Treatment Clinical Trials for Breast Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for breast cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 476-500 of 504

  • Phase I Trial of Endoxifen Gel versus Placebo in Women Undergoing Breast Surgery

    This randomized phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of Z-endoxifen hydrochloride in treating participants who are undergoing breast surgery. Z-endoxifen hydrochloride may treat or reduce the risk of breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study of Abemaciclib (LY2835219) in Combination With Fulvestrant Compared to Chemotherapy in Women With HR Positive, HER2 Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    The reason for this study is to compare the efficacy of abemaciclib, in combination with fulvestrant, to that of physician's choice of chemotherapy in women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) metastatic breast cancer that has spread to internal organs. Your participation in this trial could last up to 31 months, depending on your cancer type and how you and your tumor respond.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Standard of Care Therapy with or without Stereotactic Radiosurgery and / or Surgery in Treating Patients with Limited Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well standard of care therapy with stereotactic radiosurgery and / or surgery works and compares it to standard of care therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to one or two locations in the body (limited metastatic) that are previously untreated. Standard of care therapy comprising chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy, and others may help stop the spread of tumor cells. Radiation therapy and / or surgery is usually only given with standard of care therapy to relieve pain; however, in patients with limited metastatic breast cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, may be able to send x-rays directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue and surgery may be able to effectively remove the metastatic tumor cells. It is not yet known whether standard of care therapy is more effective with stereotactic radiosurgery and / or surgery in treating limited metastatic breast cancer.
    Location: 119 locations

  • FES-PET / CT Scans for the Optimization of Tamoxifen Dose in Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive, ESR1 Mutant Metastatic or Unresectable Breast Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well FES-PET / CT scans work in determining the best dose of tamoxifen for treating patients with estrogen receptor positive, ESR1 gene mutant breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). FES is a low-dose radioactive form of estrogen and can "light up" where estrogen receptor positive cancer is present in the body. Diagnostic procedures such as FES-PET / CT, may help to determine the optimal dose of tamoxifen and prevent treatment resistance due to underdosing on standard dose of tamoxifen in patients with breast cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • ASTX727 and Talazoparib for the Treatment of Triple Negative or Hormone Resistant / HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ASTX727 and talazoparib in treating patients with triple negative or hormone resistant / HER2-negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). ASTX727 is a combination of two chemotherapy drugs, cedazuridine and decitabine, and may increase the immune system's response to cancer and talazoparib. Talazoparib is an anticancer drug called a PARP (poly ADP ribose polymerase) inhibitor and is in development for the treatment of a variety of cancers. The combination of ASTX727 and talazoparib may help boost the immune system to stop or reverse the growth of tumors.
    Location: Indiana University / Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana

  • Ketogenic Diet with Letrozole in Treating Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well ketogenic diet with letrozole works in treating patients with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Estrogen receptor positive breast cancer has special proteins on it, called estrogen receptors, that allow it to grow when exposed to estrogen. A ketogenic diet (low calorie, low carbohydrate) may help normalize abnormally high insulin levels that in turn may slow the growth of cancer cells. Letrozole may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.The purpose of this study is to learn if the combination of a 2 week ketogenic diet in combination with letrozole can help slow the growth of tumors.
    Location: Vanderbilt University / Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee

  • Capecitabine and Radiation Therapy after Surgery in Treating Patients with Non-Metastatic Invasive Breast cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well capecitabine and radiation therapy after surgery work in treating patients with invasive breast cancer that has not spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving capecitabine and radiation therapy together may kill more tumor cells in patients with invasive breast cancer compared to capecitabine or radiation therapy alone.
    Location: Vanderbilt University / Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee

  • Heat therapy (Hyperthermia) and Olaparib in Treating Breast Cancer Patients with Chest Wall Recurrences

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of olaparib when given with hyperthermia in treating patients with breast cancer that has come back in the chest wall. PARPs are proteins that help repair DNA mutations. PARP inhibitors, such as olaparib, can keep PARP from working, so tumor cells can't repair themselves, and they may stop growing. Hyperthermia is a a type of treatment in which body tissue is exposed to high temperatures to damage and kill cancer cells or to make cancer cells more sensitive to the effects of certain anticancer drugs. Giving olaparib and hyperthermia treatment may work better in treating patients with breast cancer that has come back in the chest wall compared to standard of care.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • MRI-Guided Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Treating Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation works in treating patients with breast cancer that is early in its growth and may not have spread to other parts of the body. Accelerated partial breast irradiation is a localized form of radiation delivered after surgery to the part of the breast where the tumor was removed only, which may spare the remaining healthy breast tissue. MRI is an imaging technique used to form pictures of the area of treatment to allow for the treatment to focus more on the tumor site. This study may help researchers determine if giving MRI-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation after surgery reduces the side effects that can occur to surrounding healthy tissue.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • ONC201 with or without Methionine-Restricted Diet in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Unresectable Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well ONC201 with or without methionine-restricted (MR) diet works in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. ONC201 activates a process that leads to the death of a cell. ONC201 is able to target tumor cells to get rid of them, but does not affect normal cells. Patients on the MR diet eat only methionine-restricted food. The addition of an intermittent MR diet may enhance the activity of ONC201. Giving ONC201 and an MR diet may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Blood and Imaging Based Biomarkers in Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive Stage 0-III Breast Cancer

    This pilot research trial studies the blood and imaging based biomarkers in patients with estrogen receptor positive stage 0-III breast cancer. Studying blood and imaging based biomarkers may help doctors to find potential indicators of those who are at risk of developing aromatase inhibitor-induced musculoskeletal syndrome.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Molecular Profile of Breast Cancer in Ugandan Patients with Stage IIB-III Breast Cancer

    This phase I trials studies the molecular profile of breast cancer in Ugandan patients with stage IIB-III breast cancer. Creating a molecular profile of breast cancer my help doctors learn more about biological factors associated with breast cancer in Ugandan patients with as well as measure the benefits of locally available diagnostic studies and the possibility of providing treatment via oral medication.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Direct Tumor Microinjection and FDG-PET in Testing Drug Sensitivity in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Stage IV Breast Cancer

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of direct tumor microinjection and fludeoxyglucose F-18 positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in testing drug sensitivity in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or stage IV breast cancer that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Injecting tiny amounts of anti-cancer drugs directly into tumors on the skin or in lymph nodes and diagnostic procedures, such as FDG-PET, may help to show which drugs work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or breast cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Recurrence in Patients with Her-2 Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well vaccine therapy works in preventing recurrence (return of breast cancer) in patients with HER-2 positive stage I-III breast cancer. Vaccines work by boosting the immune system (a system in our bodies that protects us against infection) to recognize and destroy the cancer causing cell proteins.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel followed by Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well carboplatin and paclitaxel followed by doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide work in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, paclitaxel, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Ribociclib in Treating Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well ribociclib works in treating patients with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Ribociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and Mifepristone in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Unresectable HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and mifepristone works in treating patients with HER2-negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body, or to nearby tissues or lymph nodes and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Hormone therapy using mifepristone may fight breast cancer by lowering the amount of progesterone and glucocorticoid the body makes. Giving pembrolizumab and mifepristone may work better in treating patients with HER2-negative breast cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Boswellia Serrata Extract in Treating Patients with Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ, Stage I-III Breast Cancer, or Stage I-III Colon Cancer That Are Undergoing Surgery

    This phase I trial studies how well Boswellia serrata extract works in treating patients with ductal breast carcinoma in situ, stage I-III breast cancer, or stage I-III colon cancer that are undergoing surgery. Boswellia serrata extract is a supplement made from the Boswellia serrata plant, which helps to reduce inflammation in the body, and may change the make up of the tumors of patients who have breast and colon cancer.
    Location: Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

  • Copanlisib, Letrozole, and Palbociclib in Treating Patients with Hormone Receptor Positive HER2 Negative Stage I-IV Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies side effects and best dose of copanlisib when given together with letrozole and palbociclib and to see how well they work in treating hormone receptor positive HER2 negative stage I-IV breast cancer. Copanlisib and palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs, such as letrozole, may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body. Giving copanlisib, letrozole, and palbociclib may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Pembrolizumab and Binimetinib in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose of pembrolizumab and binimetinib and how well it works when giving together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Binimetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and binimetinib may work better in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Paclitaxel before Surgery in Treating Patients with Breast Cancer

    This phase III trial studies how well paclitaxel before surgery works in treating patients with breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Metformin Hydrochloride and Doxycycline in Treating Patients with Localized Breast, Uterine, or Cervical Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well metformin hydrochloride works together with doxycycline in treating patients with localized breast, uterine, or cervical cancer. Metformin hydrochloride may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Doxycycline may stop the growth of bacteria by keeping them from making proteins and minimized the toxic side effects of anti-cancer therapy. It is not yet known whether giving metformin hydrochloride together with doxycycline may be a better way in treating patients with localized breast, uterine, or cervical cancer.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Alisertib with or without Fulvestrant in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic, Endocrine-Resistant Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well alisertib with or without fulvestrant works in treating patients with endocrine-resistant breast cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Alisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Hormone therapy using fulvestrant may fight breast cancer by blocking the use of estrogen by the tumor cells or reducing the amount of estrogen made by the body. Giving alisertib with or without fulvestrant may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Genetically Modified T-Cell Therapy in Treating Patients with Advanced ROR1+ Malignancies

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of genetically modified T-cell therapy in treating patients with receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 positive (ROR1+) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), or triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced). Genetically modified therapies, such as ROR1 specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells, are taken from a patient's blood, modified in the laboratory so they specifically may kill cancer cells with a protein called ROR1 on their surfaces, and safely given back to the patient after conventional therapy. The "genetically modified" T-cells have genes added in the laboratory to make them recognize ROR1.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Galunisertib and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Metastatic Androgen Receptor Negative or Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of galunisertib when given together with paclitaxel in treating patients with androgen receptor negative or triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Some tumors need growth factors, which are made by the body's white blood cells, to keep growing. Galunisertib may interfere with growth factors and help cause tumor cells to die. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving glunisertib together with paclitaxel may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Vanderbilt University / Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee