Treatment Clinical Trials for Cervical Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for cervical cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-80 of 80

  • Testing the Addition of an Anti-cancer Drug, BAY 1895344, to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Cisplatin, or Cisplatin and Gemcitabine) for Advanced Solid Tumors with Emphasis on Urothelial Cancer

    This phase I trial investigates the best dose and side effects of BAY 1895344 when given together with chemotherapy in treating patients with solid tumors or urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). BAY 1895344 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin and gemcitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this trial is to test the safety of a drug called BAY 1895344 in combination with the usual chemotherapy treatment (cisplatin, or cisplatin and gemcitabine) for the treatment of advanced solid tumors, including urothelial cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Standard Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy with or without Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating HIV-Positive Women with Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well standard chemotherapy and radiation therapy given with or without paclitaxel and carboplatin work in treating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women with cervical cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy to the pelvis destroys potential cancer cells in the pelvic area and significantly reduces the risk of tumor recurrence in the pelvic area. It is not yet known if giving chemotherapy and radiation therapy with or without paclitaxel and carboplatin, may work better in treating HIV-positive patients with advanced cervical cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Atezolizumab before and / or with Chemoradiotherapy in Immune System Activation in Patients with Node Positive Stage IB2, II, IIIB, or IVA Cervical Cancer

    This phase I trial studies how well atezolizumab before and / or with standard of care chemoradiotherapy works in immune system activation in patients with stage IB2, II, IIIB, or IVA cervical cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving atezolizumab before and / or with chemoradiotherapy may lower the chance of tumors growing or spreading.
    Location: 15 locations

  • Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Rare Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab and bevacizumab work in treating patients with rare solid tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab and bevacizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Nab-Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Unresectable Stage IV Melanoma, Gynecological or Other Cancers

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nab-paclitaxel and bevacizumab in treating patients with stage IV melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable), cancer of the cervix, endometrium, ovary, fallopian tube or peritoneal cavity or with other cancers. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nab paclitaxel and bevacizumab may kill more tumor cells than nab-paclitaxel alone.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota