Treatment Clinical Trials for Breast Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for breast cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 476-500 of 502

  • ASTX727 and Talazoparib for the Treatment of Triple Negative or Hormone Resistant / HER2-Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ASTX727 and talazoparib in treating patients with triple negative or hormone resistant / HER2-negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). ASTX727 is a combination of two chemotherapy drugs, cedazuridine and decitabine, and may increase the immune system's response to cancer and talazoparib. Talazoparib is an anticancer drug called a PARP (poly ADP ribose polymerase) inhibitor and is in development for the treatment of a variety of cancers. The combination of ASTX727 and talazoparib may help boost the immune system to stop or reverse the growth of tumors.
    Location: Indiana University / Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana

  • Chemokine Modulation Therapy and Standard Chemotherapy before Surgery for the Treatment of Early Stage Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of chemokine modulation therapy when given together with standard chemotherapy given before surgery in treating patients with early stage triple negative breast cancer. Chemokines are molecules that are involved in a variety of immune and inflammatory responses. Chemokine modulation therapy, including celecoxib, recombinant interferon alfa-2b, and rintatolimod, may modify the immune response and tumor-related processes and may stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in standard chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemokine modulation therapy together with standard chemotherapy may work better than giving either therapy alone in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Topical Afimoxifene in Treating Patients with Breast Cancer Who Have Undergone Radiation Therapy on One Breast

    This phase II trial studies how well topical afimoxifene works in treating patients with breast cancer who have undergone radiation therapy on one breast. Topical afimoxifene is a quick-drying medicated gel that may block the growth of breast cancer cells when applied to the breast skin. The purpose of this research is to determine what effect, if any, differences in skin type between women have on the delivery of topical afimoxifene to the breast tissue, and whether radiation affects the delivery of topical afimoxifene to breast tissue.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Abemaciclib in Treating Patients with Surgically Resectable, Chemotherapy Resistant, Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well abemaciclib works in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that can be removed by surgery and does not respond to treatment with chemotherapy. Abemaciclib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Capecitabine and Radiation Therapy after Surgery in Treating Patients with Non-Metastatic Invasive Breast cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well capecitabine and radiation therapy after surgery work in treating patients with invasive breast cancer that has not spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving capecitabine and radiation therapy together may kill more tumor cells in patients with invasive breast cancer compared to capecitabine or radiation therapy alone.
    Location: Vanderbilt University / Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee

  • Olaparib, Palbociclib, and Fulvestrant in Treating Patients with BRCA Mutation-Associated, Hormone Receptor-Positive, and HER2-Negative Advanced Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of palbociclib when given together with olaparib and fulvestrant, and to see how well they work in treating patients with BRCA mutation-associated, hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer that has spread from its original site of growth to nearby tissues or lymph nodes and cannot be removed by surgery, or has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Palbociclib and olaparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Anti-hormone therapy consisting of fulvestrant may prevent breast cancer cell growth by blocking estrogen and progesterone receptor stimulation. This trial studies the effectiveness of the combination of palbociclib, olaparib and fulvestrant.
    Location: 2 locations

  • SCOUT Reflector for Tagging Lymph Nodes for Targeted Removal in Patients with Breast Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial will evaluate whether the SCOUT reflector can be used to tag abnormal lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer prior to chemotherapy for targeted removal at the time of surgery. The SCOUT localization system with the SAVI reflector is non-radioactive and completely internal so can be placed into an abnormal lymph node prior to chemotherapy treatment, which theoretically will allow easier identification and therefore more reliable targeting of the abnormal lymph node for surgical removal.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Stellate Ganglion Blockade with Bupivacaine Hydrochloride in Reducing Hot Flashes in Hispanic Patients with Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well a stellate ganglion blockade with bupivacaine hydrochloride works in reducing hot flashes in Hispanic patients with breast cancer. A stellate ganglion blockade using bupivacaine hydrochloride (a local anesthetic used to block signals at nerve endings) may help to reduce the number and severity of hot flashes in Hispanic patients with breast cancer.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin before Surgery in Treating Nigerian Women with Stage IIA-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well paclitaxel works with carboplatin before surgery in treating Nigerian women with stage IIA-IIIC breast cancer before surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Standard of Care Therapy with or without Stereotactic Radiosurgery and / or Surgery in Treating Patients with Limited Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies how well standard of care therapy with stereotactic radiosurgery and / or surgery works and compares it to standard of care therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to one or two locations in the body (limited metastatic) that are previously untreated. Standard of care therapy comprising chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biological therapy, and others may help stop the spread of tumor cells. Radiation therapy and / or surgery is usually only given with standard of care therapy to relieve pain; however, in patients with limited metastatic breast cancer, stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, may be able to send x-rays directly to the tumor and cause less damage to normal tissue and surgery may be able to effectively remove the metastatic tumor cells. It is not yet known whether standard of care therapy is more effective with stereotactic radiosurgery and / or surgery in treating limited metastatic breast cancer.
    Location: 131 locations

  • ONC201 in Recurrent / Refractory Metastatic Breast Cancer and Advanced Endometrial Carcinoma

    Background: The new drug ONC201 have been shown to kill breast cancer and endometrial cancer cells in the laboratory. The exact mechanism of action is not completely clear yet, but the ONC201 destroys the mitochondria inside the cells. Blocking mitochondrial activity may kill tumor cells, which would shrink tumors. Researchers want to see if ONC201 helps shrink tumors of certain breast or endometrial cancers and if that effect is maintained. Objective: To see if ONC201 shrinks tumors with a lasting effect. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older who have metastatic breast cancer (hormone-positive or triple-negative) or metastatic endometrial cancers. Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Heart, blood, and urine tests CT and bone scans Review of medical report and tumor sample Participants will have a tumor biopsy before starting treatment and after 5 weeks taking the study drug. A scan or ultrasound may be used to guide the biopsy. Patients will receive local anesthetic and a needle will remove a small piece of tumor. The study will be done in 28-day cycles. Every day 1 of each cycle participants will repeat most screening tests, will be seen by the physician and receive a supply of the study drug. Participants will take the study drug by mouth once every 7 days. They will keep a diary of when they take the drug and any side effects. During cycle 1, participants will get weekly calls to discuss their health and symptoms. Images will be repeated every 2 cycles to evaluate reponse to the treatment. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Lymph Node Dissection and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Breast Cancer Previously Treated with Chemotherapy and Surgery

    This randomized phase III trial studies lymph node dissection and radiation therapy to see how well it works compared to radiation therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy and surgery. Lymph node dissection may remove cancer cells that have spread to nearby lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays or protons to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known if radiation therapy works better alone or with lymph node dissection in treating patients with breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy and surgery.
    Location: 988 locations

  • MRI-Guided Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Treating Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation works in treating patients with breast cancer that is early in its growth and may not have spread to other parts of the body. Accelerated partial breast irradiation is a localized form of radiation delivered after surgery to the part of the breast where the tumor was removed only, which may spare the remaining healthy breast tissue. MRI is an imaging technique used to form pictures of the area of treatment to allow for the treatment to focus more on the tumor site. This study may help researchers determine if giving MRI-guided accelerated partial breast irradiation after surgery reduces the side effects that can occur to surrounding healthy tissue.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Molecular Profile of Breast Cancer in Ugandan Patients with Stage IIB-III Breast Cancer

    This phase I trials studies the molecular profile of breast cancer in Ugandan patients with stage IIB-III breast cancer. Creating a molecular profile of breast cancer my help doctors learn more about biological factors associated with breast cancer in Ugandan patients with as well as measure the benefits of locally available diagnostic studies and the possibility of providing treatment via oral medication.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Direct Tumor Microinjection and FDG-PET in Testing Drug Sensitivity in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Stage IV Breast Cancer

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of direct tumor microinjection and fludeoxyglucose F-18 positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in testing drug sensitivity in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or stage IV breast cancer that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Injecting tiny amounts of anti-cancer drugs directly into tumors on the skin or in lymph nodes and diagnostic procedures, such as FDG-PET, may help to show which drugs work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or breast cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Chemotherapy with or without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without metformin hydrochloride work in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, carboplatin, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and pegfilgrastim, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Metformin hydrochloride may prevent or lower risk of breast cancer and decrease cancer cells, lower risk of cancer spreading. It is not yet known whether giving metformin hydrochloride with chemotherapy will work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and Mifepristone in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Locally Advanced and Unresectable HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and mifepristone works in treating patients with HER2-negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body, or to nearby tissues or lymph nodes and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Hormone therapy using mifepristone may fight breast cancer by lowering the amount of progesterone and glucocorticoid the body makes. Giving pembrolizumab and mifepristone may work better in treating patients with HER2-negative breast cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Copanlisib, Letrozole, and Palbociclib in Treating Patients with Hormone Receptor Positive HER2 Negative Stage I-IV Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies side effects and best dose of copanlisib when given together with letrozole and palbociclib and to see how well they work in treating hormone receptor positive HER2 negative stage I-IV breast cancer. Copanlisib and palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs, such as letrozole, may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body. Giving copanlisib, letrozole, and palbociclib may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Tucatinib, Letrozole, and Palbociclib in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Hormone Receptor and HER2 Positive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the side effects of tucatinib, letrozole, and palbociclib and how well they work in treating patients with in hormone receptor and HER2 positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Tucatinib, letrozole, and palbociclib, may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Pembrolizumab and Ruxolitinib Phosphate in Treating Patients with Metastatic Stage IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ruxolitinib phosphate when given together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with stage IV triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Ruxolitinib phosphate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and ruxolitinib phosphate together may work better in treating patients with stage IV triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Scottsdale, Arizona

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Rare Tumors

    This phase II trial studies nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial enrolls participants for the following cohorts based on condition: 1. Epithelial tumors of nasal cavity, sinuses, nasopharynx: A) Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx and trachea (excluding laryngeal, nasopharyngeal cancer [NPC], and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck [SCCHN]) B) Adenocarcinoma and variants of nasal cavity, sinuses, and nasopharynx (closed to accrual 07 / 27 / 2018) 2. Epithelial tumors of major salivary glands (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 3. Salivary gland type tumors of head and neck, lip, esophagus, stomach, trachea and lung, breast and other location (closed to accrual) 4. Undifferentiated carcinoma of gastrointestinal (GI) tract 5. Adenocarcinoma with variants of small intestine (closed to accrual 05 / 10 / 2018) 6. Squamous cell carcinoma with variants of GI tract (stomach small intestine, colon, rectum, pancreas) (closed to accrual 10 / 17 / 2018) 7. Fibromixoma and low grade mucinous adenocarcinoma (pseudomixoma peritonei) of the appendix and ovary (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 8. Rare pancreatic tumors including acinar cell carcinoma, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or serous cystadenocarcinoma. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is not eligible 9. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 10. Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and bile duct tumors (closed to accrual 03 / 20 / 2018) 11. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of lung 12. Bronchoalveolar carcinoma lung. This condition is now also referred to as adenocarcinoma in situ, minimally invasive adenocarcinoma, lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma, or invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma 13. Non-epithelial tumors of the ovary: A) Germ cell tumor of ovary B) Mullerian mixed tumor and adenosarcoma (closed to accrual 03 / 30 / 2018) 14. Trophoblastic tumor: A) Choriocarcinoma (closed to accrual 04 / 15 / 2019) 15. Transitional cell carcinoma other than that of the renal, pelvis, ureter, or bladder (closed to accrual 04 / 15 / 2019) 16. Cell tumor of the testes and extragonadal germ tumors: A) Seminoma and testicular sex cord cancer B) Non-seminomatous tumor C) Teratoma with malignant transformation (closed to accrual 3 / 15 / 2019) 17. Epithelial tumors of penis - squamous adenocarcinoma cell carcinoma with variants of penis 18. Squamous cell carcinoma variants of the genitourinary (GU) system 19. Spindle cell carcinoma of kidney, pelvis, ureter 20. Adenocarcinoma with variants of GU system (excluding prostate cancer) (closed to accrual 07 / 27 / 2018) 21. Odontogenic malignant tumors 22. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) (formerly named: Endocrine carcinoma of pancreas and digestive tract.) 23. Neuroendocrine carcinoma including carcinoid of the lung (closed to accrual 12 / 19 / 2017) 24. Pheochromocytoma, malignant 25. Paraganglioma (closed to accrual 11 / 29 / 2018) 26. Carcinomas of pituitary gland, thyroid gland parathyroid gland and adrenal cortex 27. Desmoid tumors 28. Peripheral nerve sheath tumors and NF1-related tumors (closed to accrual 09 / 19 / 2018) 29. Malignant giant cell tumors 30. Chordoma (closed to accrual 11 / 29 / 2018) 31. Adrenal cortical tumors (closed to accrual 06 / 27 / 2018) 32. Tumor of unknown primary (Cancer of Unknown Primary; CuP) (closed to accrual 12 / 22 / 2017) 33. Not Otherwise Categorized (NOC) Rare Tumors [To obtain permission to enroll in the NOC cohort, contact: S1609SC@swog.org] (closed to accrual 03 / 15 / 2019) 34. Adenoid cystic carcinoma (closed to accrual 02 / 06 / 2018) 35. Vulvar cancer 36. MetaPLASTIC carcinoma (of the breast) 37. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) (closed to accrual 09 / 26 / 2018) 38. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) 39. Apocrine tumors / extramammary Paget’s disease 40. Peritoneal mesothelioma 41. Basal cell carcinoma 42. Clear cell cervical cancer 43. Esthenioneuroblastoma 44. Endometrial carcinosarcoma (malignant mixed Mullerian tumors) (closed to accrual) 45. Clear cell cervical endometrial cancer 46. Clear cell ovarian cancer 47. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) 48. Gallbladder cancer 49. Small cell carcinoma of the ovary, hypercalcemic type 50. PD-L1 amplified tumors 51. Angiosarcoma 52. High-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor [PNET] should be enrolled in Cohort 22; prostatic neuroendocrine carcinomas should be enrolled into Cohort 53). Small cell lung cancer is not eligible 53. Treatment-emergent small-cell neuroendocrine prostate cancer (t-SCNC)
    Location: 878 locations

  • 18F-FBnTP Positron Emission Mammography in Detecting Breast Cancer in Patients with Intraductal Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well 18F-FBnTP positron emission mammography works in detecting breast cancer in patients with intraductal breast cancer. 18F-FBnTP positron emission mammography may detect may detect breast lesions with better sensitivity and better specificity.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • S1222 Trial (Everolimus, Anastrozole and Fulvestrant) in Post-Menopausal Stage IV Breast Cancer

    This randomized Phase III trial studies how well the combination of fulvestrant and everolimus together or the combination of anastrozole, fulvestrant and everolimus together, improve progression-free survival (PFS) versus fulvestrant alone.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients with Stage IB-IIIA Breast Cancer

    This phase II clinical trial studies the side effects of vaccine therapy in treating patients with stage IB-IIIA breast cancer. Vaccines made from peptides and immune stimulant may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Proton Beam Scanning before Surgery in Treating Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of accelerated partial breast irradiation using proton beam scanning and to see how well it works before surgery in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using proton beam scanning administered in higher doses over a shorter time period may help stop cancer from growing while protecting normal tissue cells.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov