Clinical Trials Using Prednisone

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Prednisone. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-100 of 110

  • Olaparib, Cabazitaxel, Carboplatin, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well olaparib, cabazitaxel, carboplatin, and prednisone work in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cabazitaxel, carboplatin, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving olaparib, cabazitaxel, carboplatin, and prednisone may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Venetoclax, Ibrutinib, Prednisone, Obinutuzumab, and Revlimid (ViPOR) in Relapsed / Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    Background: B-cell lymphoma is a cancer of white blood cells found in the lymph nodes. It affects the system that fights infections and disease. Researchers want to learn how certain drugs work together to treat B-cell lymphomas. The drugs are venetoclax, ibrutinib, prednisone, obinutuzumab, and lenalidomide (ViPOR). Objective: To study the safety of ViPOR for people with B-cell lymphoma. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with B-cell lymphoma whose cancer has returned or not improved after treatment Design: Participants will be screened with: - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood, urine, and heart tests - Tissue sample from previous procedure - Imaging scans - Registration for counseling on the risks of lenalidomide. They must get counseling at least every 28 days. Participants will have a bone marrow aspiration before treatment. Participants may have tumor samples taken. Participants will get ViPOR in 21-day cycles. For up to 6 cycles: - Participants will get one drug by IV on days 1 and 2. - Participants will take the other four drugs by mouth on most days. After their first dose of venetoclax, they will stay in the clinic for at least 8 hours and return the next day for monitoring. They may be admitted for more drugs or monitoring. Participants will keep a drug diary. Participants will have a physical exam and blood and urine tests at least once per cycle. They will have scans 4 times over 6 cycles. Participants will have a visit about 1 month after their last dose of study drug. They will then have visits every few months for 3 years, and once a year for years 4 and 5. Visits include a physical exam, blood tests, and scans.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Selinexor and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Advanced B Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of selinexor and how well it works when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) or newly diagnosed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Selinexor may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving selinexor and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Prednisone, Abiraterone, Cabazitaxel, and Enzalutamide in Treating Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cabazitaxel when given together with prednisone, abiraterone, and enzalutamide in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Prednisone is an orally given steroid drug that helps in blocking some side effects of abiraterone. Abiraterone may lower the level of testosterone and enzalutamide may block the action of testosterone and these actions will prevent the growth of prostate cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cabazitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving prednisone, abiraterone, cabazitaxel, and enzalutamide may work better in treating patients with castration-resistant cancer.
    Location: University of Alabama at Birmingham Cancer Center, Birmingham, Alabama

  • Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin (DA-EPOCH) works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Androgen Deprivation Therapy, Pembrolizumab, and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with or without TLR9 Agonist SD-101 in Treating Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well androgen deprivation therapy, pembrolizumab, and stereotactic body radiation therapy with or without TLR9 agonist SD-101 in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Androgen can cause the growth of tumor cells. Androgen deprivation therapy, such as leuprolide acetate, prednisone, and abiraterone acetate may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Colony-stimulating factors, such as TLR9 agonist SD-101, may increase the production of blood cells. It is not yet known whether giving androgen deprivation therapy, pembrolizumab, and stereotactic body radiation therapy with or without TLR9 agonist SD-101 may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Apalutamide with or without Abiraterone Acetate, Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analog, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with High-Risk Prostate Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well apalutamide works with or without abiraterone acetate, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, and prednisone in treating patients with high-risk prostate cancer undergoing surgery. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Hormone therapy using apalutamide, abiraterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRH agonist) may fight prostate cancer by lowering the levels of androgen the body makes. Prednisone may either kill the tumor cells or stop them from dividing. Giving apalutamide with or without abiraterone acetate, GnRH agonist and prednisone may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Lenalidomide Combined With Modified DA-EPOCH and Rituximab (EPOCH-R2) in Primary Effusion Lymphoma or KSHV-associated Large Cell Lymphoma

    Background: Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare disease with no standard treatment. Researchers want to see if a drug called lenalidomide along with common chemotherapy drugs may be effective in treating PEL. Objective: To test a new treatment for PEL. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with PEL. Design: Participants will be screened with blood tests, imaging studies, a physical exam, and other tests. Participants will have tests to evaluate their disease. These may include: Blood tests Scans Lumbar puncture. Fluid around the spinal cord will be removed with a needle. Bone marrow removed with a needle and studied Samples of skin or lymph nodes removed Fluid removed from around organs Lung and eye tests Tubes with cameras taking pictures of airways or digestive tract Participants will take lenalidomide pills for 10 days. They will keep a pill diary. Participants will have a catheter (small tube) placed in the large vein in the arm or chest. Participants will get DA-EPOCH-R as intravenous infusions by catheter over several days. This will be repeated in 21-day cycles. Most participants will have 6 cycles. Participants will get the drug filgrastim by injection under the skin. They will get the drug methotrexate injected into the spinal fluid. During the study, participants will have the following tests done at least once: Medical history Physical exam Blood, urine, and stool tests Lesions photographed and measured Lumbar puncture Participants will have follow-up visits for 5 years. They will repeat the screening tests plus have urine and stool tested. Participants may be contacted later by phone to see how they are doing.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy as Frontline Therapy in Treating Patients with B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy work as frontline therapy in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, dexamethasone, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, methotrexate, and prednisone work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving blinatumomab and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with B acute lymphoblastic leukemia than chemotherapy alone.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Abiraterone Acetate, Niclosamide, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well abiraterone acetate, niclosamide, and prednisone work in treating patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cells. Hormone therapy using abiraterone acetate may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of androgen the body makes. Niclosamide is a drug that may block another signal that can cause prostate cancer cell growth. Prednisone is a drug that can help lessen inflammation. Giving abiraterone acetate, niclosamide, and prednisone may be a better treatment for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • A Study of Brentuximab Vedotin, Rituximab, and Dose Attenuated CHP in Elderly Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL)

    This is a study incorporating brentuximab vedotin and dose attenuated rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone (R-CHP) into initial therapy for elderly patients with DLBCL. Vincristine will be omitted from the standard R-CHOP regimen given the overlapping toxicities with brentuximab vedotin.
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • Rituximab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with CD20 Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma in Malawi

    This pilot phase I / II trial studies side effects of rituximab and combination chemotherapy in treating patients with CD20 positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma living in Malawi. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving rituximab and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Study of Palifermin (Kepivance) in Persons Undergoing Unrelated Donor Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Background: - In allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), stem cells are taken from a donor and given to a recipient. Sometimes the recipient s immune system destroys the donor s cells. Or donor immune cells attack the recipient s tissues, called graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This is less likely when the recipient and donor have similar human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Researchers want to see if the drug palifermin improves the results of allogeneic SCT from HLA-matched unrelated donors. Objective: - To see if high doses of palifermin before chemotherapy are safe, prevent chronic GVHD, and improve immune function after transplant. Eligibility: - Adults 18 years of age or older with blood or bone marrow cancer with no HLA-matched sibling, but with a possible HLA-matched donor. Design: - Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, and blood and urine tests. They will have scans and heart and lung exams. - Before transplant, participants will: - Have many tests and exams. These include blood tests throughout the study and bone marrow biopsy. - Get a central line catheter if they do not have one. - Have 1-3 rounds of chemotherapy. - Take more tests to make sure they can have the transplant, including medical history, physical exam, and CT scan. - Get palifermin by IV and more chemotherapy. They will get other drugs, some they will take for 6 months. - Participants will get the SCT. - After transplant, participants will: - Be hospitalized at least 3-4 weeks. - Have tests for GVHD at 60 days and 6 months. These include mouth and skin photos and biopsies. - Stay near D.C. for 3 months. - Visit NIH 5 times the first 2 years, then yearly. They may have scans and biopsies.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Dose Adjusted EPOCH Regimen in Combination with Ofatumumab or Rituximab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well a dose adjusted regimen consisting of etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (EPOCH) works in combination with ofatumumab or rituximab in treating patients with Burkitt lymphoma that is newly diagnosed, or has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed), or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory) or relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ofatumumab and rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) together with monoclonal antibody therapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Ponatinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy and ponatinib hydrochloride work in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Ponatinib hydrochloride may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy and ponatinib hydrochloride may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients with Previously Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin and to see how well it works when given together with combination chemotherapy in treating older patients with previously untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called N-acetyl-gamma-calicheamicin dimethyl hydrazide (CalichDMH). Inotuzumab attaches to CD22 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers CalichDMH to kill them. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving inotuzumab ozogamicin together with combination chemotherapy may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Nelarabine in Treating Patients with T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well combination chemotherapy and nelarabine work in treating patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, dexamethasone, methotrexate, cytarabine, mercaptopurine, prednisone, pegaspargase, nelarabine, and venetoclax work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • EPOCH and Rituximab to Treat Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma in Patients With HIV Infection

    Background: - HIV-infected patients have a weakened immune system, and chemotherapy, which is used to treat lymphoma, probably causes further damage to the immune system. - Limiting the amount of immune damage due to chemotherapy might decrease the number of infections and the risk of developing cancer in the future in HIV-infected patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Objectives: - To determine whether reducing the total amount of chemotherapy using a specific combination of drugs called EPOCH-R (etoposide, doxorubicin, vincristine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab) will rid the body of lymphoma quickly while decreasing the risk of infections and future cancers. - To determine whether the lymphoma will remain undetectable for at least one year if treatment is stopped one cycle after the patient enters remission. Eligibility: -Patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and HIV infection 4 years of age and older who have not been treated previously with rituximab or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Design: - Patients receive EPOCH-R in 3-week treatment cycles for at least three and no more than six cycles. - The lymphoma is evaluated using CT and PET scans at the end of treatment cycles 2 and 3. A bone marrow biopsy is repeated after cycle 2 if a biopsy was initially positive on screening for participation in the study. - Anti-HIV therapy is stopped before chemotherapy begins and is restarted when EPOCH-R treatment ends. - Patients are monitored for treatment response with blood tests and imaging scans at baseline, when treatment ends, 2 months after treatment ends and then every 3 to 6 months for a total of 24 months following chemotherapy.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Treatment and Natural History Study of Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

    This study will evaluate the response and long-term effects of alpha-interferon in patients with lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LYG). The disease causes proliferation of destructive cells involving the lungs, skin, kidneys, and central nervous system. Patients ages 12 and older who have LYG and who are not pregnant or breast feeding may be eligible for this study. Alpha interferon or chemotherapy, or both, will be used. Alpha interferon is a protein the body naturally produces. If patients have grade 3 disease, they will usually receive EPOCH-rituximab (EPOCH-R) chemotherapy (each letter representing a drug). If patients have grade 1 or 2 disease, the will usually receive alpha interferon. If patients have LYG after receiving alpha interferon and / or EPOCH-R, they may receive rituximab alone or with alpha interferon. Rituximab is an antibody, binding to a specific molecule (CD20) present on most B-cell lymphomas. Doses of several drugs in EPOCH-R may be increased if patients tolerated them in the previous cycle. If patients respond to EPOCH-R but still have low grade LYG, they may receive alpha interferon. Researchers will also try to obtain a biopsy of patients lesions, to help in understanding the disease. Patients self-administer alpha interferon by injection under the skin three times weekly. They will visit the clinic every 2 to 12 weeks for follow-up. Patients will receive alpha interferon for 1 year after LYG goes away, depending on response. EPOCH-R has these drugs: rituximab by vein on Day 1; prednisone by mouth on Days 1 to 5; etoposide, doxorubicin, and vincristine as a continuous intravenous infusion on Days 1 to 5; and cyclophosphamide by intravenous injection over 1 hour on Day 5. Each cycle lasts 3 weeks: 5 days of chemotherapy and 16 days of no chemotherapy. Etoposide, doxorubicin, and vincristine are infused through a small pump worn by patients. The drugs are given over 5 days through a central intravenous catheter. There are two cycles of EPOCH-R beyond a maximum response, with six cycles minimum. To reduce harm to bone marrow, patients receive granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), self-administered by injection under the skin daily for approximately 10 days between chemotherapy cycles. If at the end of therapy, patients have a complete response, treatment will stop. If there is residual low grade disease, patients may receive alpha interferon. Alpha interferon can have flu-like side effects of headache, fever, chills, and body aches. EPOCH-R drugs can cause gastrointestinal problems, hair loss, and weakness. G-CSF can cause bone pain, body aches, and hair thinning. Chemotherapy can cause some patients to develop leukemia. This study may or may not have a direct benefit for participants. It is not certain whether the new therapy will help decrease tumors. However, knowledge gained may improve the understanding of and treatment for LYG. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Dose-Adjusted EPOCH Chemotherapy and Rituximab (CD20+) in Previously Untreated Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    5-Drug Combination Chemotherapy with Hematologic Toxicity Attenuation. EPOCH: Etoposide, VP-16, NSC-141540; Prednisone, PRED, NSC-10023; Vincristine, VCR, NSC-67574; Cyclophosphamide, CTX, NSC-26271; Doxorubicin, DOX, NSC-123127; with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (Amgen), G-CSF, NSC-614629.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Phase Ib Study to Assess Safety and Preliminary Efficacy of Tafasitamab or Tafasitamab Plus Lenalidomide in Addition to R-CHOP in Patients With Newly Diagnosed DLBCL

    This is an open-label, randomized, multicentre study to evaluate safety and preliminary efficacy of the human anti-CD19 antibody Tafasitamab in addition to R-CHOP (Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristin, Prednison) or Tafasitamab and Lenalidomide in addition to R-CHOP in adult patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL).
    Location: 3 locations

  • Infliximab and Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy in Treating Patients with Steroid-Refractory Pneumonitis

    This phase II trial studies how well infliximab and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy work in treating patients with pneumonitis that does not respond to steroid treatment. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies such as, infliximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy may improve pneumonitis. It is not yet known whether giving infliximab and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy will work better in treating patients with pneumonitis.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Testing the Addition of an Anti-cancer Drug, Lenalidomide, to the Usual Combination Chemotherapy Treatment (“EPOCH”) for Adult T-Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma (ATL)

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of lenalidomide when given together with usual combination chemotherapy (etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate [Oncovin], cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride [hydroxydaunorubicin hydrochloride], or "EPOCH") in treating adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma. Lenalidomide may help shrink or slow the growth of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Anti-inflammatory drugs such as prednisone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving lenalidomide and the usual combination chemotherapy may work better in treating adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma compared to the usual combination chemotherapy alone.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • A Study of Daratumumab and Dose-Adjusted EPOCH in Plasmablastic Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies how well daratumumab in combination with dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DA-EPOCH) works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage I-IV plasmablastic lymphoma. Plasmablastic lymphoma cells have high levels of a protein called CD38. Daratumumab is a monoclonal antibody that specifically targets CD38 expressing cells, and may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer and interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving daratumumab may enhance the effectiveness of a standard chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH) in patients with plasmablastic lymphoma.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Polatuzumab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Untreated Aggressive Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of polatuzumab vedotin when given with combination chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with untreated large B-cell lymphoma that grows and spreads quickly and has severe symptoms (aggressive). Polatuzumab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, polatuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Polatuzumab attaches to CD79B positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy such as etoposide, prednisone, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving polatuzumab vedotin in addition to etoposide, prednisone, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab may help treat patients with aggressive large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington