Treatment Clinical Trials for Cervical Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for cervical cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-75 of 80

  • Rapid Analysis and Response Evaluation of Combination Anti-Neoplastic Agents in Rare Tumors (RARE CANCER) Trial: RARE 1 Nilotinib and Paclitaxel

    Background: People with rare cancers often have limited treatment options. The biology of rare cancers is not well understood. Researchers want to find better treatments for these cancers. They want to test 2 drugs that, taken separately, have helped people with non-rare cancers. They want to see if these drugs together can make rare cancers shrink or stop growing. Objective: To learn if nilotinib and paclitaxel will benefit people with rare cancers. Eligibility: People age 18 and older who have a rare, advanced cancer that has progressed after receiving standard treatment, or for which no effective therapy exists. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history and physical exam. They will have blood and urine tests. They will have a pregnancy test if needed. They will have an electrocardiogram to check their heart. They will have imaging scans to measure their tumors. Participants will repeat the screening tests during the study. Participants will receive nilotinib and paclitaxel. The drugs are given in 28-day cycles. Nilotinib is a capsule taken by mouth twice a day. Paclitaxel will be given intravenously by peripheral line or central line once a week for the first 3 weeks of each cycle. Participants will keep a medicine diary. They will track when they take the study drugs and any side effects they may have. Participants may have optional tumor biopsies. Participants can stay on the study until their disease gets worse or they have intolerable side effects. Participants will have a follow-up phone call about 30 days after taking the last dose of study drugs.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • HPV Vaccine PRGN-2009 Alone or in Combination With Anti-PDL1 / TGF-Beta Trap (M7824) in Subjects With HPV Associated Cancers

    Background: For some cancers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), standard treatments are not helpful. Researchers want to see if a vaccine for HPV combined with a drug called M7824 has a better effect on these cancers than when they work alone. Objective: To find a safe dose of HPV vaccine alone or combined with M7824. Also, to test if either HPV vaccine alone or combined with M7824 causes a better immune response. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with locally advanced or metastatic HPV associated cancer (Phase I) or stage II or III p16-positive oropharyngeal cancer (Phase II) Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood, urine, and heart tests Possible photos of skin lesions CT, MRI, or nuclear bone scan: Participants will lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. For the CT scan, they may have a contrast agent injected into a vein. Participants may have up to 2 tumor biopsies. For participants in Phase II, this may be performed with a thin tube placed through the nose into the airway. Participants will receive the HPV vaccine alone or with M7824. For participants on the Phase II, they will receive two doses of HPV vaccine under the skin either alone or with M7824 as an infusion spaced two weeks apart. This will be done prior to their planned chemoradiation or surgery. For participants on the Phase I, they will get the HPV vaccine injected under the skin 2 to 3 times in the first month. Then they will have a booster every 4 weeks. They will receive M7824 as an infusion into a vein every 2 weeks. Treatment will last up to 1 year. After they stop treatment, participants will have a visit within 4 weeks. They will then be contacted for long-term follow-up every year, for the rest of their lives. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • A Safety and Efficacy Study of TAK-981 Plus Pembrolizumab in Participants With Select Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety and tolerability of TAK-981 in combination with pembrolizumab in participants with select solid tumor indications and to establish the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) during Phase 1b of study and to evaluate the preliminary efficacy of TAK-981 at the RP2D in combination with pembrolizumab in participants with select solid tumor indications in Phase 2 of the study.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Combination Immunotherapy in Subjects With Advanced HPV Associated Malignancies

    Background: More than 30,000 cases of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cancers occur annually in the United States. When these cancers spread, they do not respond well to standard treatments and are often incurable. Researchers want to see if a mix of drugs can help. Objective: To learn if a mix of immunotherapy drugs can shrink tumors in people with HPV associated cancers. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with locally advanced or metastatic HPV associated cancer, such as cervical cancers; P16+ oropharyngeal cancers; anal cancers; vulvar, vaginal, penile, and squamous cell rectal cancers; or other locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors (e.g., lung, esophagus) that are known HPV+ cancers Design: Participants will be screened with: - medical history - disease confirmation (or tumor biopsy) - physical exam - body scans (CT, MRI, and / or nuclear) - blood tests - electrocardiogram (to measure the electrical activity of the heart) - urine tests. Participants will get PDS0101 injected under the skin every 4 weeks for 6 doses. Then they will get it every 3 months for 2 doses. Participants will get M7824 by intravenous infusion every 2 weeks. For this, a needle is inserted into a vein. The drug is given over a 1-hour period. Participants will get NHS-IL12 injected under the skin every 4 weeks. Participants will get the study drugs for up to 1 year. They will visit the NIH every 2 weeks. They will repeat the screening tests during the study. About 28 days after treatment ends, participants will have a follow-up visit or telephone call. Then they will be contacted every 3 months for 1 year, and then every 6 months after that, for the rest of their life....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of INCB099280 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and early clinical activity of INCB099280 in participants with select solid tumors
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cervical Cancer Screen-and-Treat Strategy with HPV Self-testing and Thermocoagulation for the Detection and Treatment of Cervical Lesions

    This trial studies the effect of a cervical cancer screen-and-treat strategy with human papillomavirus (HPV) self-testing and thermocoagulation for the detection and treatment of cervical lesions in women from Lilongwe, Malawi. HPV can cause changes or damage on the cervix (i.e. pre-cancerous lesions) that if left untreated, can develop into cervical cancer. Collecting and visually inspecting samples containing cervical and vaginal cells using a vaginal brush may help researchers find out how many women among those screened have HPV. Thermocoagulation involves applying a heated probe to the cervix for approximately 30-40 seconds to destroy abnormal tissues in an effort to prevent cancer development. The screen-and-treat strategy with HPV self-testing and thermocoagulation may help doctors evaluate the detection and treatment of pre-cancerous cervical lesion(s) in women in Malawi.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Safety and Efficacy of KY1044 and Atezolizumab in Advanced Cancer

    A Phase 1 / 2, open label, multi-center study to evaluate the safety, efficacy and tolerability of KY1044 as single agent and in combination with anti-PD-L1 (atezolizumab) in adult patients with selected advanced malignancies, who are ineligible for or there are no available therapies known to confer a clinical benefit for their disease, or they have exhausted all such available options in each indication and therefore will be patients for whom a clinical trial is appropriate.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Nivolumab with or without Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or High Grade Gynecologic Cancer with Metastatic Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab with or without ipilimumab in treating patients with female reproductive cancer that has come back (recurrent) or is high grade and has spread extensively throughout the peritoneal cavity (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • M7824 in Subjects With HPV Associated Malignancies

    Background: In the United States, each year there are more than 30,000 cases of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cancers. Some of these cancers are often incurable and are not improved by standard therapies. Researchers want to see if a new drug M7824, which targets and blocks a pathway that prevents the immune system from effectively fighting the cancer can shrink tumors in people with some HPV cancers. Objectives: To see if the drug M7824 causes tumors to shrink. Eligibility: Adults age 18 and older who have a cancer associated with HPV infection. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history and physical exam. They will review their symptoms and how they perform normal activities. They will have body scans. They will give blood and urine samples. They will have a sample of their tumor tissue taken if one is not available. Participants will have an electrocardiogram to evaluate their heart. Then they will get the study drug through a thin tube in an arm vein. Participants will get the drug every 2 weeks for 26 times (1 year). This is 1 course. After the course, participants will be monitored but will not take the study drug. If their condition gets worse, they will start another course with the drug. This process can be repeated as many times as needed. Treatment will stop if the participant has bad side effects or the drug stops working. Throughout the study, participants will repeat some or all the screening tests. After participants stop taking the drug, they will have a follow-up visit and repeat some screening tests. They will get periodic follow-up phone calls. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Pembrolizumab, Bevacizumab, and Standard Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent, Persistent, or Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab, bevacizumab, and standard chemotherapy work in treating patients with cervical cancer that has come back (recurrent), remains despite treatment (persistent), or is stage IVB. The body's immune system helps fight infections and can also find and kill tumor cells. However, tumors make ways to shut down the immune system defenses. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, cisplatin, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab with bevacizumab and standard chemotherapy may work better in treating cervical cancer compared to bevacizumab and standard chemotherapy alone.
    Location: University of Miami Miller School of Medicine-Sylvester Cancer Center, Miami, Florida

  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Brachytherapy in Treating Patients with Gynecologic Cancers

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well magnetic resonance imaging-guided brachytherapy works in treating patients with gynecologic cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging may be able to successfully guide the placement of the brachytherapy applicator and may help in assessing the tumor better at the time of brachytherapy as compared to routinely used computed tomography scan in treating gynecologic cancers.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Study of COTI-2 as Monotherapy or Combination Therapy for the Treatment of Malignancies

    Activity of COTI-2 has been demonstrated in various cancer tumor models. With its p53- and AKT-based mechanisms of action, COTI-2 is anticipated to be highly relevant in treatment of patients with gynecologic malignancies or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) as well as a variety of other tumor types. This study is designed primarily to assess the safety and tolerability of COTI-2 monotherapy or combination therapy in patients with advanced and recurrent malignancies to establish a recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) for future studies. Patients are currently being recruited for Part 3 of the study. Critical Outcome Technologies Inc. has been renamed to Cotinga Pharmaceuticals.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Focused Ultrasound Ablation and PD-1 Antibody Blockade for the Treatment of Advanced Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of focused ultrasound ablation and how well it works with or without PD-1 antibody blockade (a type of immune infused therapy drug) in treating patients with solid tumors that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). PD-1 antibody blockade is a type of treatment that uses an antibody that has been created to bind to immune cells to enable them to fight off cancer more effectively. The Echopulse device is a computer driven system which guides a high intensity focused ultrasound beam (focused sound waves) to a targeted area of a tumor. Focused ultrasound ablation (FUSA) heats the targeted site which causes the cells to die. In addition to the focused ultrasound beam that can kill cells at its target, the Echopulse device also uses low energy ultrasound for imaging the tumor tissue and the tissue around the tumor to make sure that the focused ultrasound beam hit its target. Imiquimod is an immunomodulator, a drug that interacts with the immune system. Through boosting the immune system, imiquimod may help the body fight off cancer cells. The purpose of this trial is to figure out the safety and effectiveness of FUSA administration alone or with a PD-1 antibody and / or imiquimod.
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • Artesunate Vaginal Inserts for the Treatment of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN2 / 3)

    This is a phase II double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study of Artesunate vaginal inserts for the treatment of women who have cervical high grade intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2 / 3). Participants who receive placebo in this study have the option to receive active drug (artesunate) after their week 15 colposcopy visit.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Niraparib and Dostarlimab for the Treatment of Recurrent or Progressive Cervical Cancer, STAR Study

    This phase II trial studies how well niraparib and dostarlimab work for the treatment of cervical cancer that has come back (recurrent) or is growing, spreading, or getting worse (progressive). Niraparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as dostarlimab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving niraparib and dostarlimab may kill more tumor cells in patients with cervical cancer.
    Location: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Talazoparib and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Locally Recurrent Gynecologic Cancers

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of talazoparib in combination with radiation therapy and to see how well they work in treating patients with gynecologic cancers that have come back after previous treatment (recurrent). Talazoparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving talazoparib in combination with radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with gynecologic cancers.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • MRI-Guided Brachytherapy in Treating Participants with HPV-Associated Stage IB2-IVA Cervical or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    This trial studies how well magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided internal radiation therapy (brachytherapy) works in treating participants with human papillomavirus (HPV) associated stage IB2-IV cervical or stage II-IVA vaginal cancer. Using MRI guidance during brachytherapy applicator placement may improve treatment planning in participants with cervical or vaginal cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Oral TrkA Inhibitor VMD-928 for Treatment of Advanced Adult Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    This is a multicenter, open-label, Phase 1 study of orally administered VMD-928 in adult subjects with advanced solid tumors or lymphoma that have progressed or are non responsive to available therapies and for which no standard or available curative therapy exists
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • DNA Plasmid-encoding Interleukin-12 / HPV DNA Plasmids Therapeutic Vaccine INO-3112 and Durvalumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Human Papillomavirus Associated Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) plasmid-encoding interleukin-12 / human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA plasmids therapeutic vaccine INO-3112 and durvalumab work in treating patients with human papillomavirus associated cancers that have come back or spread to other places in the body. Vaccines made from a gene-modified virus may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving DNA plasmid-encoding interleukin-12 / HPV DNA plasmids therapeutic vaccine INO-3112 and durvalumab may work better in treating patients with human papillomavirus associated cancers.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Basket Study to Evaluate the Therapeutic Activity of RO6874281 as a Combination Therapy in Participants With Advanced and / or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This is an open-label, multicenter, basket trial Phase II study to evaluate the antitumor activity of RO6874281 in combination with atezolizumab in participants with advanced and / or metastatic solid tumors. Currently the focus is on patients with Head and Neck, oesophageal and cervical cancers with confirmed squamous cell carcinoma histology type.
    Location: Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey

  • PEN-866 in Patients With Advanced Solid Malignancies

    Protocol PEN-866-001 is an open-label, multi-center, first-in-human Phase 1 / 2a study evaluating PEN-866 in patients with advanced solid malignancies whose disease has progressed after treatment with previous anticancer therapies.
    Location: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Metformin Hydrochloride and Doxycycline in Treating Patients with Localized Breast, Uterine, or Cervical Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well metformin hydrochloride works together with doxycycline in treating patients with localized breast, uterine, or cervical cancer. Metformin hydrochloride may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Doxycycline may stop the growth of bacteria by keeping them from making proteins and minimized the toxic side effects of anti-cancer therapy. It is not yet known whether giving metformin hydrochloride together with doxycycline may be a better way in treating patients with localized breast, uterine, or cervical cancer.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • E7 TCR T Cell Induction Immunotherapy for Stage IIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    Background: More than 12,000 cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year. A new therapy has been developed that involves taking white blood cells from a person, genetically modifying the cells in a lab so they recognize cancer, and then giving the cells back to the person. Researchers want to see if this therapy can help people with cervical cancer. Objective: To find out if people with Stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer can safely be given E7 TCR T cells before they get standard treatment. Eligibility: People age 18 and older who have Stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer Design: Participants will be screened under a separate protocol. Tests will include: - Physical exam - Medicine review - Blood tests - Pregnancy test (if needed) - Vein assessment - Tumor sample or biopsy - Electrocardiogram (to record the heart s electrical activity) - Imaging scans, x-rays, and / or endoscopy - Heart and / or lung tests. Some screening tests will be repeated during the study. Participants will undergo leukapheresis. For this, blood is removed through a needle in the arm. A machine removes the white blood cells. The rest of the blood is returned through a needle in the other arm. Participants may need to have a large catheter inserted into a vein. Participants will stay at the hospital for 2-3 weeks. They will get chemotherapy drugs. They will get the E7 TCR T cells as an intravenous infusion. They will get the drug aldesleukin. Participants will visit the NIH 3 and 6 weeks after treatment. They will be contacted yearly for 5 years. They will be asked to participate in long-term follow-up for 15 years....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Dose Escalation of DF6002 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, and Expansion in Selected Indications

    This study is a Phase 1 / 2, open-label, dose-escalation study with a consecutive parallel-group efficacy expansion study, designed to determine the safety, tolerability, PK, pharmacodynamics, and preliminary anti-tumor activity of DF6002 as monotherapy and in combination with nivolumab.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Tri-weekly Cisplatin Based Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Current standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer is cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiation (CRT). Although recently reported meta-analysis studies also demonstrated improved local control rates and survival with cisplatin-based chemotherapy concurrent to radiation therapy (RT), the optimal cisplatin dose and dosing schedule are still undetermined. In light of the results of the previous clinical trial, weekly cisplatin 40 mg / m2 considered to be a standard regiment in cisplatin doses and dosing schedules. However, our randomized phase II trial showed that tri-weekly cisplatin 75mg / m2 has lower toxicities and a better outcome in locally advanced cervical cancer. In this randomized phase III trial, the investigators investigate that there may be a survival difference between weekly cisplatin 40 mg / m2 and tri-weekly cisplatin 75 mg / m2 administration concurrent to RT in cervical cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov