Treatment Clinical Trials for Breast Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for breast cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 551-559 of 559
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  • Direct Tumor Microinjection and FDG-PET in Testing Drug Sensitivity in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Stage IV Breast Cancer

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of direct tumor microinjection and fludeoxyglucose F-18 positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in testing drug sensitivity in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or stage IV breast cancer that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Injecting tiny amounts of anti-cancer drugs directly into tumors on the skin or in lymph nodes and diagnostic procedures, such as FDG-PET, may help to show which drugs work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, or breast cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Trastuzumab, Vinorelbine Tartrate, and Avelumab with or without Utomilumab in Treating Patients with HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the how well trastuzumab, vinorelbine tartrate, and avelumab with or without utomilumab work in treating patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it attaches itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body's immune system. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vinorelbine tartrate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Utolimumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving trastuzumab, vinorelbine tartrate, and avelumab with or without utomilumab may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 26 locations

  • Administration of Autologous T-Cells Genetically Engineered to Express T-Cell Receptors Reactive Against Neoantigens in People With Metastatic Cancer

    Background: A person s tumor is studied for mutations. When cells are found that can attack the mutation in a person s tumor, the genes from those cells are studied to find the parts that make the attack possible. White blood cells are then taken from the person s body, and the gene transfer occurs in a laboratory. A type of virus is used to transfer the genes that make those white blood cells able to attack the mutation in the tumor. The gene transfer therapy is the return of those white blood cells back to the person. Objective: To see if gene transfer therapy of white blood cells can shrink tumors. Eligibility: People with certain metastatic cancer for which standard treatments have not worked. Design: Participants may complete screening under another protocol. Screening includes: - Getting tumor cells from a previous procedure - Medical history - Physical exam - Scans - Blood, urine, heart, and lung tests The study has 8 stages: 1. Screening tests repeated over 1-2 weeks. Participants will have leukapheresis: Blood is removed by a needle in one arm. A machine removes white blood cells. The rest of the blood is returned by a needle in the other arm. 2. Care at home over approximately 12 weeks. 3. Stopping therapy for 4-6 weeks while their cells are changed in a lab. 4. Hospital stay approximately 3-4 weeks for treatment. An IV catheter will be placed in the chest to administer drugs. 5. Patients on Arm 2 of the study will receive the first dose of pembrolizumab while in the hospital. Three additional doses will be given after the cell infusion 3 weeks apart. 6. Receiving changed cells by catheter. Then getting a drug over 1-5 days to help the cells live longer. 7. Recover in the hospital for 1-2 weeks. Participants will get drugs and have blood and urine tests. 8. Participants will take an antibiotic and maybe an antiviral for at least 6 months after treatment. They will have repeat screening tests at visits every few months for the first year, every 6 months for the second year, then as determined. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced, Resectable, or Inflammatory Her2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well two different anti-cancer treatment regimens which both contain trastuzumab and pertuzumab, but with different combinations of chemotherapy work in shrinking cancer before surgery in patients with localized Her2 positive breast cancer. Trastuzumab and pertuzumab are forms of “targeted therapy” because they work by attaching to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab or pertuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the cancer cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, docetaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab with pertuzumab, in addition to combination chemotherapy has been shown to be very effective in shrinking cancer before surgery in patients with Her2 positive locally advanced breast cancer. This trial aims to help determine which regimen may work best with the least toxicity.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel followed by Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well carboplatin and paclitaxel followed by doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide work in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin, paclitaxel, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Alisertib with or without Fulvestrant in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic, Endocrine-Resistant Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well alisertib with or without fulvestrant works in treating patients with endocrine-resistant breast cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Alisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Hormone therapy using fulvestrant may fight breast cancer by blocking the use of estrogen by the tumor cells or reducing the amount of estrogen made by the body. Giving alisertib with or without fulvestrant may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Carboplatin Followed by Surgery and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride and carboplatin followed by surgery and paclitaxel work in treating patients with stage II-III breast cancer that does not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) / neu protein (triple negative). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, carboplatin, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride and carboplatin before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride and carboplatin followed by surgery and paclitaxel may be an effective treatment for breast cancer.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Proton Beam Scanning before Surgery in Treating Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of accelerated partial breast irradiation using proton beam scanning and to see how well it works before surgery in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using proton beam scanning administered in higher doses over a shorter time period may help stop cancer from growing while protecting normal tissue cells.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Nivolumab and Cabozantinib in Treating Patients with Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and cabozantinib work in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving nivolumab and cabozantinib may work better in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov


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