Treatment Clinical Trials for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for adult acute myeloid leukemia treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-39 of 39

  • Study of IV CBL0137 in Previously Treated Hematological Subjects

    This clinical trial is a Phase 1, open-label, sequential-group, dose-escalation (Part 1) and cohort-expansion study (Part 2) evaluating the safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and antitumor activity of CBL0137. The study will evaluate CBL0137 administered IV weekly on Days 1 and 8 of repeated 21 day treatment cycles in subjects with previously treated hematological malignancies.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Low-Dose Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies how well low-dose daunorubicin hydrochloride works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back or has not responded to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, Kansas

  • Universal Donor Natural Killer Cells and ALT-803 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Blood Cancer, Colon / Rectal Cancer, or Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose of universal donor natural killer cells when given together with superagonist interleukin-15:interleukin-15 receptor alphaSu / Fc fusion complex ALT-803 (ALT-803) in treating patients with blood cancer, colon / rectal cancer, or soft tissue sarcoma that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Natural killer cells are a type of white blood cell that may kill tumor cells. ALT-803 may enhance natural killer cell survival and enable them to increase in number after infusion. Giving natural killer cells and ALT-803 may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Personalized NK Cell Therapy after Chemotherapy and Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Leukemia, Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well personalized natural killer (NK) cell therapy works after chemotherapy and umbilical cord blood transplant in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, leukemia, lymphoma or multiple myeloma. This clinical trial will test cord blood (CB) selection for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C1 / x recipients based on HLA-killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) typing, and adoptive therapy with CB-derived NK cells for HLA-C2 / C2 patients. Natural killer cells may kill tumor cells that remain in the body after chemotherapy treatment and lessen the risk of graft versus host disease after cord blood transplant.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Abbreviated Mycophenolate Mofetil and Sargramostim after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High Risk or Recurrent Hematological Malignancies

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well a shortened course of treatment with mycophenolate mofetil after stem cell transplant works when given with sargramostim in treating patients with a cancer that affects the blood or bone marrow (hematological malignancy), and is at high risk for returning or came back after previous treatment (recurrent). Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a condition that may occur after transplant, in which the stem cells that are transplanted from a donor (the "graft") attack the normal cells of the patient (the “host”). Mycophenolate mofetil is used to help prevent GVHD after transplants. Giving mycophenolate mofetil for a shorter period of time may help the transplanted cells engraft with the patient's body more quickly, which may help the patient recover after the transplant. After transplants, colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim, are also given to help keep the bone marrow working to fight infections until it can recover from the transplant. Sargramostim may be a more effective treatment for supporting the bone marrow function than standard treatment with filgrastim. It is not yet known whether giving abbreviated treatment with mycophenolate mofetil and sargramostim is more effective than longer treatment given with filgrastim in treating patients with high risk or recurrent hematological malignancies after transplant.
    Location: Virginia Commonwealth University / Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia

  • Dose Escalation of OXi4503 as Single Agent and Combination With Cytarabine w / Subsequent Ph 2 Cohorts for AML and MDS

    Phase 1 will investigate maximum tolerated dose of OXi4503 as a single agent and in combination with intermediate-dose cytarabine in subjects with relapsed / refractory AML or MDS. Phase 2 will investigate overall response rate of OXi4503 in combination with intermediate-dose cytarabine in 1) subjects with MDS after failure of 1 prior hypomethylating agent (Arm A) and 2) subjects with relapsed and refractory AML after treatment failure of up to 1 prior chemotherapy regimen (Arm B).
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    This pilot clinical trial studies the feasibility of choosing treatment based on a high throughput ex vivo drug sensitivity assay in combination with mutation analysis for patients with acute leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. A high throughput screening assay tests many different drugs individually or in combination that kill leukemia cells in tiny chambers at the same time. High throughput drug sensitivity assay and mutation analysis may help guide the choice most effective for an individual’s acute leukemia.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • A Phase Ib / II Multicenter Open-label Study of BGB324 in Patients With AML or MDS

    A Phase Ib / II multicentre open label study of BGb324 as a single agent in patients with AML or MDS or in a combination with cytarabine and decitabine in AML patients. BGB324 is a potent selective small molecule inhibitor of Axl, a surface membrane protein kinase receptor which is overexpressed in up to half of AML cases.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Crenolanib Maintenance Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in FLT3-positive Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    This is a single-arm, Phase II study of crenolanib as maintenance in AML patients with FLT3 mutations who have achieved complete remission (CR) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Oral crenolanib will be administered daily post-transplant for up to two years.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Intensity Modulated Total Marrow Irradiation, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Melphalan in Treating Patients with Relapsed Hematologic Cancers Undergoing a Second or above Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of intensity modulated total marrow irradiation (IMTMI) when given together with fludarabine phosphate and melphalan in treating patients with cancers of the blood (hematologic) that have returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) undergoing a second or above donor stem cell transplant. IMTMI is a type of radiation therapy to the bone marrow that may be less toxic and may also reduce the chances of cancer to return. Giving fludarabine phosphate, melphalan, and IMTMI before a donor stem cell transplant may help stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • CD34+ Stem Cell Selection in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Younger Patients with Malignant Disease Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies cluster of differentiation 34 positive (CD34+) stem cell selection in preventing graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) in younger patients with malignant disease undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Selected CD34+ stem cell may help stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells and prevent GVHD.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Reduced-Intensity Conditioning before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies reduced-intensity conditioning before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies. Giving low-doses of chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Giving an infusion of the donor’s T cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) before the transplant may help increase this effect.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Low-Dose Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and the best way to give low-dose donor bone marrow transplant (BMT) and to see how well it works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving low-doses of chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's bone marrow cells. When the healthy stem cells from a related or unrelated donor, that do not exactly match the patient's blood, are infused into the patient they may help patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) after transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Efficacy Study on the Strategy of HSV-Tk Engineering Donor Lymphocytes to Treat Patients With High Risk Acute Leukemia

    The main objective of this randomized trial is to compare disease-free survival (DFS) in high risk leukemia patients who underwent haploidentical HCT followed by an add back strategy of HSV-Tk donor lymphocytes or standard haploidentical HCT
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov