of interferon gamma-1b in combination with paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab in treating patients with HER-2 positive breast cancer. Interferon gamma-1b is a substance that can improve the body’s natural response and may interfere with the growth of tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving interferon gamma, paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may work better in treating HER-2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Neratinib and Paclitaxel with or without Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab before Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effect and best dose of neratinib and to see how well it works with paclitaxel and with or without pertuzumab and trastuzumab before combination chemotherapy in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Neratinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab and trastuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving neratinib, pertuzumab, trastuzumab, paclitaxel and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Trastuzumab, Neratinib, Loperamide Hydrochloride, and Crofelemer in Reducing Severity of Diarrhea in Patients with Stage II-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well trastuzumab, neratinib, loperamide hydrochloride, and crofelemer work in reducing severity of diarrhea in patients with stage II-IIIC breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Neratinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Loperamide hydrochloride and crofelemer may reduce the severity of diarrhea. Giving trastuzumab, neratinib, loperamide hydrochloride, and crofelemer may work better in treating patients with stage II-IIIC breast cancer.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Copper Cu 64-DOTA-Trastuzumab PET Imaging in Predicting Response to Treatment with Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab before Surgery in Patients with Locally Advanced HER2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well copper Cu 64-DOTA-trastuzumab positron emission tomography (PET) works in predicting response to treatment with trastuzumab and pertuzumab before surgery in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive breast cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Diagnostic procedures, such as copper Cu 64 DOTA-trastuzumab PET, may help predict a patient’s response to trastuzumab and pertuzumab before surgery in patients with locally advanced HER2 positive breast cancer.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Sargramostim and Trastuzumab in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent Ependymoma

    This phase I clinical trial studies the side effects and best dose of trastuzumab when given together with sargramostim in treating younger patients with ependymoma that have returned after a period of improvement. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Colony-stimulating factors, such as sargramostim, may increase the production of blood cells and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving trastuzumab with sargramostim may work better in treating younger patients with recurrent ependymoma.
    Location: Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado

  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel with Pertuzumab and Trastuzumab or Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well carboplatin and paclitaxel given in combination with pertuzumab and trastuzumab or bevacizumab work in treating patients with breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pertuzumab, trastuzumab and bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving carboplatin and paclitaxel together with pertuzumab and trastuzumab or bevacizumab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: UC Irvine Health / Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Orange, California

  • Personalized Antibodies in Treating Patients with Metastatic Stomach or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    This pilot phase II trial studies personalized antibodies in treating patients with stomach or gastroesophageal junction cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Testing tumor tissue for gene mutations and protein expression patterns and using drugs that target the specific profile of the tumor, may work better than standard chemotherapy in treating patients with stomach or gastroesophageal junction cancer.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Chemotherapy before Surgery and Tissue Sample Collection in Patients with Stage IIA-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This randomized pilot clinical trial studies chemotherapy before surgery and tissue sample collection in patients with stage IIA-IIIC breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells o grow and spread. Giving doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel and trastuzumab may kill more tumor cells. Collecting and storing samples of tissue from patients with breast cancer to study in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about how well patients will respond to treatment.
    Location: Montefiore Medical Center-Weiler Hospital, Bronx, New York

  • Capecitabine, Cyclophosphamide, Lapatinib Ditosylate, and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well capecitabine, cyclophosphamide, lapatinib ditosylate, and trastuzumab work in treating patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving capecitabine and cyclophosphamide daily may kill more tumor cells. Lapatinib ditosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of the tumor to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Giving capecitabine, cyclophosphamide, lapatinib ditosylate, and trastuzumab together may be an effective treatment for breast cancer.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Trastuzumab in Treating Leptomeningeal Metastases in Patients with HER2-Positive Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of trastuzumab and to see how well it works in treating cancer that has spread to the thin layers of tissue that cover and protect the brain and spinal cord (meninges) in patients with certain nervous system tumors or patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cyclophosphamide and Vaccine Therapy with or without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with Stage IV Breast Cancer

    This trial studies cyclophosphamide and vaccine therapy with or without trastuzumab in treating patients with stage IV breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Vaccines made from gene-modified tumor cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Immunotherapy with trastuzumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether cyclophosphamide and vaccine therapy is more effective when given together with or without trastuzumab in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland