Clinical Trials to Treat Adult Brain Tumors

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Trials 1-25 of 42
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  • Dose-Escalated Photon IMRT or Proton Beam Radiation Therapy versus Standard-Dose Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well dose-escalated photon intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton beam radiation therapy works compared with standard-dose radiation therapy when given with temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays and other types of radiation to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs, such as temozolomide, may make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. It is not yet known whether dose-escalated photon IMRT or proton beam radiation therapy is more effective than standard-dose radiation therapy with temozolomide in treating glioblastoma.
    Location: 169 locations

  • An Investigational Immuno-therapy Study of Temozolomide Plus Radiation Therapy With Nivolumab or Placebo, for Newly Diagnosed Patients With Glioblastoma (GBM, a Malignant Brain Cancer)

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate patients with glioblastoma that is MGMT-methylated (the MGMT gene is altered by a chemical change). Patients will receive temozolomide plus radiation therapy. They will be compared to patients receiving Nivolumab in addition to temozolomide plus radiation therapy.
    Location: 22 locations

  • Vemurafenib in Treating Children and Young Adults with Recurrent or Refractory BRAFV600E or BRAF Ins T Mutant Brain Tumors

    This pilot early phase I trial tests the safety and side effects of the adult dose of vemurafenib in treating children and young adults with BRAFV600E or BRAF Ins T mutant brain tumors that have come back or do not respond to treatment. Vemurafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes that tumors with this mutation need for growth.
    Location: 20 locations

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent Malignant Glioma with a Hypermutator Phenotype

    This phase II trial studies pembrolizumab in treating patients with malignant glioma (a cancer of the brain that begins in glial cells [cells that surround and support nerve cells]) that has come back. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.
    Location: 13 locations

  • Study of IDO Inhibitor and Temozolomide for Adult Patients With Primary Malignant Brain Tumors

    In this study, investigators will conduct a phase I / II trial in recurrent (temozolomide resistant) glioma patients. The overall goal of this study is to provide a foundation for future studies with indoximod tested in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients with radiation and temozolomide, or in combination with vaccine therapies.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Phase I / II Study of IMMU-132 in Patients With Epithelial Cancers

    The primary objective is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of IMMU-132 as a single agent administered in 3-week treatment cycles for up to 8 cycles, in previously treated patients with advanced epithelial cancer.The secondary objectives are to obtain initial data concerning pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and efficacy with this dosing regimen. IMMU-132 targets the TROP-2 antigen which is expressed on a variety of cancers. The antibody, RS7, is attached to SN38, which is the active metabolite of irinotecan. This is planned as a multi-center study. In Phase II, up to 130 patients (assessable) in triple-negative breast cancer, up to 100 patients (assessable) in non-small cell and small-cell lung cancer and up to 50 patients (assessable) per other cancer types included in the protocol will be studied at the 10 mg / kg dose.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Lapatinib Ditosylate before Surgery in Treating Patients with Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well lapatinib ditosylate before surgery works in treating patients with high-grade glioma that has come back after a period of time during which the tumor could not be detected. Lapatinib ditosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 12 locations

  • Temozolomide and Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients with Recurrent Low-Grade Ependymoma

    This phase II trial studies how well temozolomide and lapatinib ditosylate work in treating patients with low-grade ependymoma that has come back (recurrent). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Lapatinib ditosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth or by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Giving temozolomide and lapatinib ditosylate together may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 6 locations

  • A Study of Ad-RTS-hIL-12 With Veledimex in Subjects With Glioblastoma or Malignant Glioma

    This research study involves an investigational product: Ad-RTS-hIL-12 given with veledimex for production of human IL-12. IL-12 is a protein that can improve the body's natural response to disease by enhancing the ability of the immune system to kill tumor cells and may interfere with blood flow to the tumor. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of a single tumor injection of Ad-RTS-hIL-12 given with oral veledimex.
    Location: 5 locations

  • A Phase 1b / 2, Multicenter, Open-label Study of ACP-196 in Subjects With Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

    A Phase 1b / 2, multicenter, open-label study designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ACP-196 in subjects with recurrent GBM who have progressed after 1 or 2 prior systemic treatment regimens.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Sirolimus and Metronomic Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent and / or Refractory Solid or Central Nervous System Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well sirolimus and continuous or frequent treatment with low doses of chemotherapy work in treating younger patients with solid or central nervous system (CNS) tumors that have come back or have not responded to previous treatment. Biological therapies, such as sirolimus, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, celecoxib, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving sirolimus together with metronomic chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for solid and CNS tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Modified T-cells in Treating Patients with Glioblastoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of modified T-cells in treating patients with glioblastoma. T-cells are a type of white blood cell that help protect the body from infection and may help fight cancer. T-cells that are genetically modified in the laboratory to target certain cells may help identify and treat glioblastoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • TORC1 / 2 Inhibitor MLN0128 and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent Glioblastoma or Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of raptor / rictor-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) (TORC1 / 2) inhibitor MLN0128 when given in combination with bevacizumab in treating patients with glioblastoma, a type of brain tumor, or a solid tumor that has spread and not responded to standard treatment. TORC1 / 2 inhibitor MLN0128 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Bevacizumab may also stop the progression of tumors by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Study of CC-122 to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, and Effectiveness for Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, or Multiple Myeloma

    The main purpose of this first in human study with CC-122 is to assess the safety and action of a new class of experimental drug (Pleiotropic Pathway Modulator) in patients with advanced tumors unresponsive to standard therapies and to determine the appropriate dosing level and regimen for later-stage clinical trials.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Melphalan, Carboplatin, Mannitol, and Sodium Thiosulfate in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Progressive CNS Embryonal or Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of melphalan when given together with carboplatin, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate, and to see how well they work in treating patients with recurrent or progressive central nervous system (CNS) embryonal or germ cell tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as melphalan and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) uses mannitol to open the blood vessels around the brain and allow cancer-killing substances to be carried directly to the brain. Sodium thiosulfate may help lessen or prevent hearing loss and toxicities in patients undergoing chemotherapy with carboplatin and BBBD. Giving melphalan together with carboplatin, mannitol, and sodium thiosulfate may be an effective treatment for recurrent or progressive CNS embryonal or germ cell tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study of Pomalidomide (CC-4047) Monotherapy for Children and Young Adults With Recurrent or Progressive Primary Brain Tumors

    A Phase 2 study that will assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of pomalidomide in children and young adults aged 1 to < 21 years with recurrent or progressive primary brain tumors. The study will consist of 4 parallel groups, one for each of the following primary brain tumor types: high-grade glioma, medulloblastoma, ependymoma and DIPG. A Simon's Optimal two-stage study design will be applied to each group.
    Location: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Brain Metastasis

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in treating patients with brain metastasis. Brain metastases are tumors that have spread to the brain from another place in the body. SRS is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • Dasatinib, Temsirolimus, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Advanced, Recurrent, or Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of dasatinib and temsirolimus when given together with cyclophosphamide in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body, have come back, or have not respond to previous treatment. Dasatinib and temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving dasatinib and temsirolimus together with cyclophosphamide may be a better treatment for advanced solid tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Akt / ERK Inhibitor ONC201 in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of Akt / ERK inhibitor ONC201 in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other anatomic sites or is no longer responding to treatment. Akt / ERK inhibitor ONC201 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Alisertib and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of alisertib when combined with fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery in treating patients with high-grade gliomas that have returned after previous treatment with radiation therapy (recurrent). Alisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cells to divide and grow. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Delivering stereotactic radiosurgery over multiple doses (fractionation) may cause more damage to tumor tissue than normal tissue while still remaining accurate. Giving alisertib together with fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Temozolomide and Targeted or Standard Brain Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well an increased dose of radiation therapy applied to a specific part of the brain works compared to standard radiation therapy when given with temozolomide in treating patients with a newly diagnosed brain tumor, such as glioblastoma multiforme. The brain contains cells called neural progenitor cells (NPC) that may be important in the brain’s response to injury but may also contribute to tumor recurrence. Subventricular zone radiation therapy targeting these cells may improve the local control and delay the brain tumor from coming back. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether subventricular zone radiation therapy and temozolomide are more effective than standard radiation therapy and temozolomide in treating patients with glioblastoma multiforme.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Surgery and Second-Course Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent Ependymoma

    This phase II trial studies how well surgery and second-course radiation therapy work in treating younger patients with ependymoma that has returned. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Second-course radiation therapy delivers a higher dose of radiation to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving second-course radiation therapy after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Everolimus With or Without Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Newly-Diagnosed Low-Grade Gliomas

    This phase II trial compares how well everolimus alone or everolimus and temozolomide work in treating patients with newly-diagnosed low-grade gliomas. Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work to stop the growth of tumor cells by killing the cells. It is not yet known whether everolimus alone works better than everolimus and temozolomide in treating low-grade gliomas.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Liposomal Rhenium Re 186 in Treating Patients with Recurrent Glioma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of liposomal rhenium Re 186 and to see how well it works in treating patients with glioma that has come back. Liposomal rhenium Re 186 consists of radioactive Re 186 placed inside of a nanoliposome. The nanoliposomes help carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. The radioisotope releases radiation, which may directly kill tumor cells.
    Location: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • Low-Dose Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well low-dose whole-brain radiation therapy and temozolomide work in treating patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Low-dose whole-brain radiation therapy may kill the microscopic tumor cells which are outside of the area of the brain that receives partial brain radiation therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work to stop the growth of tumor cells by killing the cells. Giving low-dose whole-brain radiation therapy with temozolomide may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: University of Maryland / Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland


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