Treatment Clinical Trials for Breast Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for breast cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 484
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  • Weight Loss Interventions in Treating Overweight and Obese Women with a Higher Risk for Breast Cancer Recurrence

    This randomized phase III trial studies weight loss interventions in treating overweight and obese women with a higher risk for breast cancer that comes back (recurrence). Many studies have shown that women who are overweight or obese when diagnosed with breast cancer appear to have a higher risk of cancer recurrence. This study aims to test whether overweight or obese women who take part in a weight loss program after being diagnosed with breast cancer have a lower rate of cancer recurrence as compared to women who do not take part in the program.
    Location: 1284 locations

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients with Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.
    Location: 1175 locations

  • Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Paclitaxel with or without Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel with or without carboplatin work in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide is more effective when followed by paclitaxel alone or paclitaxel and carboplatin in treating triple-negative breast cancer.
    Location: 1132 locations

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Rare Tumors

    This clinical trial studies nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare tumors. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial enrolls participants for the following cohorts based on condition: 1. Epithelial tumors of nasal cavity, sinuses, nasopharynx: A) Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx and trachea (excluding laryngeal, nasopharyngeal cancer [NPC], and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck [SCCHN]) B) Adenocarcinoma and variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx. 2. Epithelial tumors of major salivary glands 3. Salivary gland type tumors of head and neck, lip, esophagus, stomach, trachea and lung, breast and other location 4. Undifferentiated carcinoma of gastrointestinal (GI) tract 5. Adenocarcinoma with variants of small intestine 6. Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of GI tract (stomach small intestine, colon, rectum, pancreas) 7. Fibromixoma and low grade mucinous adenocarcinoma (pseudomixoma peritonei) of the appendix and ovary 8. Rare pancreatic tumors including acinar cell carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or serous cystadenocarcinoma 9. Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma 10. Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and bile duct tumors 11. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of lung 12. Bronchoalveolar carcinoma lung. This condition is now also referred to as adenocarcinoma in situ, minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma, or invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma. 13. Non-epithelial tumors of the ovary: A) Germ cell tumor of ovary B) Mullerian mixed tumor and adenosarcoma 14. Trophoblastic tumor: A) Choriocarcinoma 15. Transitional cell carcinoma other than that of the renal, pelvis, ureter, or bladder 16. Cell tumor of the testes and extragonadal germ tumors: A) Seminoma and testicular sex cord cancer B) Non-seminomatous tumor C) Teratoma with malignant transformation 17. Epithelial tumors of penis - squamous adenocarcinoma cell carcinoma with variants of penis 18. Squamous cell carcinoma variants of the genitourinary (GU) system 19. Spindle cell carcinoma of kidney, pelvis, ureter 20. Adenocarcinoma with variants of GU system (excluding prostate cancer) 21. Odontogenic malignant tumors 22. Endocrine carcinoma of pancreas and digestive tract 23. Neuroendocrine carcinoma including carcinoid of the lung 24. Pheochromocytoma, malignant 25. Paraganglioma 26. Carcinomas of pituitary gland, thyroid gland parathyroid gland and adrenal cortex 27. Desmoid tumors 28. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors and NF1-related tumors 29. Malignant giant cell tumors 30. Chordoma 31. Adrenal cortical tumors 32. Tumor of unknown primary (Cancer of Unknown Primary; CuP) 33. Not Otherwise Categorized (NOC) Rare Tumors [To obtain permission to enroll in the NOC cohort, contact: S1609SC@swog.org] 34. Adenoid cystic carcinoma 35. Vulvar cancer 36. MetaPLASTIC carcinoma (of the breast) 37. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)
    Location: 847 locations

  • Platinum Based Chemotherapy or Capecitabine in Treating Patients with Residual Triple-Negative Basal-Like Breast Cancer following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well cisplatin or carboplatin (platinum based chemotherapy) works compared to capecitabine in treating patients with remaining (residual) basal-like triple-negative breast cancer following chemotherapy after surgery (neoadjuvant). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, carboplatin and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether cisplatin or carboplatin is more effective than capecitabine in treating patients with residual triple negative basal-like breast cancer.
    Location: 874 locations

  • Cisplatin with or without Veliparib in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Triple-Negative and / or BRCA Mutation-Associated Breast Cancer with or without Brain Metastases

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well cisplatin works with or without veliparib in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer and / or BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer that has come back or has or has not spread to the brain. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known if cisplatin is more effective with or without veliparib in treating patients with triple-negative and / or BRCA mutation-associated breast cancer.
    Location: 765 locations

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 714 locations

  • Standard or Comprehensive Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer Previously Treated with Chemotherapy and Surgery

    This randomized phase III trial studies radiation therapy to the breast, chest wall and lymph nodes (comprehensive) compared to standard radiation therapy to the breast in treating patients with early-stage breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy and surgery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether comprehensive radiation therapy is more effective than standard radiation therapy in treating patients with early-stage breast cancer.
    Location: 578 locations

  • Palbociclib and Letrozole or Fulvestrant in Treating Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive, HER2 Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well palbociclib and letrozole or fulvestrant works in treating patients with estrogen receptor positive, HER2 negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as letrozole or fulvestrant, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving palbociclib and letrozole or fulvestrant may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 346 locations

  • Regional Radiation Therapy with or without Whole Breast Irradiation in Treating Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive, HER2 Negative Low Risk Breast Cancer Who Have Undergone Breast Conserving Surgery or Mastectomy

    This randomized phase III trial studies if not giving regional radiotherapy is just as good as using regional radiotherapy in keeping breast cancer from coming back in patients with estrogen receptor (ER) positive, HER2 negative node positive low risk breast cancer who have undergone breast conserving surgery or mastectomy. Women with ER positive breast cancer normally will receive endocrine therapy and some may receive chemotherapy to help prevent the cancer from coming back. Many women will also receive radiotherapy to the whole breast / chest area and the surrounding lymph glands (called regional radiotherapy). Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not known whether patients with low risk breast cancer need to receive regional radiotherapy. As a result, some women may be getting regional radiotherapy who do not need it and be exposed to the side effects of their treatment without benefit. This study will help to determine if regional radiotherapy can be omitted for low risk ER positive node positive breast cancer patients.
    Location: 113 locations

  • Standard of Care Therapy with or without Stereotactic Radiosurgery and / or Surgery in Treating Patients with Limited Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well standard of care therapy with stereotactic radiosurgery and / or surgery works and compares it to standard of care therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to one or two locations in the body (limited metastatic) that are previously untreated. Standard of care therapy comprising chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy, and others may help stop the spread of tumor cells. Radiation therapy and / or surgery is usually only given with standard of care therapy to relieve pain; however, in patients with limited metastatic breast cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, may be able to send x-rays directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue and surgery may be able to effectively remove the metastatic tumor cells. It is not yet known whether standard of care therapy is more effective with stereotactic radiosurgery and / or surgery in treating limited metastatic breast cancer.
    Location: 125 locations

  • Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy or Stereotactic Radiosurgery with or without Lapatinib Ditosylate in Treating Patients with Brain Metastasis from HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well whole-brain radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery with or without lapatinib ditosylate works in treating patients with breast cancer that has too many of a protein called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on its cells and has spread to the brain. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Lapatinib ditosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether whole-brain radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery together with lapatinib ditosylate is an effective treatment for brain metastasis from breast cancer.
    Location: 201 locations

  • Paclitaxel, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab with or without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab with or without atezolizumab works in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and atezolizumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab with or without atezolizumab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 80 locations

  • Radiation Therapy with or without Olaparib in Treating Patients with Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well radiation therapy with or without olaparib works in treating patients with inflammatory breast cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy with or without olaparib may work better in treating patients with inflammatory breast cancer.
    Location: 67 locations

  • Olaparib with or without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Non-HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well olaparib with or without atezolizumab work in treating patients with non-HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the tumor, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not known whether giving olaparib with or without atezolizumab will work better in patients with non-HER2-positive breast cancer.
    Location: 52 locations

  • Proton Beam Radiation Therapy or Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Non-Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies proton beam radiation therapy (proton therapy) compared to photon beam radiation therapy (photon therapy) in treating patients with breast cancer that has not spread to other places in the body (non-metastatic). Radiation therapy is an important treatment for breast cancer, however, radiation goes to other organs, such as heart, causing heart problems. Proton therapy is a type of radiation therapy that uses multiple beams of protons (tiny particles with a positive charge) to kill tumor cells without damaging normal tissue. Photon therapy is also a type of radiation therapy that uses multiple x-ray beams. The radiation dose is delivered at the surface of the body and goes into the tumor and through the body which may damage normal tissue. It is not yet known whether proton therapy is more effective than photon therapy in treating patients with non-metastatic breast cancer without causing heart damage.
    Location: 36 locations

  • Comparison of Operative to Monitoring and Endocrine Therapy (COMET) Trial For Low Risk DCIS

    This study looks at the risks and benefits of active surveillance (AS) compared to guideline concordant care (GCC) in the setting of a pragmatic prospective randomized trial for low risk DCIS. Our overarching hypothesis is that management of low-risk Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) using an AS approach does not yield inferior cancer or quality of life outcomes compared to GCC.
    Location: 34 locations

  • Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1 / 2 / 3 (Trk A / B / C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions)

    This is an open-label, multicenter, global Phase 2 basket study of entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the treatment of patients with solid tumors that harbor an NTRK1 / 2 / 3, ROS1, or ALK gene fusion. Patients will be assigned to different baskets according to tumor type and gene fusion.
    Location: 28 locations

  • A Study of Tucatinib vs. Placebo in Combination With Capecitabine & Trastuzumab in Patients With Advanced HER2+ Breast Cancer

    This study is being done to see if tucatinib works better than placebo to help patients who have a specific type of breast cancer called HER2 positive breast carcinoma. The breast cancer in this study is either metastatic (spread into other parts of the body) or cannot be removed completely with surgery. All patients in the study will get capecitabine and trastuzumab, two drugs that are often used to treat this cancer. Patients in this study will be randomly assigned to get either tucatinib or placebo (a pill with no medicine). This is a blinded study, so neither patients nor their doctors will know whether a patient gets tucatinib or placebo. Each treatment cycle lasts 21 days. Patients will swallow tucatinib pills or placebo pills two times every day. They will swallow capecitabine pills two times a day during the first two weeks of each cycle. Patients will get trastuzumab injections from the study site staff on the first day of every cycle.
    Location: 25 locations

  • Randomized, Open Label, Clinical Study of the Targeted Therapy, Palbociclib, to Treat Metastatic Breast Cancer

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate that the combination of palbociclib with anti-HER2 therapy plus endocrine therapy is superior to anti-HER2-based therapy plus endocrine therapy alone in improving the outcomes of subjects with hormone receptor-positive, HER2+ metastatic breast cancer.
    Location: 26 locations

  • Neratinib HER Mutation Basket Study (SUMMIT)

    This is an open-label, non-randomized, multicenter, multinational, Phase 2 study exploring the efficacy and safety of neratinib as monotherapy or in combination with other therapies in patients with ERBB mutation-positive or EGFR gene-amplified solid tumors.
    Location: 24 locations

  • Phase 1 / 1b Study to Evaluate the Safety and Tolerability of CPI-444 Alone and in Combination With Atezolizumab in Advanced Cancers

    This is a phase 1 / 1b open-label, multicenter, dose-selection study of CPI-444, an oral small molecule targeting the adenosine-A2A receptor on T-lymphocytes and other cells of the immune system. This trial will study the safety, tolerability, and anti-tumor activity of CPI-444 as a single agent and in combination with atezolizumab, a PD-L1 inhibitor against various solid tumors. CPI-444 blocks adenosine from binding to the A2A receptor. Adenosine suppresses the anti-tumor activity of T cells and other immune cells.
    Location: 22 locations

  • A Dose Escalation and Cohort Expansion Study of CD122-Biased Cytokine (NKTR-214) in Combination With Anti-PD-1 Antibody (Nivolumab) or in Combination With Nivolumab and Anti-CTLA4 Antibody (Ipilimumab) in Patients With Select Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    In this four part study, NKTR-214 will be administered in combination with nivolumab in Parts 1 & 2, and with nivolumab and ipilimumab in Parts 3 & 4. In Part 1, the safety, efficacy and recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of NKTR-214 in combination with nivolumab will be determined. In Part 2, the clinical benefit, safety, and tolerability of combining NKTR-214 with nivolumab at the RP2D in select patients with Melanoma, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Urothelial Carcinoma, or Triple Negative Breast Cancer. In Part 3, the safety, efficacy and RP2D of NKTR-214 in combination with nivolumab and ipilimumab will be determined. In Part 4, the clinical benefit, safety, and tolerability of the triplet combination will be evaluated in select patients with RCC or NSCLC. All three drugs target the immune system and may act synergistically to promote anti-cancer effects.
    Location: 21 locations

  • Intraoperative Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Breast Cancer Undergoing Breast-Conserving Surgery

    This phase IV trial studies the side effects of intraoperative radiation therapy and how well it works in treating patients with breast cancer undergoing breast-conserving surgery. Delivering radiation one time to the area where the tumor was removed while the patient is still in the operating room may kill any residual tumor cells and may be as effective as standard radiation therapy in patients with early stage breast cancer.
    Location: 23 locations

  • Fulvestrant with or without Palbociclib and Avelumab in Treating Patients with Hormone Receptor Positive, HER2 Negative Metastatic or Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery Previously Treated with CDK and Endocrine Therapy

    This randomized pilot phase II trial studies how well fulvestrant with or without palbociclib and avelumab works in treating patients with hormone receptor positive, HER2 negative breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body or that has come back after a period of improvement and cannot be removed by surgery, and have been previously treated with CDK and endocrine therapy. Endocrine therapy with fulvestrant prevents growth of hormone receptor positive breast cancer by blocking stimulation of tumor cells by estrogen. Palbociclib is a drug that may stop tumor cells from growing by blocking activity of two closely related enzymes (proteins that help chemical reactions in the body occur), called cyclin dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK 4 / 6) which are known to promote tumor cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the immune system in detecting and fighting tumor cells. Giving fulvestrant with or without palbociclib and avelumab may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 19 locations


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