Treatment Clinical Trials for Breast Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for breast cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 501-505 of 505
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  • Genetically Modified T-Cell Therapy in Treating Patients with Advanced ROR1+ Malignancies

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of genetically modified T-cell therapy in treating patients with receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 positive (ROR1+) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), or triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced). Genetically modified therapies, such as ROR1 specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells, are taken from a patient's blood, modified in the laboratory so they specifically may kill cancer cells with a protein called ROR1 on their surfaces, and safely given back to the patient after conventional therapy. The "genetically modified" T-cells have genes added in the laboratory to make them recognize ROR1.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Galunisertib and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Metastatic Androgen Receptor Negative or Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of galunisertib when given together with paclitaxel in treating patients with androgen receptor negative or triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Some tumors need growth factors, which are made by the body's white blood cells, to keep growing. Galunisertib may interfere with growth factors and help cause tumor cells to die. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving glunisertib together with paclitaxel may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Vanderbilt University / Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee

  • 18F-FBnTP Positron Emission Mammography in Detecting Breast Cancer in Patients with Intraductal Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well 18F-FBnTP positron emission mammography works in detecting breast cancer in patients with intraductal breast cancer. 18F-FBnTP positron emission mammography may detect may detect breast lesions with better sensitivity and better specificity.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Proton Beam Scanning before Surgery in Treating Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of accelerated partial breast irradiation using proton beam scanning and to see how well it works before surgery in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using proton beam scanning administered in higher doses over a shorter time period may help stop cancer from growing while protecting normal tissue cells.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Nivolumab and Cabozantinib in Treating Patients with Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and cabozantinib work in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving nivolumab and cabozantinib may work better in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov


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